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What's the best job?

Ravers

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
I'm repeating myself here...............

I found this MBA and will probably start it in a year or so to keep the little grey cells ticking over.


It costs just over 6 grand which is what attracted me to it. It is the cheapest online MBA I have found from a real, accredited, pukka university.

In comparison the OU, which was my first port of enquiry, wants somewhere around 17K to 18K for the same thing.

There you go.

Other than that I can tell you plumbers earn a decent wedge, as do sparky's, hours to suit yourself once you have the experience.

There is an even cheaper way to get an accredited MBA.

Do a Level 7 diploma in strategic management and leadership, depending on where you do this it can be as cheap as a grand.

Then do an MBA top up course which is basically just the dissertation. Cheapest one I’ve seen is at Northampton uni for £3,500.

Boom, fully accredited MBA for under 5 grand.
 
Serious answer - do you have any hobbies? Do you do anything that other people might be willing to pay for - perhaps sing or play a musical instrument, make things from wood or something else, write creatively? If so, why not try seeing if you can sell that, in your spare time, just to see if there is a market, and build things up if it goes well?

Instead of education, could you provide training for small companies and other groups?
That's a very good suggestion, usually our hobbies are the things that most interest us, about which we know the most and are most passionate about, and that passion and knowledge can often be something others are willing to pay a bit for.

During lockdown I decided to do a bit of teaching on a Saturday morning on something that I happen to know a bit about but which I didn't think anybody would be really interested in, it would be little more than something to do to pass the time. To my shock I discovered that in fact it is something that is regarded as quite valuable and people are willing to pay, maybe not serious money, but enough to fund my bar tab.

I have now been approached by an institution that wants me to go down the road of making it an actual business, with them lending their name and providing the marketing and admin and me delivering the product, all done online over Zoom. I am not going to make a fortune but it will amount to a decent part-time wage, and all done from my spare room on my laptop at a time when I'd be sitting around on the laptop anyway getting into arguments with blokes here on ARRSE.
 
Big public sector organisations is where it’s at. Easy to hide, pretty much impossible to get sacked from, hardly any accountability due to the massive, multilayered organisations.

I’ve done the whole dream job thing, running a world class shotgun factory and it turned out to be serious hard graft and stress.

Massive brownie points when you told people what you did for a living and there were a few perks like posh parties, a nice clothing allowance and the use of a chauffeur driven Bentley from time to time. But the reality was long hours, zero promotion prospects, constant stress and not a massive amount of money in return.

I now work for a very large, very dull public sector organisation as an engineering manager. I‘m on double what I was at the gun factory and I get twice as much holiday. Massive pension, been promoted 3 times in 6 years and well on my way to further greatness.

And the best part is, it’s a piece of piss. All I do is go to meetings and sign bits of paper. By virtue of not having a northern accent and not wearing a rugby league top to work, people seem to think I know what I’m doing.

They occasionally let me fly drones around the place which breaks up the boredom, but most of the time I’m just sat at a desk doing basic line management stuff. Trying to motivate a team, who are already very well motivated due to earning over double the National average and living in a place where you can buy a 3 bedroom house for 60 grand.

My only beef with it is the lefty woke bollox that’s creeping in to every facet of the working day. Briefs about racism and transgenderism and rainbow flags and shit all over the place.

I don’t give a ****. I hate everyone equally, regardless of gender, race, religion or sexual orientation.


got any remote jobs going?
 
"Pigeon shouter" seems to be a very popular occupation for some contributors to this site.
 
@Dashing_Chap I seem to recall you once saying that you are self employed or that you ran your own company. Could you use those skills to set up something else? Could you do some sort of consulting service? Even things like proofreading are marketable.

What did you graduate in? What skills and knowledge can you sell?

History.

Though no one told me at the time that there's no future in history...

I'm seriously considering going into a trade, then I could choose my own hours and maybe in a few years try and start a company.

This pretty much sums it up, I work in FE but similar circumstances and feel it's a dead end job.



Dr Karl Gensberg says he is "angry and frustrated" with a series of short-term contracts and a salary that after 10 years had reached £23,000.

Dr Gensberg's decision to become a gas fitter was prompted by a chance conversation with the man who fitted his boiler - who, it emerged, was earning much more than the academic.
 

Funbaby

Old-Salt
History.

Though no one told me at the time that there's no future in history...

I'm seriously considering going into a trade, then I could choose my own hours and maybe in a few years try and start a company.

This pretty much sums it up, I work in FE but similar circumstances and feel it's a dead end job.



Dr Karl Gensberg says he is "angry and frustrated" with a series of short-term contracts and a salary that after 10 years had reached £23,000.

Dr Gensberg's decision to become a gas fitter was prompted by a chance conversation with the man who fitted his boiler - who, it emerged, was earning much more than the academic.

There are a few sites dedicated to a sub genre of scientific writing known as “quit lit” where academics outline why they finally left their ivory towers to get a proper job. Shit pay and career progression are the main complaints.

