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What's the best job?

Yokel

LE
Train driving .
If I had my time again , I'd love to have had a crack at this.
Salary : About £50K for a basic 5 day week £70K with overtime
Good pension and travel benefits
Little or no contact with passengers , so no stress from that point of view
Most train cabs these days are clean , modern and comfortable , and even 50 year old Class 47's and 37's have a hob for putting a brew on .
Privatization and growth have led to competition for experienced drivers which has kept salaries at a high level .
I have met a driver on SW trains who gave up corporate law to take up train driving
The only downside is coping with jumpers , and statistically they are more common than the public realizes .

Or a Conductor. I cannot remember when it was, but I met an ex Army Air Corps crewman who had joined the train company and found that there was banter and stuff. I asked him if he missed flying and he said no.

I have met a few veterans from the different services doing the same job, and you get to meet lots of people.

Assuming you are physically fit, have an aptitude to study, and want to make a difference then why not become a Paramedic?
 
Or a Conductor. I cannot remember when it was, but I met an ex Army Air Corps crewman who had joined the train company and found that there was banter and stuff. I asked him if he missed flying and he said no.

I have met a few veterans from the different services doing the same job, and you get to meet lots of people.

Assuming you are physically fit, have an aptitude to study, and want to make a difference then why not become a Paramedic?
I'm 58 , so I'm not planning to re train to do anything , but paramedic wouldn't be on my radar .
Very stressful and increasing attacks from the public would dissuade me .
 

Teeblerone

Old-Salt
Department of Work and Pensions is expecting to hire a shedload of new Work Coaches to deal with the massive uptick in unemployment expected when furlough ends.
There'll be a lot of diversity, inclusivity, equity and LGBTWXYZ etc to swallow though.

It might be marginally interesting - in my experience, after being on one, you'd need 'conflict management' skills as well. A fair proportion of people will be there only because they'd get sanctioned otherwise.
Learn how to click buttons for powerpoint presentations, rein in your swearing, up your tolerance for d1ckishness - quids in.
Pay & benefits probably not good, but an easy life.

How about gardening?
 

Teeblerone

Old-Salt
I guess the best job is the one where you enjoy what you are doing, get job satisfaction, earn a reasonable wedge and look forward to going to work every day. Obviously the specific role and level of responsibility will be different for each individual because we all have different interests, abilities, knowledge, skills, aims and outlooks.

Most of us that served will have enjoyed our time overall, even allowing for the really shit days, because of the experiences we had and friends we made along the way. Some will have gone on and had successful careers after their time in green/navy blue/polyester and their second or third careers may surpass their time in the mob and for others nothing will be able to match it. I've had a small number of different roles since leaving the navy and even allowing for looking back with rose-tinted glasses and glossing over the shit times none have been able to match my time in the RN. It wasn't a job, it was an adventure.

Last month I started a CS job, starting at EO level. The pay is not brilliant in comparison to non-public sector salaries but it's above average salary and I can expect one promotion and hopefully two before I retire. Fortunately I've never been driven by money but 12 years or more's worth of a CS pension on top of my Pusser's pension should soften the blow. What appeals to me about the job is that it is pretty niche, there's not all that many people doing what I am going to be doing. Probation period is about 6-12 months and the training and mentoring is going to take a couple of years or so. There will occasionally be elements of high risk but with that comes the rewards. The rewards won't be fiscal but more in the way of job satisfaction.

The downside is that I have to commute further, a 60 mile daily round trip, although mainly motorway miles. With that I will also have to travel around the country, often at short notice, working unsociable hours, as well as being in an on-call rota outside 'office' hours. I guess coming from a forces background helps with that as we tend to have that type of mentality and resilience which also explains why so many of my colleagues are ex-forces.

Is it the best job I could be doing? I guess it has to be considering the only jobs / organisations I could see bettering it, and there's only two of them, I'm not qualified or experienced to do so extremely unlikely ever to get anywhere near them.

