What would make you buy an electric car?

anglo

LE
You are the one posting nonsense; I’m just calling you out. And you deliberately pinged me to respond to one of those posts. Likewise, you troll me on other threads.

You are quite wrong in your assertion that the grid takes everything it can from turbines because the energy is cheapest. I’ve provided authoritative reference documents from the regulator and the market itself that clearly explain how the market works.

For the avoidance of doubt, base load power is purchased forward on long term contracts. Those contracts are fulfilled first. Wind is purchased spot if available as and when required. Wind power cannot be sold forward. It’s pretty ******* simple.

You’re a reactionary old fart who is too cantankerous to even consider that you might be wrong.
Likewise, you troll me on other threads.

Oh dear, have a cry, let the tears flow,

Wind is purchased spot if available as and when required

So, you admit "if available," when it's not available, I say it's down to,
No wind to drive the turbines
The UK as a period where there is no wind to drive the turbines, which you said couldn't happen,


filed: September 14, 2021 • U.K.
U.K. power surges to record 400 pounds as wind fails to blow

Credit: U.K. Power Surges to Record 400 Pounds as Wind Fails to Blow | By Rachel Morison and Anna Shiryaevskaya | Bloomberg | September 13, 2021 | www.bloomberg.com ~~

Electricity prices soared to a record in Britain as a period of still weather is curbing wind power, exposing the U.K.’s reliance on intermittent renewables.

U.K. power for next day exceed 400 pounds ($553) a megawatt-hour at an auction on Monday, an all-time high. Wind generation is currently below normal, accounting for about 11% of all the electricity entering the grid. That’s leaving the market exposed to swings at a time five nuclear units are offline.

The U.K.’s ability to meet peak demand was already set to shrink this winter as coal and nuclear power stations close early. The outlook has worsened as low wind speeds have forced Britain to rely more on fossil fuels to produce power at a time Europe is facing a shortage of gas and coal prices are surging.

“It does feel that prices are overshooting,” Phil Hewitt, executive director of industry consultant Enappsys Ltd. “Looking ahead, Wednesday and Thursday look even more volatile compared to tomorrow, so we suspect that this is not the end of the high prices for this week.”

Day-ahead power rose to a record 400.01 pounds (468.83 euros) a megawatt-hour on the Epex Spot exchange, and 354.10 pounds on the N2EX market operated by Nord Pool. That’s more than five times the average day-ahead price during the past year on Epex.

The highest-priced hourly contract was a record 1,750 pounds from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. London time on Tuesday on N2EX.

“It’s just like we are not receiving enough renewable production in the U.K.,” said Ogan Kose, a managing director at Accenture. “The expected case would be that renewable production would contribute up to 18-20% of overall electricity generation, this is not happening at least nowadays.”

Prices are so volatile that Epex doubled the price cap for U.K. intraday power to 6,000 pounds a megawatt-hour, according to a notice on Twitter.

The calm weather highlights the shortcomings of Britain’s growing reliance on green energy at a time fossil fuels are also expensive. Wind generation is set to be low this week before finally increasing on Friday, which means “brutal” conditions for prices, according to Enappsys.

U.K. gas futures rose above 150 pence a therm for the first time ever. Low storage levels in Europe and high prices across the U.S. and Asia are driving prices to record levels, with shortages this winter looking increasingly likely.

“Power prices are being driven by high gas prices but when prices start to get really, really high, it’s being driven by scarcity, rather than just the underlying cost of production,” said Marlon Dey, research lead for Great Britain at Aurora Energy Research. “When we have scarcity events and wholesale prices spike, the cost is going to go up for consumers.”

The U.K. is also struggling to count on its nuclear fleet, once a reliable source of low carbon power around the clock. Electricite de France SA has five nuclear units offline, removing about 3,000 megawatts from available generation.

By 2024 five of the U.K.’s eight nuclear plants will be halted permanently. While EDF is building a new atomic station, Hinkley Point C, that won’t be generating until 2026. The government is in talks with EDF about financing for a further station at Sizewell C.

Soaring power prices are also being driven higher by surging costs on cross-border cables, or interconnectors, as competition to secure flows of electricity increases, Enappsys said.


