What would make you buy an electric car?

exbluejob

LE
Book Reviewer
The current wind arrays around the UK are mostly on the North Sea coast because it’s shallow enough to build there. They are therefore susceptible to high pressure weather systems. The next generation of fields will be on the West coast of Scotland and will be massive floating rigs.
Not quite correct because there are more onshore than offshore and the two biggest are on the West coast, Clyde and Whitelees.
 
Low wind conditions over the UK {and Europe} I think the company below are
considered experts on the subject of weather,


View attachment 619603
Our experience covers the whole process chain of a weather service provider: acquisition and processing of weather station data, numerical weather models, radar images, satellite data as well as visualization of meteorological data and the development of customer specific forecasting systems, e.g. PV and wind power forecasts. Data refinement and delivery to the customer is part of the business.


Meteomatics AG comments

The UK generated 25% of its energy from wind power on average in 2020, whereas it now makes up for around 7%, resulting in the UK moving to more costly and carbon-intensive methods, including coal with the national grid firing up coal power plants (which is now providing >2%UK energy).

Whilst a number of factors have brought about the surge in wholesale energy costs, the lack of wind has been a key contributing factor for the surge in electricity prices. Meteomatics has analysed its database (weather forecasts and Meteomatics Energy Models) which shows that there has been a significant drop in wind power generated, and the long-range forecast shows that the lack of wind could continue.

The chart below for wind power production for an offshore wind farm close to London provides an example of the low levels of production throughout September until 28th.
Chart
View attachment 619600


Wind speeds are expected to decrease following the arrival of high pressure this week, whilst the outlook for the rest of October is uncertain. We do expect a general decline in wind speeds before a slow increase towards the end of October (as shown below), which should improve the amount of wind energy production.
Chart

View attachment 619601

But don't take my word for it, read the article yourself


Sorry, I could resist:)
Well I get you couldn’t resist but it’s a bit of a low blow (see what I did there) considering you have Bob on ignore.
 

anglo

LE
Well I get you couldn’t resist but it’s a bit of a low blow (see what I did there) considering you have Bob on ignore.
I said I wouldn't play with him any more, and put him on ignore, and that what I have done,
If he's daft enough to reply to my posts knowing I won't read his crap, then he must be a bigger prat,
than I already know he is
I bet he even replies to this post,
 
I said I wouldn't play with him any more, and put him on ignore, and that what I have done,
If he's daft enough to reply to my posts knowing I won't read his crap, then he must be a bigger prat,
than I already know he is
I bet he even replies to this post,
You both have opinions and each think the other is talking bollocks.

FWIW I like this thread and Find it interesting what you each have to say.

Perhaps it needs its own thread.
 

anglo

LE
You both have opinions and each think the other is talking bollocks.

FWIW I like this thread and Find it interesting what you each have to say.

Perhaps it needs its own thread.
I have no further interest in the Gobshite,
Now let us get back to thread about electric cars {and sometimes wind}:)
 
The point about wind was that the 'green' infrastructure for supporting large numbers of EVs isn't available and even when installed isn't necessarily reliable enough to ensure everyone gets a charge.

Same point can be made for solar. People have known about hydro, waves, and hot-rocks for long enough, yet wind gets the 'green' tax credits in the UK.

Recent announcement: Biggest ever (UK Govt) renewable energy support scheme backed by additional £265 million.

Of the £265M allocated, errm £225M is for offshore wind.
 
The point about wind was that the 'green' infrastructure for supporting large numbers of EVs isn't available and even when installed isn't necessarily reliable enough to ensure everyone gets a charge.

Same point can be made for solar. People have known about hydro, waves, and hot-rocks for long enough, yet wind gets the 'green' tax credits in the UK.

Recent announcement: Biggest ever (UK Govt) renewable energy support scheme backed by additional £265 million.

