Whatever happened to our seaside?

Ciggie

On ROPS
On ROPs
When I first went to Torbay in 89 it was a lovely area, people were very friendly, the lovely Devon accent was heard everywhere, there were loads of predominantly British tourists and very little crime to speak of. This article doesn't do justice to the extent of what a pit it is today. They talk about relatively cheap accomodation...well, that is a matter of opinion. Getting a shitehole unfit for human habitation but approved by the council for anything less than about 120 quid a week is effectively impossible. In most cases housing benefits are not enough to pay the rent, so people are forced to pay out of their social security to make up the difference. Crime is rife, escapees from inner city wastelands particularly in the North and the Midlands are everywhere. Proper accents have been replaced by something like 'estuary English', there really aren't many tourists of any kind any more, no industry, no jobs and yet thanks to the small number of very high earners who actually work in London and the home counties but live in luxury in Devon, statistically it is an area of high wealth. Yeah, right.


English coastal towns have some of country’s worst health, report says
 
And your point is?
 

Troy

LE

Whatever happened to our seaside?​


The Country is too full nowadays, and with people wanting more. More space from others, more parking, more rights and so on. With the overcrowding comes all the detriment. And all the problems of nearby towns get pushed to the edges. I'm afraid the jolly old seaside that we used to know is long gone now.
 
Do you have trouble with English ?

No.

your post simply outlines what Torbay is like these days. So what? It has no god given right to exist, and given I live near there, I'd suggest a significant proportion of its woes are entirely self-inflicted. Complacency and smugness - whilst not a Devon only trait - are rife.

Not for nothing was Fawlty Towers set in Torbay.
 
No.

your post simply outlines what Torbay is like these days. So what? It has no god given right to exist, and given I live near there, I'd suggest a significant proportion of its woes are entirely self-inflicted. Complacency and smugness - whilst not a Devon only trait - are rife.

Not for nothing was Fawlty Towers set in Torbay.

Flowery Tw@ts was the BnB blueprint.
 
Whitley Bay looks like it is suffering from the worst 90s hangover on the planet.

The Spanish City redevelopment deserves top marks but some of the streets nearby look like Mostar.
 
D

Deleted 4482

Guest
No.

your post simply outlines what Torbay is like these days. So what? It has no god given right to exist, and given I live near there, I'd suggest a significant proportion of its woes are entirely self-inflicted. Complacency and smugness - whilst not a Devon only trait - are rife.

Not for nothing was Fawlty Towers set in Torbay.
Good point. I think lots of places in the South West have been resting on their laurels and still dining out under the 'English riviera' label for too long now.
It doesn't help that many locals equate laziness as just being 'a bit more laid back- like in the med'.
 

cowgoesmoo

Old-Salt
Blackpool and Bournemouth have both been ruined by the influx of junkies and bums, fully supported and encouraged by local councils.

I don't even recognise Brighton now, totally changed from the place I remember going as a sprog in the 80s. Again encouraged by the loony-left politicians
 
D

Deleted 4482

Guest
Blackpool and Bournemouth have both been ruined by the influx of junkies and bums, fully supported and encouraged by local councils.

I don't even recognise Brighton now, totally changed from the place I remember going as a sprog in the 80s. Again encouraged by the loony-left politicians
Yep- Take Plymouth for example...trap off with some bird down Union Street and decide to get a B&B for the night...

Often got "look you don't want to stay here tonight" or...you got a room and realised the next room was occupied by some bum who was being housed there by the local council or whatever.

This resulted in a situation where only a hanful of places were used and, at around 06:30, doors to rooms were opened and lots of "morning mate" and knowing winks exchanged as matelots from several ships started arranging who'd share a taxi back to the yard, and swap notes etc etc.

* I think Esther - the matelot molester has retired now and buggered off back up to jockland.
 

lextalionis

War Hero
I live near enough to Blackpool and it's always a frightful place to visit (work has taken me there quite a bit over the years).

It's a place where the average mental age is about 15 (those above this permanent adolescence tend to escape), which perhaps reflects the desperate, neverending-hen-night atmosphere of the place. A doctor friend works at the hospital there and she tells me frightening stories - HIV+ patients deliberately cutting themselves and flinging blood at doctors, nurses and patients, as well as the ubiquitous druggies and drunks.

A Labour Clowncil, of course.
 
The B&B thing is because no one wanted to go to "English Riveria" because they're shite, and thus they're cheap for any council to provide their statutory accommodation requirement, and handily dump them far away from their local area...
 

anglo

LE
Good point. I think lots of places in the South West have been resting on their laurels and still dining out under the 'English riviera' label for too long now.
It doesn't help that many locals equate laziness as just being 'a bit more laid back- like in the med'.
There are many reasons why the coastal towns in the South West are in a poor state
One reason is the amount of free loaders living in the place


Government announced it's to close the loophole which is estimated to cost Cornwall over £10m a year

Mevagissey is home to a large proportion of second homes and holiday lets

Cornwall has 1 per cent of England's population and 17 per cent of its second homes; in some towns, second homes are the majority. Already the signs are going up in the south-west: 'No more second homes, our village is dying.

There is now to many people in the SW, and there's more coming in,
the infrastructure is lagging way behind,
How long have you got?. For the rest of what's gone wrong
 
There are many reasons why the coastal towns in the South West are in a poor state
One reason is the amount of free loaders living in the place


Government announced it's to close the loophole which is estimated to cost Cornwall over £10m a year

Mevagissey is home to a large proportion of second homes and holiday lets

Cornwall has 1 per cent of England's population and 17 per cent of its second homes; in some towns, second homes are the majority. Already the signs are going up in the south-west: 'No more second homes, our village is dying.

There is now to many people in the SW, and there's more coming in,
the infrastructure is lagging way behind,
How long have you got?. For the rest of what's gone wrong

the second homes that the locals sold to "incomers" and promptly pocketed the profits? I'm sorry, but a lot of "locals" are reaping what they sewed.
 

Chef

LE
Possibly over the years the UK as a whole has become very expensive for a holiday.

The rise of the package holiday meant that for less than the price of two weeks in dear old blighty one could get two weeks abroad with reliable weather and better conditions in countries where people enjoy serving you and are proud of the job they do.

I agree with @alfred_the_great regarding second homes, but who'll be the first to sell to a local when everybody else is making a mint selling to outsiders?

It's the same attitude shown for village shops, great cries of woe when they close, usually from people who haven't set foot inside the place for years if at all.
 
D

Deleted 4482

Guest
Regarding 'incomers' - I'm mindful of what the situation was in Rosyth - the locals hated the navy there, lots of gripes etc etc.

Navy reduced its Rosyth type stuff and...

Tumbleweed and "Woe is me...we've no economy now!"
 

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