Not only the UK but Europe as well


Europe’s Energy Crisis Worsens As Wind Stops Blowing
Editor OilPrice.com
14 September 2021·2-min read

Energy prices in Europe have hit records due to a shortage of natural gas and much lower than expected wind power output, the Wall Street Journal has reported. Some countries have even been forced to restart coal power plants to ensure enough electricity reaches consumers.

The UK is suffering the most from the drop in wind power output, caused by mild weather. The country, which prides itself on its wind capacity and whose Prime Minister last year said wind farms could power every home by 2030, produced less than 1 GW of wind power on several days. This compares with a generation capacity of 24 GW, according to ICIS senior energy economist Stefan Konstantinov.

Gas prices, meanwhile, are running at record highs because of the asynchrony in demand—spurred by the reopening of EU economies after lockdowns—and supply, which has been constrained because the EU is not the only region where economies are reopening after lockdowns.

Insider reported that wholesale gas prices in Europe had surged by as much as 450 percent over the past year, causing electricity prices in Germany and France to hit records, too.

“It took a lot of people by surprise,” ICIS’ Konstantinov told the Wall Street Journal about the gas crunch. “If this were to happen in winter when we’ve got significantly higher demand, then that presents a real issue for system stability.”

Unfortunately, it could still happen in the winter, depending on whether it turns out to be mild or not.

“People are starting to throw the ‘crisis’ word around when it comes to Europe,” John Kilduff from Again Capital told CNBC. “Europe is squarely behind the eight ball going into the winter season. It’s going to put the focus on this commodity that’s been overlooked for the last several years.”

Gas reserves in Europe are 7.6 percent below the five-year average for this time of year. And there is little hope they will be replenished in time for the start of winter.

 
Last edited:

anglo

LE
Wow the wind turbines are really going right now. 9.25 gw thats nearly half the demand.
It's on its way down again;)

Screenshot 2021-09-23 at 18-43-03 G B National Grid status.png
 

anglo

LE
Things like this make me think the grid is going to be in trouble, the government, and its lackeys are not up to the job

The Government, in their wisdom, chose a "just in time" approach': Energy boss says he 'finally gave up' on building offshore gas storage unit after years of rejection from ministers - leaving UK with seven days' back-up compared to Germany with NINETY days

Who in their right mind would leave a whole country with 7 days supply
 

anglo

LE
Still not bad for today overall though eh 6.72gw and 23.3%. Half combined cycle gas today.
Considering the rated capacity of the UK wind turbines is 24Gw,
it's not impressive
The Government have finally wakened up, and realized the UK needs more
nuclear power plants


Brexit Britain agrees multibillion-pound plan to build new UK nuclear power plant
Ministers are said to be becoming increasingly worried that existing nuclear projects will not provide the power needed to meet Mr Johnson’s Ten Point Plan for a "Green Industrial Revolution" after Brexit.

Business secretary Kwasi Kwarteng is reportedly worried that the amount of nuclear power on the grid will not provide enough energy to allow gas power stations to be phased out by the 2030s, the current Government target.
 
Likewise, you troll me on other threads.

Oh dear, have a cry, let the tears flow,

Wind is purchased spot if available as and when required

So, you admit "if available," when it's not available, I say it's down to,
No wind to drive the turbines
The UK as a period where there is no wind to drive the turbines, which you said couldn't happen,


filed: September 14, 2021 • U.K.
U.K. power surges to record 400 pounds as wind fails to blow

Credit: U.K. Power Surges to Record 400 Pounds as Wind Fails to Blow | By Rachel Morison and Anna Shiryaevskaya | Bloomberg | September 13, 2021 | www.bloomberg.com ~~

Electricity prices soared to a record in Britain as a period of still weather is curbing wind power, exposing the U.K.’s reliance on intermittent renewables.

U.K. power for next day exceed 400 pounds ($553) a megawatt-hour at an auction on Monday, an all-time high. Wind generation is currently below normal, accounting for about 11% of all the electricity entering the grid. That’s leaving the market exposed to swings at a time five nuclear units are offline.

The U.K.’s ability to meet peak demand was already set to shrink this winter as coal and nuclear power stations close early. The outlook has worsened as low wind speeds have forced Britain to rely more on fossil fuels to produce power at a time Europe is facing a shortage of gas and coal prices are surging.

