What would make you buy an electric car?

Like it, or not . . . and, clearly there are a number who DO NOT like it . . . it is going to happen . . .

Published by: James Attwood, digital editor News, AUTOCAR magazine, on 09 June 2021.


New Renault ElectriCity to centre firm's future EV production.

Project will turn three plants in northern France into an EV production hub producing 400,000 vehicles per year.

Renault has outlined plans to turn three of its factories in northern France into the largest electric vehicle production hub in Europe, producing up to 400,000 vehicles a year.


The French firm will establish a new legal entity, named Renault ElectriCity, that will encompass its plants in Douai, Maubeuge and Ruitz. The three sites will produce Renault’s forthcoming electric passenger vehicles, including the Mégane E-Vision and 5 EV, along with electric commercial vehicles and EV components.

Renault has previously confirmed that it plans to make the reborn 5 EV and Mégane E-Vision at its long-running Douai facility, which opened in 1970 and was the site for production of the original 5. The firm says another C-segment electric vehicle based on the CMF-EV platform used for the Mégane E-Vision will also be produced at the site and it has hinted at other vehicles based on the EV city car platform that will underpin the 5 EV.

The Maubeuge facility has been used to produce Renault commercial vehicles since 1980 and is currently home to the Kangoo van and the badge-engineered Mercedes-Benz Citan. The next-generation electric Kangoo E-Tech Electric, next-gen Citan and related Nissan NV200 will all be built at the facility. Renault said “other variants” of the next-gen Kangoo will be built at the plant alongside the EVs.

Renault’s Ruitz plant, which currently manufactures gearboxes, will in future be used to produce electrical components.

Renault says the ElectriCity scheme will create 700 new jobs by 2024 – 350 at Maubeuge, with the rest split between Douai and Ruitz – and the firm will establish a university and training centre to teach the new skills required for EV production.

The production plans do not include making any batteries. Renault bosses have previously called for the French government to support a battery gigafactory, which, they hinted, was key to encourage EV production in the country.

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Published by: Jack Warrick, AUTOCAR magazine, on 09 June 2021.

Gridserve acquires Ecotricity Electric Highway EV charging network.

Gridserve will invest heavily in the network, replacing all existing chargers with new tech.

Green energy firm Ecotricity has sold its Electric Highway charging network to sustainable energy business Gridserve.

The Electric Highway was the world’s first national charging network and played an important role in supporting the shift to electric cars in the UK, with chargers installed all over the country.


The sale comes after Gridserve and Ecotricity recently announced a partnership, with the goal of upgrading the UK’s charging infrastructure.

“It’s a real honour for Gridserve to have been chosen by Ecotricity as the organisation to take the Electric Highway forward in its next phase,” said Toddington Harper, Gridserve CEO.

“Our purpose is to deliver sustainable energy and move the needle on climate change, and the upgraded network will provide the confidence for millions more people to make the successful transition to electric vehicles in the earliest possible timeframes,” Harper said.

According to Gridserve, the sale will allow Ecotricity to advance its core green energy business, bringing forward several solar and battery storage projects to be built without government support.

Some Ecotricity innovations include Britain’s first Green Gasmill, which involves making natural gas from grass, and Sky Mining, a carbon capture and storage process that turns carbon dioxide in the atmosphere into diamonds.

Gridserve has already invested heavily in the UK’s charging infrastructure, having opened the country’s first bespoke electric car forecourt in Essex last year. The company said investment will continue, including replacing all existing chargers in the network with more advanced options with contactless payment.

“The Electric Highway needs a growth spurt,” said Dale Vince, Ecotricity founder. “For this, the Electric Highway needs an owner with access to serious funding and real commitment to the cause. I’m delighted to have found the ideal company to hand the baton to, in Gridserve.”

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I will voluntarily buy an EV because I'm not a climate sceptic
With Mrs RCT(V) yesterday, visited an MG showroom, and asked the nice man if I could "kick some tyres" ?!

I am increasingly impressed now, at the quality of their latest products . . . if still NOT, at the glacial pace at which the (PRC government owned) SAIC company - that own MG - react and respond to market forces and developments :( .

I am always pleased and surprised whenever Mrs RCT(V) shows and interest in, and seems to understand, things in which I am interested.

Whilst we were discussing MG's "ZS EV" electric SUV, I was taken-aback by Mrs RCT(V)'s comment, that she wondered WHY, there was no system of the electric vehicle itself re-charging its own battery !!

It was too close to lunch-time/food, to "go-off" onto one of my "man‘plaining" exercises, into the characteristics of range-extenders (BMW i3), and the more universal regenerative-braking (48v systems), but it is encouraging to know I can return to the subject in the future :) .



 
With Mrs RCT(V) yesterday, visited an MG showroom, and asked the nice man if I could "kick some tyres" ?!

