What would make you buy an electric car?

I was trying to do a bit of math here for the F-150 Lightning. With a 150kWh battery, that’d use 0.093 x 150 =$13.95 (US) to charge it at home. Range of 300 miles=4.65 cents a mile. So about 6.3p/mile.

My current diesel truck does 16mpg unless I’m on a run, and diesel’s $2.79/gallon, so 17.3 cents/mile, 24p/mile.

I suppose charging away from home will ramp up the per mile cost, but even so, it’s a lot more efficient.

Given electricity costs in the UK, which frankly blew me away at about 20p/kWh, I can’t see how they’d be viable without solar at home.
 
I was talking to a man with a Mazda hybrid, it as a 1800 engine as well as the electric gubbins,
round town, he gets 70 MPG, but when he goes on motorways, and speeds up70MPH, it drops to around 40 MPG. He's happy with it
Range drops a bit when it’s cold but the biggest thing that affects it is your driving. The acceleration is so bloody addictive but on journeys if you want the most out of it discretion is the key. Letting it self drive as much as you can is a good strategy too
 
I think Tesla are still supporting the supercharger costs and of course it’s part of their schtick that only Tesla’s can use them. Once true fast charging becomes common I’m sure the price will go up. In my photo it shows charging at 637 Km per hour but that drops as it gets going and especially if more charge points are used. If you can do it (I get it some can’t) charging at home is definitely the way to go.
The elephant in the room is fuel duty. Here in Aus, we’re charged 43 cents (~25p) per litre. This is revenue to state governments and some are already introducing a road usage tax for electric cars. It’s not road pricing; I think it’s being charged as part of the registration (it’s not done here in NSW).

Of course, for the UK, duty is much higher (58p per litre plus 20% VAT on the fuel + duty). That’s going to make a huge hole in government revenue. There’ll have to be road pricing.
 
I was trying to do a bit of math here for the F-150 Lightning. With a 150kWh battery, that’d use 0.093 x 150 =$13.95 (US) to charge it at home. Range of 300 miles=4.65 cents a mile. So about 6.3p/mile.

My current diesel truck does 16mpg unless I’m on a run, and diesel’s $2.79/gallon, so 17.3 cents/mile, 24p/mile.

I suppose charging away from home will ramp up the per mile cost, but even so, it’s a lot more efficient.

Given electricity costs in the UK, which frankly blew me away at about 20p/kWh, I can’t see how they’d be viable without solar at home.
You’ve caught the septic. It’s maths FFS!
 
I was trying to do a bit of math here for the F-150 Lightning. With a 150kWh battery, that’d use 0.093 x 150 =$13.95 (US) to charge it at home. Range of 300 miles=4.65 cents a mile. So about 6.3p/mile.

My current diesel truck does 16mpg unless I’m on a run, and diesel’s $2.79/gallon, so 17.3 cents/mile, 24p/mile.

I suppose charging away from home will ramp up the per mile cost, but even so, it’s a lot more efficient.

Given electricity costs in the UK, which frankly blew me away at about 20p/kWh, I can’t see how they’d be viable without solar at home.
Our cheap rate electricity kicks in at 7pm so I set mine to charge from 11pm on. I bet you have off peak too. Charging at home you start every day with a full “tank”.
 
This would be handy for camping or picnicking.

 
Our cheap rate electricity kicks in at 7pm so I set mine to charge from 11pm on. I bet you have off peak too. Charging at home you start every day with a full “tank”.

Actually, no we don’t. It’s a fixed rate round the clock. I absolutely intend to keep the thing plugged in 24x7 when at home so it can do its secondary duty of backup power. I don’t know that a cheap rate tariff would benefit people round here. Mostly the rate is more expensive during the day than a non-split rate tariff, so you’d be paying more during the day, when you want to run your a/c for more than half the year.

I need to do some more maths ( :) ) - solar isn’t very common round here, I suppose because of the relatively cheap leccy. But it might make sense with an EV in the garage.
 
Published by: Sameer Contractor, car-and-bike, on 29 September 2021.

Electric Vehicles Outsell Diesel Passenger Cars In Europe For The First Time.