“It does feel that prices are overshooting,” Phil Hewitt, executive director of industry consultant Enappsys Ltd. “Looking ahead, Wednesday and Thursday look even more volatile compared to tomorrow, so we suspect that this is not the end of the high prices for this week.”

Day-ahead power rose to a record 400.01 pounds (468.83 euros) a megawatt-hour on the Epex Spot exchange, and 354.10 pounds on the N2EX market operated by Nord Pool. That’s more than five times the average day-ahead price during the past year on Epex.

The highest-priced hourly contract was a record 1,750 pounds from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. London time on Tuesday on N2EX.

“It’s just like we are not receiving enough renewable production in the U.K.,” said Ogan Kose, a managing director at Accenture. “The expected case would be that renewable production would contribute up to 18-20% of overall electricity generation, this is not happening at least nowadays.”

Prices are so volatile that Epex doubled the price cap for U.K. intraday power to 6,000 pounds a megawatt-hour, according to a notice on Twitter.

The calm weather highlights the shortcomings of Britain’s growing reliance on green energy at a time fossil fuels are also expensive. Wind generation is set to be low this week before finally increasing on Friday, which means “brutal” conditions for prices, according to Enappsys.

U.K. gas futures rose above 150 pence a therm for the first time ever. Low storage levels in Europe and high prices across the U.S. and Asia are driving prices to record levels, with shortages this winter looking increasingly likely.

“Power prices are being driven by high gas prices but when prices start to get really, really high, it’s being driven by scarcity, rather than just the underlying cost of production,” said Marlon Dey, research lead for Great Britain at Aurora Energy Research. “When we have scarcity events and wholesale prices spike, the cost is going to go up for consumers.”

The U.K. is also struggling to count on its nuclear fleet, once a reliable source of low carbon power around the clock. Electricite de France SA has five nuclear units offline, removing about 3,000 megawatts from available generation.

By 2024 five of the U.K.’s eight nuclear plants will be halted permanently. While EDF is building a new atomic station, Hinkley Point C, that won’t be generating until 2026. The government is in talks with EDF about financing for a further station at Sizewell C.

Soaring power prices are also being driven higher by surging costs on cross-border cables, or interconnectors, as competition to secure flows of electricity increases, Enappsys said.


Not only the UK but Europe as well


Europe’s Energy Crisis Worsens As Wind Stops Blowing
Editor OilPrice.com
14 September 2021·2-min read

Energy prices in Europe have hit records due to a shortage of natural gas and much lower than expected wind power output, the Wall Street Journal has reported. Some countries have even been forced to restart coal power plants to ensure enough electricity reaches consumers.

The UK is suffering the most from the drop in wind power output, caused by mild weather. The country, which prides itself on its wind capacity and whose Prime Minister last year said wind farms could power every home by 2030, produced less than 1 GW of wind power on several days. This compares with a generation capacity of 24 GW, according to ICIS senior energy economist Stefan Konstantinov.

Gas prices, meanwhile, are running at record highs because of the asynchrony in demand—spurred by the reopening of EU economies after lockdowns—and supply, which has been constrained because the EU is not the only region where economies are reopening after lockdowns.

Insider reported that wholesale gas prices in Europe had surged by as much as 450 percent over the past year, causing electricity prices in Germany and France to hit records, too.

“It took a lot of people by surprise,” ICIS’ Konstantinov told the Wall Street Journal about the gas crunch. “If this were to happen in winter when we’ve got significantly higher demand, then that presents a real issue for system stability.”

Unfortunately, it could still happen in the winter, depending on whether it turns out to be mild or not.

“People are starting to throw the ‘crisis’ word around when it comes to Europe,” John Kilduff from Again Capital told CNBC. “Europe is squarely behind the eight ball going into the winter season. It’s going to put the focus on this commodity that’s been overlooked for the last several years.”

Gas reserves in Europe are 7.6 percent below the five-year average for this time of year. And there is little hope they will be replenished in time for the start of winter.

Your statement that wind is purchased spot when it’s available is simply not true. It’s purchased spot when it’s required of available. No-one buys something they don’t need or can’t sell.

Do some simple research in to the commercial of the UK energy market (or just think for yourself). It really doesn’t take much thought to realise that it’s simply not possible to sell nuclear energy into the spot market or to allow wind and nuclear to compete with it. They don’t. Nuclear (including French) is bought a year or more in advance. In between are the other base loads. The basis of the deal with France is that the interconnector runs at full capacity. So no, the grid doesn’t buy the cheapest available power.

