What would make you buy an electric car?

I am about to take delivery of a new company car, a Cupra Formentor Hybrid. I currently have a Ford Kuga 2.0 ltr diesel, 95,000 miles on the clock and 3 years old on 6th May. My choice of new company car is two fold, BiK tax being the primary reason. Whilst it churns my stomach and gets me angrier than a pit bull on methadone, paying BiK tax on a car I barely use for private use, it’s unavoidable. But I can significantly reduce how much I pay, currently £167.00 per month, by changing to a hybrid, £73.00 per month for the Cupra.
The second reason I chose a hybrid over a fully electric, petrol or diesel, is because the infrastructure is not in place for a full electric car, my car is parked approximately 100mtrs from my home, legally I am not permitted to run a cable from my home to the car, crossing two public footpaths, down a communal alleyway and across a grass verge, not practical, so the hybrid will be run largely on its 1.4ltr petrol engine, taking advantage of energy charging points when at head office, a supermarket or the few other places that offer the service.
My company offers no incentive to offset the cost of the ever increasing cost of electricity, so I’m not going to go out my way to charge the car at home anyway.
I attended a fleet exhibition at NEC Birmingham a few years ago, there was promise of under road charging, interchangeable battery packs, fast charge batteries (less than 10 minutes), lamppost chargers etc. etc. I have seen little or no evidence of any of the innovations, with 8 years left before ICE cars cease to be manufactured, I find it very hard to believe that this won’t get extended to 3035, or even 2040, we simple won’t be ready as a country to flick a switch overnight, and I haven’t even mentioned the increase load on the National Grid, and the building of power stations, wind farms etc. or the impact building electric cars has on the environment, compared to fossil fuel, the offsetting of carbon etc.
So, I am very sceptical of electric vehicles, and the lack of thought into infrastructure.
 

anglo

LE
I am about to take delivery of a new company car, a Cupra Formentor Hybrid. I currently have a Ford Kuga 2.0 ltr diesel, 95,000 miles on the clock and 3 years old on 6th May. My choice of new company car is two fold, BiK tax being the primary reason. Whilst it churns my stomach and gets me angrier than a pit bull on methadone, paying BiK tax on a car I barely use for private use, it’s unavoidable. But I can significantly reduce how much I pay, currently £167.00 per month, by changing to a hybrid, £73.00 per month for the Cupra.
The second reason I chose a hybrid over a fully electric, petrol or diesel, is because the infrastructure is not in place for a full electric car, my car is parked approximately 100mtrs from my home, legally I am not permitted to run a cable from my home to the car, crossing two public footpaths, down a communal alleyway and across a grass verge, not practical, so the hybrid will be run largely on its 1.4ltr petrol engine, taking advantage of energy charging points when at head office, a supermarket or the few other places that offer the service.
My company offers no incentive to offset the cost of the ever increasing cost of electricity, so I’m not going to go out my way to charge the car at home anyway.
I attended a fleet exhibition at NEC Birmingham a few years ago, there was promise of under road charging, interchangeable battery packs, fast charge batteries (less than 10 minutes), lamppost chargers etc. etc. I have seen little or no evidence of any of the innovations, with 8 years left before ICE cars cease to be manufactured, I find it very hard to believe that this won’t get extended to 3035, or even 2040, we simple won’t be ready as a country to flick a switch overnight, and I haven’t even mentioned the increase load on the National Grid, and the building of power stations, wind farms etc. or the impact building electric cars has on the environment, compared to fossil fuel, the offsetting of carbon etc.
So, I am very sceptical of electric vehicles, and the lack of thought into infrastructure.
So, I am very sceptical of electric vehicles, and the lack of thought into infrastructure.

So am I,
Electric car sales, according to the manufactures, rely on the price of batteries dropping.
But now that's not going to happen, I can't see ICE vehicles being banned in 2030


The car industry’s multibillion-dollar bet on electric vehicles was built on a single premise: that batteries would carry on getting cheaper.

In 2019, Volkswagen executives even brandished charts predicting a steady decline in battery costs, as they laid out their ambition to consign the combustion engine to history.

For years the industry was proved right: battery costs fell from $1,000 per KWH for the first models more than a decade ago to about $130 in 2021, paving the way to making them affordable for middle income families.

The price of these three metals required in a 60KWh battery, enough for a large family sport utility vehicle, has risen from $1,395 a year ago to more than $7,400 in early March, according to battery group Farasis Energy.

 

Blogg

LE
So, I am very sceptical of electric vehicles, and the lack of thought into infrastructure.

So am I,
Electric car sales, according to the manufactures, rely on the price of batteries dropping.
But now that's not going to happen, I can't see ICE vehicles being banned in 2030


The car industry’s multibillion-dollar bet on electric vehicles was built on a single premise: that batteries would carry on getting cheaper.

In 2019, Volkswagen executives even brandished charts predicting a steady decline in battery costs, as they laid out their ambition to consign the combustion engine to history.

For years the industry was proved right: battery costs fell from $1,000 per KWH for the first models more than a decade ago to about $130 in 2021, paving the way to making them affordable for middle income families.

