What's this?

endure

GCM
Morse is morse. It doesn't have a language although it does change according to the alphabet in use Latin, Cyrillic, Japanese etc.

There's a radio thingy in there somewhere because of the frequency range on the knob. Some sort of radio direction finder?
 
Morse is morse. It doesn't have a language although it does change according to the alphabet in use Latin, Cyrillic, Japanese etc.

There's a radio thingy in there somewhere because of the frequency range on the knob. Some sort of radio direction finder?
The interpretation chart has the Spanish ñ.
 
There's also an Ö. What's the reason for the CH?
The captions on the 'radio' controls are in English.
ETA, Just noticed an é.
Czech alphabet.
A, a, Á, á B, b C, c, Č, č D, d, Ď, ď E, e, É, é, ě F, f G, g H, h Ch, ch I, i, Í, í J, j K, k L, l M, m N, n, Ň, ň O, o, Ó, ó P, p Q, q R, r, Ř, ř S, s, Š, š T, t, Ť, ť U, u, Ú, ú, ů V, v W, w X, x Y, y, Ý, ý Z, z, Ž, ž
The Czech alphabet uses several letters in addition to the 26 letters used in the English alphabet. These are á, č, ď, é, ě, í, ň, ó, ř, š, ť, ú, ů, ý, ž.
The letter combination ch is also considered a single letter and is alphabetized after h.
Letters q, w, x are used only in words of foreign origin.
 

endure

GCM
I was trying to establish what operates on those frequencies but its pretty broad.


Non Directional Beacons use the MF band

"NDBs typically operate in the frequency range from 190 kHz to 535 kHz (although they are allocated frequencies from 190 to 1750 kHz) and transmit a carrier modulated by either 400 or 1020 Hz. "

 
I think it's a handheld radio navigation receiver. In the 30s/40s, there were a number of systems that transmitted A's and N's in morse, and when they merged, the aircraft was where it was supposed to be. Or some variation on that theme. Some of them operated in the LF range, 2-400kHz, as we see here.

The morse crib sheet on the back may be to help a less-practiced user pick up the station ident, which could also be transmitted.

The term "sensitivity" is a receiver term, not a transmitter term, and nor does there appear to be a trigger on the handle, where one might expect to find it, if it were some kind of signaling transmitter.

I suspect it is some kind of test tool or training aid, because the normal receiver would be fixed in an aircraft.

All of the above is just a guess, mind.
 

endure

GCM
It looks as though the whole of the Latin morse alphabet, including the accented letters, is on there.

View attachment 418319

Replying to my own post...

We had to learn all these and all the punctuation for our ticket. When somebody asked why we needed to the lecturer said 'in case you get a job on the QEII with all those foreign passengers'...
 

morsk

LE
The tilde isn't confined to Spanish. It's also used in Portuguese and Estonian.

Latin alphabet morse has a series of accented letters of which N tilde is one.
Not Estonian. On the O yes. N no.
 
Non Directional Beacons use the MF band

"NDBs typically operate in the frequency range from 190 kHz to 535 kHz (although they are allocated frequencies from 190 to 1750 kHz) and transmit a carrier modulated by either 400 or 1020 Hz. "

Thats a candidate or possibly LFR.


I'm not sure why it would need to be hand held though and it looks post war in terms of manufacture.
 

Latest Threads

Top