Heard that there are quite a few ex-Forces/coppers in the civil service, especially the 'enforcement' bits.
Have been looking at CS jobs. The base pay is just about exactly National Wage (£26,500?), but you get shift allowances for working weekends etc. The pensions are average, not gold plated from speaking to people.
Of course, there would be a lot of 'awareness' courses, but how hard could they be?

I imagine Border Force are going to be quite busy for the foreseeable....
Edit: Though CS have not had meaningful payrises for 10 years? 1%?
 

Teeblerone

Old-Salt
History.

Though no one told me at the time that there's no future in history...

I'm seriously considering going into a trade, then I could choose my own hours and maybe in a few years try and start a company.

This pretty much sums it up, I work in FE but similar circumstances and feel it's a dead end job.



Dr Karl Gensberg says he is "angry and frustrated" with a series of short-term contracts and a salary that after 10 years had reached £23,000.

Dr Gensberg's decision to become a gas fitter was prompted by a chance conversation with the man who fitted his boiler - who, it emerged, was earning much more than the academic.

Yep. Last science job I looked at was a lab manager, 24/7, PhD, 7 staff. £19,800.
(EDIT! this was about 10 years ago. Sorry)
I had some bloody great times working in labs, but FFS!!
 
Last edited:
Yep. Last science job I looked at was a lab manager, 24/7, PhD, 7 staff. £19,800.

I had some bloody great times working in labs, but FFS!!
Really? My best friend runs a lab and he's on more than 4 times that.
 

Teeblerone

Old-Salt
Really? My best friend runs a lab and he's on more than 4 times that.

Yeah, a small food manufacturer (and it was about 10 years ago! apologies for missing that out).
If you work at an established place that's not going to get taken over, you can get a very decent wage. A lot of places are automated as well, so maybe it's more about management than science.

If I was starting out these days, lab tech rather than a (full time) degree.
Or a train driver. Boring, but a lot of responsibility if it goes wrong. Don't have to deal with passengers, like a bus driver.
Or electrician, mate does contracts for planes & trains, plenty of time off when he wants, runs a small company on the side, gets his trips paid for. I reckon that's pretty sorted.
 

Class 66

Old-Salt
Train driving .
If I had my time again , I'd love to have had a crack at this.
Salary : About £50K for a basic 5 day week £70K with overtime
Good pension and travel benefits
Little or no contact with passengers , so no stress from that point of view
Most train cabs these days are clean , modern and comfortable , and even 50 year old Class 47's and 37's have a hob for putting a brew on .
Privatization and growth have led to competition for experienced drivers which has kept salaries at a high level .
I have met a driver on SW trains who gave up corporate law to take up train driving
The only downside is coping with jumpers , and statistically they are more common than the public realizes .
That is what I do, after 32 years service I started driving freight. First couple of years it was ok but now, working on my own, it sucks the life out of me. I could not have done the job as a young man! 4 years to do then endex!
 

Dr Death

War Hero
At the moment Undertakers seem to be doing good business?
Less people at a funeral, but still charging the full price for it.
 
Dole Claimant.

You can do what you want, when you want and with whom you want. No stress. You can go for your entry level and work up through various specialist qualifications, increasing your income as you go.

And just remember your interview preparation so the job centre know you are taking your interview referrals seriously

 
Hi DC... Still searching for something I see. Turn to god and relax mate... bugger a few boys and watch the dosh roll in. The white collar is like a credit card. Ever seen a priest or vicar begging outside of Sports Direct? Well then...

You know I have thought about that a few times, a free house courtesy of the church. A nice quiet village to roam around in. Getting invited to tea parties by all the yummy mummies. I reckon I could even wax lyrical about the Christian love doctrine. Maybe I could do what the tellyvangelists do in the states and ask for donations?

I once dressed up as a Catholic priest for Halloween complete with dog collar, hat and robes. I hit the town pretty hard and was blessing everyone in the pubs so I have some experience.

I do find the little countryside churches fascinating, especially the Medieval ones. Many have quirky plaques and memorials to obscure battles from the byegone days of empire. It's probably a nice job tbh.
 