The price of these three metals required in a 60KWh battery, enough for a large family sport utility vehicle, has risen from $1,395 a year ago to more than $7,400 in early March, according to battery group Farasis Energy.


And then there is this small matter:


Now in UK not a problem (yet..) because of crippling levels of fuel taxation.

But of course that tax revenue stream will fall away as IC engined vehicles drop off. And will need to be replaced.

The EV surge in UK is mostly driven at present by company car taxation advantages. That cannot last.
 
But now that's not going to happen, I can't see ICE vehicles being banned in 2030
They are not being banned. The sale of new ones is (allegedly) being banned in 2030. As it stands, you will still be able to buy/sell second hand.
 

Blogg

LE
Either an shit load of companies are buying these cars or individuals are actually moving with the times


There are, via Salary Sacrifice schemes which deliver tax/NIC savings for employee and employer. Coupled with the very low Benefit In Kind charge (2%) makes them an attractive option

My current employer, along with many others, offers a range of EV's as a benefit option for all employees, not just existing company car users.

All leased in via specialist provider.
 
There are, via Salary Sacrifice schemes which deliver tax/NIC savings for employee and employer. Coupled with the very low Benefit In Kind charge (2%) makes them an attractive option

My current employer, along with many others, offers a range of EV's as a benefit option for all employees, not just existing company car users.

All leased in via specialist provider.

I think you will find plenty of individuals are buying them as well.
 

FHA

LE
Regenerative braking doesn’t use the cars conventional friction brakes. The vehicles kinetic energy is used to drive the motor so it acts an alternator. Where friction brakes convert the kinetic energy into heat which is wasted, regenerative braking converts it into electricity which is usable.

You will get far less friction brake wear if you use regenerative braking. I have a mate with a 250,000 km Camry hybrid on its first set of pads.

This one?

AC9983D6-9FAE-47F6-A255-DD3E04A73980.jpeg
 

anglo

LE
There are indeed but the perk car market also driving a large part of the surge.
I think the uncertainty of how much the cost of living is going to rise, will put the damper on car sales
in general, more so the EVs due to their higher price.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
Whilst it churns my stomach and gets me angrier than a pit bull on methadone, paying BiK tax on a car I barely use for private use, it’s unavoidable. But I can significantly reduce how much I pay, currently £167.00 per month
I actually made £10 a month from my last company car. They only had so many automatics on the fleet and I needed one. I ended up driving a 3 series BMW that was 6 months old and two levels below what I was entitled to. The lower car band compensation payment was £0 a month more than the BiK.
 

FHA

LE
There are, via Salary Sacrifice schemes which deliver tax/NIC savings for employee and employer. Coupled with the very low Benefit In Kind charge (2%) makes them an attractive option

My current employer, along with many others, offers a range of EV's as a benefit option for all employees, not just existing company car users.

All leased in via specialist provider.

Might be going down the salary sacrifice route myself, even though I’m not too enamoured at the thought of the milk float on my drive.**
Not been in debt over a car for 30 years now but it only makes sense for me because:

a) Car prices are ridiculous now, post-covid.
b) I’ve got a driveway. Will get a home charger (bugger relying on the network.)
c) Higher rate tax payer: the prices seem a bit high ‘til I run them through my tax calculator. Especially here in Scotland.
d) My Mrs has a petrol car for longer distances (see b)…..)
e) I hand it back at the end.


**It just feels like petrol and diesel cars are/were getting so bloody good.
 
Hello, bob the bullshitter, how's it going my plastic Australian friend
Well any credibility you have on this thread rather depends on what you mean by “my bad”.

Because if you’ve been posting on the false premise that ICE cars are going to be banned in 2030, then everything you’ve posted about cars is based on a false assumption. The government’s prediction (which I posted months ago) is that ICE cars will not reduce to insignificant levels until 2045.

And that massive misunderstanding of the situation would rather question any validity in your interpretation of the grid statistics.

On the other hand, it could be just a typo. Somehow I doubt it.
 

anglo

LE
Well any credibility you have on this thread rather depends on what you mean by “my bad”.

Because if you’ve been posting on the false premise that ICE cars are going to be banned in 2030, then everything you’ve posted about cars is based on a false assumption. The government’s prediction (which I posted months ago) is that ICE cars will not reduce to insignificant levels until 2045.

And that massive misunderstanding of the situation would rather question any validity in your interpretation of the grid statistics.

On the other hand, it could be just a typo. Somehow I doubt it.
Just my bad wording

The government’s prediction (which I posted months ago) is that ICE cars will not reduce to insignificant levels until 2045.
Really, which post was that

My interpretation of the grid statistics, is correct, you made a right twat of yourself there.
 
For sure along with everything else these days electrical supply will go up. Right now though here it’s at $2 per litre and rising. If the supply cost goes up to make my running costs similar to an ICE vehicle now, then the car will be the least of my problems. The house will be a different matter.

Just supercharging right now for $9.79 cost 140kms added so far.
 

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