This guys a bit dim; he should go to industry. He would start on 40-50k with 10 years experience with molecular biology with plenty of chances to promote.

The other thing he could do is go work in another country.

Academia is terrible at steering people to the “Dark side” (Industry). Most people who make the jump are much happier.
 

Polyester

War Hero
History.

Though no one told me at the time that there's no future in history...

I'm seriously considering going into a trade, then I could choose my own hours and maybe in a few years try and start a company.

This pretty much sums it up, I work in FE but similar circumstances and feel it's a dead end job.



Dr Karl Gensberg says he is "angry and frustrated" with a series of short-term contracts and a salary that after 10 years had reached £23,000.

Dr Gensberg's decision to become a gas fitter was prompted by a chance conversation with the man who fitted his boiler - who, it emerged, was earning much more than the academic.
Whereabouts are you based DC? (If you don’t mind me asking).

Equally, which trade are you considering?
 
Best job? Mine.

I'm part-time now, 20 hours a week working (shirking) from home. If I actually do anything other than surf for more than 1 hour a week (including a 10-15 minute weekly Teams meeting), I'm having a very busy week.

Today I did nothing, absolutely nothing, apart from chatting to a colleague online about nothing connected to work. A very typical day to be honest.

I didn't do much more when I did 40 hours a week, but that's what being very good at your job gets you I suppose.

It's a hard life.
 
There is an even cheaper way to get an accredited MBA.

Do a Level 7 diploma in strategic management and leadership, depending on where you do this it can be as cheap as a grand.

Then do an MBA top up course which is basically just the dissertation. Cheapest one I’ve seen is at Northampton uni for £3,500.

Boom, fully accredited MBA for under 5 grand.
Seems to me all that achieves is letters after your name. It skips all of the learnings you get from actually studying for an MBA which is kind of the point.

I have both a Level 7 in Management and Leadership and an MBA. The former was assessed on my time in uniform and had near zero business content. It has added nothing to my career or my businesses.

The latter involved reading an awful lot of books and articles, attending seminars, lectures etc from which I learnt a great deal, much of which I apply daily.

In neither case does the qualification bother me; I don’t use the post nominals in my business and I’ll never need to get another job. Frankly, I’m unemployable after 9 years as an entrepreneur.
 
Seems to me all that achieves is letters after your name. It skips all of the learnings you get from actually studying for an MBA which is kind of the point.

I have both a Level 7 in Management and Leadership and an MBA. The former was assessed on my time in uniform and had near zero business content. It has added nothing to my career or my businesses.

The latter involved reading an awful lot of books and articles, attending seminars, lectures etc from which I learnt a great deal, much of which I apply daily.

In neither case does the qualification bother me; I don’t use the post nominals in my business and I’ll never need to get another job. Frankly, I’m unemployable after 9 years as an entrepreneur.
I too have an MBA, I can't think of a single occasion in almost thirty years in business, either working for my family, for a major corporation or self employed, that I ever used a single thing that I learned from the course.

It's nice to stick the letters on the end of your name if you feel it will impress the sort of person who is impressed by it, or when shouting at the clouds online and you can pompously boast to some anonymous person you'll never meet "As someone who is educated to master's level..." but beyond that pretty useless.
 

Tongnye

Clanker
anyone picking a job working with animals, doesnt do it for the lolly ;) after 3to 4 years(being exsquaddie can take up to 4 years) apprenticeship as a zoo keeper in germany,being flexible ,not just looking after cute and cuddlies, opens a world of courses and travelling, more qualifications and more experience bring a good rep. and more lolly,last years spent travelling ,buying and shipping animals from zoos and dealers in many countries,also supervising quarantine stations in the Canary islands ,Togo, rotterdam and Hamburg.the film hatari was made on one of our Kenyan shipping stations, , even now 20 years after retirement I still get at least 6weeks junket everyyear, last 6 years Panda care on Taiwan, vulture and eagle captive breeding in spain, and my favourite Borneo trying to civilise ginger RE,s(orangs to semi educated) thats my favourite job, and the pensions are not bad either,
 
I too have an MBA, I can't think of a single occasion in almost thirty years in business, either working for my family, for a major corporation or self employed, that I ever used a single thing that I learned from the course.

It's nice to stick the letters on the end of your name if you feel it will impress the sort of person who is impressed by it, or when shouting at the clouds online and you can pompously boast to some anonymous person you'll never meet "As someone who is educated to master's level..." but beyond that pretty useless.
If I wished, I could stick a long trail for letters after my name. I don’t; the only times I have ever used any of my nominals was working in Germany on big engineering projects. EurIng made a huge difference opening doors.

My perspective on MBAs is that many people find themselves well qualified and experienced but stovepiped. To make the step to a senior management or beyond to Board level role; they need a broader perspective on the whole business, not just their niche.

To give an example, Noughties, I used to mentor engineers on their Chartership program and I sat on numerous Chartered Professional Review panels. Invariably we saw very good engineers (far better than me) who had little or no knowledge of the business beyond their role. That’s where IMHO MBAs, MMgts etc etc are valuable; they widen horizons.