I am increasingly impressed now, at the quality of their latest products . . . if still NOT, at the glacial pace at which the (PRC government owned) SAIC company - that own MG - react and respond to market forces and developments :( .

I am always pleased and surprised whenever Mrs RCT(V) shows and interest in, and seems to understand, things in which I am interested.

Whilst we were discussing MG's "ZS EV" electric SUV, I was taken-aback by Mrs RCT(V)'s comment, that she wondered WHY, there was no system of the electric vehicle itself re-charging its own battery !!

It was too close to lunch-time/food, to "go-off" onto one of my "man‘plaining" exercises, into the characteristics of range-extenders (BMW i3), and the more universal regenerative-braking (48v systems), but it is encouraging to know I can return to the subject in the future :) .



It SAIC (ie MG) are slow at reacting to market development then how come they are the fastest growing car brand in several developed countries?

I spent a week driving an MG HS whilst JLR couldn’t source a simple component for my Discovery. Have to say I was impressed. It’s not a great drive and hardly an aspirational car, but as a cheap run around it’s great. Best warranty in Australia too, which is exactly what the market wants.
 
It SAIC (ie MG) are slow at reacting to market development then how come they are the fastest growing car brand in several developed countries . . . ?
More by accident (fortunately !), than by design ;) .

The State owned SAIC corporation (many Company Board members are identified as Party officials), is the opittime (?) of the huge corporate "oil tanker". Changing direction is very difficult, by the nature of its structure.

At least BLMC, GM, etc., could introduce "facelifts", Mark 2s, when it became apparent, it/they were appropriate.

MG were required (forced), to persevere with some pretty dubious styling, and unfortunate market segment choices . . . sometimes (I think) because the production lead-times were so inflexible, sometimes (I suspect) because no-one could, was allowed, to make changes/decisions :( .
 
More by accident (fortunately !), than by design ;) .

The State owned SAIC corporation (many Company Board members are identified as Party officials), is the opittime (?) of the huge corporate "oil tanker". Changing direction is very difficult, by the nature of its structure.

At least BLMC, GM, etc., could introduce "facelifts", Mark 2s, when it became apparent, it/they were appropriate.

MG were required (forced), to persevere with some pretty dubious styling, and unfortunate market segment choices . . . sometimes (I think) because the production lead-times were so inflexible, sometimes (I suspect) because no-one could, was allowed, to make changes/decisions :( .
SIAC must be doing something right; depending on what metic is used, they are roughly the 7th largest car company in the world. They’ve done that from a standing start over 20 years, building a complete supply chain from nothing.

Meanwhile, companies like BLMC and GMs European operations have gone. BLMC, by the way, never delivered what their customers wanted.

A graphic example of this; when you drive up to the motorway here, you drive past a large dealership which used to be Central Coast Holden. Every car on that site was a GM product. Over the last 2-3 years, the Holden bit shrank and other brands came in, including LDV, another SAIC brand. In the last couple of weeks, the Holden signs have all come down. And what’s in its place? MG.
 
SIAC must be doing something right; depending on what metic is used, they are roughly the 7th largest car company in the world. They’ve done that from a standing start over 20 years, building a complete supply chain from nothing.

Meanwhile, companies like BLMC and GMs European operations have gone. BLMC, by the way, never delivered what their customers wanted.

A graphic example of this; when you drive up to the motorway here, you drive past a large dealership which used to be Central Coast Holden. Every car on that site was a GM product. Over the last 2-3 years, the Holden bit shrank and other brands came in, including LDV, another SAIC brand. In the last couple of weeks, the Holden signs have all come down. And what’s in its place? MG.
As soon as pressed "post", I knew you throw-back at me BLMC, and GM ;) !!

I originally said . . .

"I am increasingly impressed now, at the quality of their latest products . . . if still NOT, at the glacial pace at which the (PRC government owned) SAIC company - that own MG - react and respond to market forces and developments".

I do NOT disagree with you . . . SAIC/MG are now successful, but as I subsequently added . . .

"More by accident (fortunately !), than by design ;) ".
 
As soon as pressed "post", I knew you throw-back at me BLMC, and GM ;) !!

I originally said . . .

"I am increasingly impressed now, at the quality of their latest products . . . if still NOT, at the glacial pace at which the (PRC government owned) SAIC company - that own MG - react and respond to market forces and developments".

I do NOT disagree with you . . . SAIC/MG are now successful, but as I subsequently added . . .

"More by accident (fortunately !), than by design ;) ".
I disagree. Their product strategy is deliberate and focused; a simple range of cars at a price that can’t be ignored. Everyone else has gone upmarket.