You know I have thought about that a few times, a free house courtesy of the church. A nice quiet village to roam around in. Getting invited to tea parties by all the yummy mummies. I reckon I could even wax lyrical about the Christian love doctrine. Maybe I could do what the tellyvangelists do in the states and ask for donations?

I once dressed up as a Catholic priest for Halloween complete with dog collar, hat and robes. I hit the town pretty hard and was blessing everyone in the pubs so I have some experience.

I do find the little countryside churches fascinating, especially the Medieval ones. Many have quirky plaques and memorials to obscure battles from the byegone days of empire. It's probably a nice job tbh.

Even better if you go COE, you don't have to believe in God these days just be a trendy vicar
 
Heard that there are quite a few ex-Forces/coppers in the civil service, especially the 'enforcement' bits.
Have been looking at CS jobs. The base pay is just about exactly National Wage (£26,500?), but you get shift allowances for working weekends etc. The pensions are average, not gold plated from speaking to people.
Of course, there would be a lot of 'awareness' courses, but how hard could they be?

I imagine Border Force are going to be quite busy for the foreseeable....
Edit: Though CS have not had meaningful payrises for 10 years? 1%?

There's a small difference in salaries between the different CS departments for the same grade but the base level grades AO & AA don't pay all that well. I'm at EO level which is a little above national average wage (although a lot higher than the regional average wage for where I live). I contribute 5.45% of my salary for my pension and my employer contributes 27.1% which is not too shabby. CS pensions changed a while back so they are not as generous as they once were, much like happened with AF pensions.

There are a number of courses I have to do, mostly e-learning stuff, but also a number of 'attendance' courses. I'm getting paid for it and, apart from the usual DSE, COSHH, fire safety, 'awareness' type courses, they are relevant to my role so can't complain.
 
I feel incredibly lucky to have landed my dream job in a saturated market. About 5 years ago my interest was piqued by a UAV pilots course (Heli-guy) and being in sales at the time and very unrewarding I took the plunge. I'm now an offshore UAV operator and recently finished my first field survey on Burbo Bank Extension. It's no joke about being called the 20 minuters - up, boff, down - I don't even have to think about taking the pics as I have a chap to do it for me. 4 WTG a day if conditions permit, none if the wind goes over 10m/s - often spend most of my day smashing out my OU engineering course. Should have done this years ago
BFD94363-D7F6-474A-8BB8-947F7C2BCA0F.jpeg
 
You know I have thought about that a few times, a free house courtesy of the church. A nice quiet village to roam around in. Getting invited to tea parties by all the yummy mummies. I reckon I could even wax lyrical about the Christian love doctrine. Maybe I could do what the tellyvangelists do in the states and ask for donations?

I once dressed up as a Catholic priest for Halloween complete with dog collar, hat and robes. I hit the town pretty hard and was blessing everyone in the pubs so I have some experience.

I do find the little countryside churches fascinating, especially the Medieval ones. Many have quirky plaques and memorials to obscure battles from the byegone days of empire. It's probably a nice job tbh.
Cof E vicars these days have several parishes to look after .
As a churchwarden , I sat in on the interview panel for the last one .
Most applicants are women looking for a second career , and when I asked " What are your driving and navigation skills like ? " They were all taken aback ,'till I explained how large the benefice is and the number of churches they cover is ( in our case 9 ) and that negotiating these lanes in snow or after a hard frost or in the pitch black takes some getting used to .
If I were ordained ( not an ambition I harbour , I can assure you ) and able to pick any job , it would be Chaplain to one of the Cambridge colleges . Dining in College every night , talking bollocks at the High table with very little else to do than finish that Great British Novel I've been thinking about for years .
 
If I was 18 again I deffo wouldn’t study law again ( even the 1 st time it took me 2 years to work out that with morals I wasn’t going to fit in there.)
The one that got away was a 3 year course at Southampton ( I think), in Aeronautical engineering.
I know blokes who did the course and now can work anywhere in the world on engines and airframes. Trade might be a bit slow at present but they have had the pick of work for 30 years and If they didn’t like the outfit just walked into a better job.
 

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