What's this (?) MK3 Tracjac, used for!

1.jpg


:scratch: Can anyone help me with this equipment?
Google etc useless when trying to find out how it works, and also what it's used for.

Tracjac suggests a jack, on tracks!
:nod:
Certainly got tracks, but where's the jack?
Is it the mid sectional beam that lifts... and do those handles move the tracks and also then raise and lower that beam.

What does COS/BPE identify?
This is a MK3!
So must be more advanced than a MK1 & MK2?

Again, online searches bring up nothing :pc::crash:
Pure guesswork so far then I admit, so maybe someone can put me.......

on the right track :D

Any help given, much appreciated in advance
:glomp:
 

Oyibo

LE
Looks like this might be your answer (the first post with pics):


Odd looking beast
 
:worship:

You got it Oyibo!
Thanks so much :cool:

Fascinating to read such a detailed thread on (as you say) this odd looking beast!
It apparently was rated a 15 tons, so certainly VERY heavy duty.

Well this could be the quickest ending to this thread enquiry!!
Solved :boogie:

Unless, there's possibly someone who used to operate one?
If there is (and you find this thread anytime) then I'd really like to hear from you.
:salut:
Were they nice and easy to operate these Tracjacs, or not!

Ummmmm... keep well clear though while in operation! :oops:
Certainly wouldn't want to get ones foot caught under any of those tracks, especially when loaded
:pissedoff:
 

Rocky_Yeti

Clanker
COS/BPE meaning from RAF Cosford on inventory BPE?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
Thanks for that update Rocky_Yeti
:grin:

I'll try and upload some more pictures of it (if possible) soon.
Might be some other markings (or ID tags etc) on it somewhere.

Looks like it's sat about unused for quite a long while though
:rolleyes:
 

Truxx

LE
:worship:

You got it Oyibo!
Thanks so much :cool:

Fascinating to read such a detailed thread on (as you say) this odd looking beast!
It apparently was rated a 15 tons, so certainly VERY heavy duty.

Well this could be the quickest ending to this thread enquiry!!
Solved :boogie:

Unless, there's possibly someone who used to operate one?
If there is (and you find this thread anytime) then I'd really like to hear from you.
:salut:
Were they nice and easy to operate these Tracjacs, or not!

Ummmmm... keep well clear though while in operation! :oops:
Certainly wouldn't want to get ones foot caught under any of those tracks, especially when loaded
:pissedoff:
I did not use that but was issued something similar when the 4 whirlwind helicopters came back from Cyprus. All went well until we came to pull them off at Marchwood.

The 4 choppers were in the tank deck of an LSL. The Helicopter pulling thing was attached to a dock truck and the other end attached to the front set of wheels on the first chopper. It was low tide and the RoRo ramp was very steep.

Nontheless all went well right up to the top of the ramp, at which the pulling thing broke in two and the whirlwind No1 scuttled backwards at ramming speed to get back to its 3 best mates which it did with a lot of crashing and banging.

On inspection the pulling thingy appeared to deliberately have parted company with itself.

Oh yes, said the RAF rep, they are designed to do that so if anyone rough houses them the helicopter undercarriage does not get damaged.

Shame about the rest of the helicopters, good job they were going to be disposed of anyway.
 
:omfg: Truxx
Wow what a fantastic share that was
Thanks!
:grin:
Must have been a scary thing though when the puller broke up.
Seems it ended up pre-scrapping the whirlwinds bigtime!

Here's more photos of this weird but rather fascinating Tracjac...
There is a plate at the backend, but not easy to see what it says..
1.jpg

The main wonder are these two handles, do they move the tracks along, or pump up the beam?
Maybe both??
Perhaps someone can help with that!
2.jpg


So then the front towbar is shown below, to which the towing tractor thus attaches.
Now to me, if just pulling this thing about (like with a modern broken tracked mini digger!) one would expect the tracks to simply slide along (certainly on flat concrete etc), unmoving?

Unless these actually DO move freely, AND under a very heavy load too??
3.jpg

It certainly is a very bizarre bit of kit.
I'm wondering rather than damaged aircraft recovery, if it could possibly be reused in modern times for heavy machinery repairs?

For example: Taking away one part of a machine (during splitting it for clutch repair), or possibly for moving a large engine or transmission into the repair shop?
 

Truxx

LE
:omfg: Truxx
Wow what a fantastic share that was
Thanks!
:grin:
Must have been a scary thing though when the puller broke up.
Seems it ended up pre-scrapping the whirlwinds bigtime!

Here's more photos of this weird but rather fascinating Tracjac...
There is a plate at the backend, but not easy to see what it says..
View attachment 450887
The main wonder are these two handles, do they move the tracks along, or pump up the beam?
Maybe both??
Perhaps someone can help with that!
View attachment 450888

So then the front towbar is shown below, to which the towing tractor thus attaches.
Now to me, if just pulling this thing about (like with a modern broken tracked mini digger!) one would expect the tracks to simply slide along (certainly on flat concrete etc), unmoving?

Unless these actually DO move freely, AND under a very heavy load too??
View attachment 450889
It certainly is a very bizarre bit of kit.
I'm wondering rather than damaged aircraft recovery, if it could possibly be reused in modern times for heavy machinery repairs?

For example: Taking away one part of a machine (during splitting it for clutch repair), or possibly for moving a large engine or transmission into the repair shop?
Obviously the helicopter incident was treated with all the seriousness it deserved.

ie none.

crabs were blamed, we took the remains out with forklifts and laughed like drains at the look on the face of the tugmaster driver as his load made a run for it.......
 

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