If anything, they are market makers, not responders to market forces. IMHO this is a classic Chinese long game. Rather than respond to short term trends, they’re quietly building their own market.
 

anglo

LE
I was talking to a bloke today about his Renault EV,
Great says he, suits him as he just goes around Cornwall and Devon,
Then he said, he had to go up country, so, he worked out all the stopping places,
He laughed, and said I rented a car
 
I was talking to a bloke today about his Renault EV,
Great says he, suits him as he just goes around Cornwall and Devon,
Then he said, he had to go up country, so, he worked out all the stopping places,
He laughed, and said I rented a car
Not so daft really though is it? Buy a car that suits your daily driving and hire one for the few occasions it doesn’t. Might be a few less Chelsea tractors on the school run.
 

OneTenner

LE
Book Reviewer
Published by: Jack Warrick, AUTOCAR magazine, on 09 June 2021.

Gridserve acquires Ecotricity Electric Highway EV charging network.

Gridserve will invest heavily in the network, replacing all existing chargers with new tech.

Green energy firm Ecotricity has sold its Electric Highway charging network to sustainable energy business Gridserve.

The Electric Highway was the world’s first national charging network and played an important role in supporting the shift to electric cars in the UK, with chargers installed all over the country.


The sale comes after Gridserve and Ecotricity recently announced a partnership, with the goal of upgrading the UK’s charging infrastructure.

“It’s a real honour for Gridserve to have been chosen by Ecotricity as the organisation to take the Electric Highway forward in its next phase,” said Toddington Harper, Gridserve CEO.

“Our purpose is to deliver sustainable energy and move the needle on climate change, and the upgraded network will provide the confidence for millions more people to make the successful transition to electric vehicles in the earliest possible timeframes,” Harper said.

According to Gridserve, the sale will allow Ecotricity to advance its core green energy business, bringing forward several solar and battery storage projects to be built without government support.

Some Ecotricity innovations include Britain’s first Green Gasmill, which involves making natural gas from grass, and Sky Mining, a carbon capture and storage process that turns carbon dioxide in the atmosphere into diamonds.

Gridserve has already invested heavily in the UK’s charging infrastructure, having opened the country’s first bespoke electric car forecourt in Essex last year. The company said investment will continue, including replacing all existing chargers in the network with more advanced options with contactless payment.

“The Electric Highway needs a growth spurt,” said Dale Vince, Ecotricity founder. “For this, the Electric Highway needs an owner with access to serious funding and real commitment to the cause. I’m delighted to have found the ideal company to hand the baton to, in Gridserve.”

View attachment 580107

See, the problem with that is it looks like a filling station, so is familiar to drivers, except that - depending on the tech in the car - you'll be there for at least 20 minutes, how will that work when there's a queue?
 
A fully-electric coach has found itself stranded in Cornwall after being unable to charge at five different locations across the Duchy.

The Carbon Battle Bus is on a tour of the UK and this week travelled from London to Cornwall but was unable to complete its tour after finding charging points did not work.

As well as the five charging points in Cornwall which could not be used to charge the vehicle there were another five on the journey from London to Cornwall which could not be used.

 
Driving up the M1 today I hot one of those 60MPH limits for air quality. I stuck the cruise on at 60 and a short while later a car passed me. I noticed it was a Tesla, it’s speed being irrelevant to the air quality (but bound by the laws of the road as everyone else).

It did make me think that if everywhere was 60mph limit for air quality - unless you drive an electric vehicle, then the uptake in EVs would be greater.
 

anglo

LE
Driving up the M1 today I hot one of those 60MPH limits for air quality. I stuck the cruise on at 60 and a short while later a car passed me. I noticed it was a Tesla, it’s speed being irrelevant to the air quality (but bound by the laws of the road as everyone else).

It did make me think that if everywhere was 60mph limit for air quality - unless you drive an electric vehicle, then the uptake in EVs would be greater.
Would it induce you to buy one,? I'd have one, but have the slight problem of paying for it
 

Gout Man

LE
Book Reviewer
Would it induce you to buy one,? I'd have one, but have the slight problem of paying for it
Don’t like those Tesla cars but if I could I’d buy the Ford Mustang E car which is now available over here.
 
Published by: Jaguar on 14 JUNE 2021.

HOME CHARGING WALL BOXES: THE EASIEST WAY TO RECHARGE

When it comes to charging your EV, there’s no place like home. Not only is it generally a cheaper way of topping up but more convenient too. Simply plug in your vehicle during the evening – just as you would your mobile phone – and by morning you can be fully charged and ready to go. Recharging at home is most easily achieved with a professionally installed wall box. Typically, this will allow you to charge your BEV or PHEV at a rate of 7kW, enough to fully charge an I‑PACE overnight,* or a PHEV in a couple of hours.* If a home wall box is not an option, then all our BEVs and PHEVs can be recharged using an optional Mode 2 charging cable that simply plugs into a standard three-pin 13amp socket. This will charge your vehicle much more slowly though – at around 2kW.
In this email from the Jaguar Electrifies series we answer frequently asked questions around wall boxes.

Follow link . . .


All useful information, but I'm fed-up with the formatting of their web-site. Arrrgh!!
 

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