In my case, I scratched an itch of becoming an entrepreneur in my late 40s and did so in an entirely new sector. There’s no connection between the huge DBFO projects I used to bid and a consumer products business. I picked a very practical MBA focused on entrepreneurship. As we scale and build out product development, manufacturing, marketing, HR etc etc I’m often in areas in which I had little knowledge and no experience before my MBA. Sure, I’ve got good mentors and I’m in a well-known scaling up program, but there’s rarely a day I don’t use something from my MBA.
 

Ravers

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
If I wished, I could stick a long trail for letters after my name. I don’t; the only times I have ever used any of my nominals was working in Germany on big engineering projects. EurIng made a huge difference opening doors.

My perspective on MBAs is that many people find themselves well qualified and experienced but stovepiped. To make the step to a senior management or beyond to Board level role; they need a broader perspective on the whole business, not just their niche.

To give an example, Noughties, I used to mentor engineers on their Chartership program and I sat on numerous Chartered Professional Review panels. Invariably we saw very good engineers (far better than me) who had little or no knowledge of the business beyond their role. That’s where IMHO MBAs, MMgts etc etc are valuable; they widen horizons.

In my case, I scratched an itch of becoming an entrepreneur in my late 40s and did so in an entirely new sector. There’s no connection between the huge DBFO projects I used to bid and a consumer products business. I picked a very practical MBA focused on entrepreneurship. As we scale and build out product development, manufacturing, marketing, HR etc etc I’m often in areas in which I had little knowledge and no experience before my MBA. Sure, I’ve got good mentors and I’m in a well-known scaling up program, but there’s rarely a day I don’t use something from my MBA.

Interesting thoughts on MBAs and post noms.

Obviously it varies massively from industry to industry.

Where I work being Chartered is everything. Doesn’t really matter what as, it just shows you’ve hit a level. Nearly every management level job here has being Chartered as a requirement.

Chartered Manager, Chartered Engineer, Chartered whatever.... doesn’t really matter. They like people with letters after their names.

An MBA would certainly bump you up the food chain. It just shows you’re capable of passing a course that not many other people have.

I’m looking at doing one for this reason, but it’s literally just a tick box exercise for me to get the letters as quickly and as cheaply as possible.

Having said that I know of only one bloke here who has an MBA (or at least advertises the fact he has one) and he’s not as high up the ladder as I’d expect for someone with that qualification.
 
No post nominals for me, apart from the sainted 'psc' which rightly nobody in civvy street understands or cares about.

I hate to say this but if you want a job that pays well with a good pension and little stress, join the Civil Service although personally I couldn't handle the shame. Jobs in civvy street that pay very well are accompanied by greater stress the more they are worth - believe me, I know!
 
Interesting thoughts on MBAs and post noms.

Obviously it varies massively from industry to industry.

Where I work being Chartered is everything. Doesn’t really matter what as, it just shows you’ve hit a level. Nearly every management level job here has being Chartered as a requirement.

Chartered Manager, Chartered Engineer, Chartered whatever.... doesn’t really matter. They like people with letters after their names.

An MBA would certainly bump you up the food chain. It just shows you’re capable of passing a course that not many other people have.

I’m looking at doing one for this reason, but it’s literally just a tick box exercise for me to get the letters as quickly and as cheaply as possible.

Having said that I know of only one bloke here who has an MBA (or at least advertises the fact he has one) and he’s not as high up the ladder as I’d expect for someone with that qualification.
I’ve never really got the concept of being Chartered in anything other than the vocational profession where it has statutory meaning or are internationally recognised. Can’t see the point of being a Chartered Manager.

I became a Chartered Engineer in the Army because it was a pre-requisite to promote as a PQE. I went into the commercial side of construction engineering when I left, where it was almost entirely irrelevant. Didn’t get me the job and didn’t make any difference to clients. Our business cards didn’t have any pre or post nominals; I had to get permission from the HR VP to put EurIng on my German cards.

Personally, I don’t see much purpose in accrediting what you already know other than it’s a good affirmation process to go into during service resettlement. I’m much more interested in learning new stuff that I can apply.
 
Hi DC... Still searching for something I see. Turn to god and relax mate... bugger a few boys and watch the dosh roll in. The white collar is like a credit card. Ever seen a priest or vicar begging outside of Sports Direct? Well then...
 
Train driving .
If I had my time again , I'd love to have had a crack at this.
Salary : About £50K for a basic 5 day week £70K with overtime
Good pension and travel benefits
Little or no contact with passengers , so no stress from that point of view
Most train cabs these days are clean , modern and comfortable , and even 50 year old Class 47's and 37's have a hob for putting a brew on .
Privatization and growth have led to competition for experienced drivers which has kept salaries at a high level .
I have met a driver on SW trains who gave up corporate law to take up train driving
The only downside is coping with jumpers , and statistically they are more common than the public realizes .
 

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