Of the £265M allocated, errm £225M is for offshore wind.
Slight drift, the jail I work at has just switched on it's solar farm, the first jail in the UK to have one.
The Governor thinks it'll save about £50,000 a year on the leccy bill.
 
I have no further interest in the Gobshite,
Now let us get back to thread about electric cars {and sometimes wind}:)
I know @anglo has me on ignore, but he’s is goading me to reply. But he is resorting to childish insults.

This is a man (?) who has on several occasions since this debate started sought me out an insulted me on other threads to which he has made no other contribution.

It’s not me who has resorted to insults.
 
Slight drift, the jail I work at has just switched on it's solar farm, the first jail in the UK to have one.
The Governor thinks it'll save about £50,000 a year on the leccy bill.

Pity there is no electric chair in the uk then, we could fry the guilty ones for nought
 
Not quite correct because there are more onshore than offshore and the two biggest are on the West coast, Clyde and Whitelees.
I was specifically referring to wet wind farms. The coastal farms and those on land are all susceptible in various degrees to high pressure systems building over land. In deep water off the North coast of Scotland, the wind conditions are much more stable because every low tracking across the Atlantic creates wind. It is only in the last few years that the technology to exploit this has become a commercial reality.

If someone can provide evidence that somehow Atlantic lies aren’t forming, I’ll start believing the no wind claptrap.
 
I was specifically referring to wet wind farms. The coastal farms and those on land are all susceptible in various degrees to high pressure systems building over land. In deep water off the North coast of Scotland, the wind conditions are much more stable because every low tracking across the Atlantic creates wind. It is only in the last few years that the technology to exploit this has become a commercial reality.

If someone can provide evidence that somehow Atlantic lies aren’t forming, I’ll start believing the no wind claptrap.
You're really not taking the hint, are you? It's been demonstrated over and over again that the UK isn't investing enough in the infrastructure required to get power to where it's needed. i.e. to where chargers need to be.

Please start another thread on wind power as a renewable energy and take your bickering elsewhere.
 
You're really not taking the hint, are you? It's been demonstrated over and over again that the UK isn't investing enough in the infrastructure required to get power to where it's needed. i.e. to where chargers need to be.

Please start another thread on wind power as a renewable energy and take your bickering elsewhere.
Just who has demonstrated that the UK isn’t investing enough in the infrastructure required?

Certainly not National Grid plc who repeatedly brief that the infrastructure is adequate when existing continual improvement plans are considered. The only infrastructure gap they identify is on the motorway system, but they’re quite clear that is easy to fix because trunk power routes generally run adjacent to motorways.

They are also pretty bullish that widespread electric car adoption will actually reduce total demand and smooth out peaks in demand. The average first car in a household drives 37 miles a day. The second car 11. That’s not a lot demand (one charge every week or so) and a lot of storage to smooth demand.

But without a significant increase in the renewables capacity, the whole thing is rather pointless. Moving from IC engined cars to electric would improve urban air quality but wouldn’t change carbon footprint. Which is why the wind debate is relevant; the only practical way the UK can move to renewables at the scale required is wind. And by 2030, the UK is planned to have four times the wind capacity it has now and mostly deep offshore.

Interesting factoid about the grid; peak electric demand was in 2002 and has tapered by upwards of 15% since then. The grid can cope.
 

exbluejob

LE
Book Reviewer
Slight drift, the jail I work at has just switched on it's solar farm, the first jail in the UK to have one.
The Governor thinks it'll save about £50,000 a year on the leccy bill.
If they made the prisoners work, like some kind of giant hamster wheel to generate power, then you could export it to the grid :) I know its against their human rights blah blah blah ;-)
 
If they made the prisoners work, like some kind of giant hamster wheel to generate power, then you could export it to the grid :) I know its against their human rights blah blah blah ;-)
ok but it depends what they are charged with
 
resistance is futile said mr AC Mains-Hum,the expert in his field.
no more from me , I have an induction now
 

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