A total of 151,737 EVs and plug-ins were registered in Europe in August 2021, with sales up by 61 per cent year-on-year, allowing the EV segment to achieve the second-highest ever monthly market share at 21 per cent . . .

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I've been looking into replacing my current car in about 3 years and I'm working on the premise that there won't be many 'normal' cars around by then. I've been pretty interested n the possibility of getting an EV as I've ridden in a few over the past few years and have been impressed by how quiet they are and the acceleration.

However, two recent things have really put me off.

My wife's car is a petrol hybrid and, despite the salesman and manufacturer claims of 80+ mpg, it hasn't bettered 45 in 6 months of driving, and she doesn't drive it hard.

The second thing that has really put me off is my friend's experience. He took delivery of a brand new Vauxhall Zafira electric MPV with a claimed range of 240+ miles. In a month it hasn't managed 140, the worst case being 78 miles and he used to drive Miss Daisy. Plus he's been concerned and frustrated as he struggled to find places to charge it. Of the four he found in the Sheffield area 3 didn't work.
 

tgo

LE
I'm in a not unsimilar position, except 2 yrs rather than 3, I'll be happy to make the move when a 'real' 300-350 mile range, regardless of weather etc is mainstream, I may have to wait until the next 3 yr go, but I remain hopeful.
 
TBH this will make most people mobile.
citroen-ami-ev-goodwood-28022020.jpg

Unfortunately it costs about 2.5k in the UK to obtain one and then the lease costs what you'd pay for petrolium.
It's crap and cheap almost free thereafter.

Tempted and I wonder if someone will DPM wrap it
21-citroen-ami-2020-stationary-side.jpg
 
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I've been looking into replacing my current car in about 3 years and I'm working on the premise that there won't be many 'normal' cars around by then. I've been pretty interested n the possibility of getting an EV as I've ridden in a few over the past few years and have been impressed by how quiet they are and the acceleration.

However, two recent things have really put me off.

My wife's car is a petrol hybrid and, despite the salesman and manufacturer claims of 80+ mpg, it hasn't bettered 45 in 6 months of driving, and she doesn't drive it hard.

The second thing that has really put me off is my friend's experience. He took delivery of a brand new Vauxhall Zafira electric MPV with a claimed range of 240+ miles. In a month it hasn't managed 140, the worst case being 78 miles and he used to drive Miss Daisy. Plus he's been concerned and frustrated as he struggled to find places to charge it. Of the four he found in the Sheffield area 3 didn't work.
There’s a load of smoke and mirrors around hybrids IMHO. The reality is that your daily driving profile has to fit the hybrids optimal duty cycle. In simple words; you have to be able to use the electric range first and then drive on roads where there is plenty of opportunity to top up the batteries by regenerative braking.

If you hit dual carriageway every day near your home without using electric power, drive a hundred miles to an office just off the motorway (my last commute), you’re just driving a petrol car with an big alternator and a heavy battery pack to lug around.

My OH has recently swapped a diesel Discovery Sport for a new hybrid diesel one. The difference in economy is very noticeable; the new one is doing about 150km more on the same sized tank. But she’s driving on country roads, loads of hills and bends to brake for. Not done a long run yet to compare.
 
There’s a load of smoke and mirrors around hybrids IMHO. The reality is that your daily driving profile has to fit the hybrids optimal duty cycle. In simple words; you have to be able to use the electric range first and then drive on roads where there is plenty of opportunity to top up the batteries by regenerative braking.

If you hit dual carriageway every day near your home without using electric power, drive a hundred miles to an office just off the motorway (my last commute), you’re just driving a petrol car with an big alternator and a heavy battery pack to lug around.

My OH has recently swapped a diesel Discovery Sport for a new hybrid diesel one. The difference in economy is very noticeable; the new one is doing about 150km more on the same sized tank. But she’s driving on country roads, loads of hills and bends to brake for. Not done a long run yet to compare.
I drove a Honda hybrid about a decade ago, and i hd a little tamogotchi (sp?) type display which showed you how 'green' you were driving.
Irritating as hell.
An also would lend itself to driving like a mong, annoying all the other road users, so you could get a nice 'score'.
Nice around town, or in commuter traffic, no good on longer trips.
 

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