Read the UK Electricity Market Reform policy documents and the legislation governing the market structure. Stop quoting the first article you find on Google. If you did that you’d understand what I am posting.

As for the continued bollocks about wind not generating, the articles you’ve posted above make it quite clear that wind energy was less than expected, not zero. Research SPARTA (System, Performance, Availability and Reliability Trend Analysis) data and comprehend their metrics.

A snapshot. The two major trends that SPARTA measures are the Capacity Factor which is a simple ratio of the total lifetime energy generated by a turbine or field divided by the total available capacity. The best UK farms are in the low 50s%, the average is 37% for 2020. When you consider that wind turbines don’t generate at night because there’s never a demand, the entire stock is delivering about half it’s connected capacity. It simply couldn’t do that in your fantasy world.

Next, the other significant measure is PBA or Production Based Availability, which measures how well turbines or fields use the actual wind available when they are operating. That one is around 95%. In other words, turbines do near exactly what they are designed to do. The really interesting graphs are when the two measures are combined.

This whole thing is way more complex that you claim. I’ve given you plenty of references both of the legislation, policy and reports from regulators. All you do is post articles by internet journalists with no interpretation.

Final point I’ve never trolled you on Arrse. Where you appear on threads and post drivel or where you specifically refer to “plastic Australian” I’ll call you out.
 

anglo

LE
Your statement that wind is purchased spot when it’s available is simply not true. It’s purchased spot when it’s required of available. No-one buys something they don’t need or can’t sell.

Do some simple research in to the commercial of the UK energy market (or just think for yourself). It really doesn’t take much thought to realise that it’s simply not possible to sell nuclear energy into the spot market or to allow wind and nuclear to compete with it. They don’t. Nuclear (including French) is bought a year or more in advance. In between are the other base loads. The basis of the deal with France is that the interconnector runs at full capacity. So no, the grid doesn’t buy the cheapest available power.

Read the UK Electricity Market Reform policy documents and the legislation governing the market structure. Stop quoting the first article you find on Google. If you did that you’d understand what I am posting.

As for the continued bollocks about wind not generating, the articles you’ve posted above make it quite clear that wind energy was less than expected, not zero. Research SPARTA (System, Performance, Availability and Reliability Trend Analysis) data and comprehend their metrics.

A snapshot. The two major trends that SPARTA measures are the Capacity Factor which is a simple ratio of the total lifetime energy generated by a turbine or field divided by the total available capacity. The best UK farms are in the low 50s%, the average is 37% for 2020. When you consider that wind turbines don’t generate at night because there’s never a demand, the entire stock is delivering about half it’s connected capacity. It simply couldn’t do that in your fantasy world.

Next, the other significant measure is PBA or Production Based Availability, which measures how well turbines or fields use the actual wind available when they are operating. That one is around 95%. In other words, turbines do near exactly what they are designed to do. The really interesting graphs are when the two measures are combined.

This whole thing is way more complex that you claim. I’ve given you plenty of references both of the legislation, policy and reports from regulators. All you do is post articles by internet journalists with no interpretation.

Final point I’ve never trolled you on Arrse. Where you appear on threads and post drivel or where you specifically refer to “plastic Australian” I’ll call you out.
Another load of bullshit
 
Electric scooter in Taiwan.

 
Another load of bullshit
You’re the idiot who can’t see beyond you own Arrse. For **** sake, you’re quoting the Daily Express as a reliable source.

I will continue to call out your ignorant, ill informed bollocks. If you can’t be bothered to understand the structure of the UK energy market, it’s not my loss.
 
Considering the rated capacity of the UK wind turbines is 24Gw,
it's not impressive
The Government have finally wakened up, and realized the UK needs more
nuclear power plants


Brexit Britain agrees multibillion-pound plan to build new UK nuclear power plant
Ministers are said to be becoming increasingly worried that existing nuclear projects will not provide the power needed to meet Mr Johnson’s Ten Point Plan for a "Green Industrial Revolution" after Brexit.

Business secretary Kwasi Kwarteng is reportedly worried that the amount of nuclear power on the grid will not provide enough energy to allow gas power stations to be phased out by the 2030s, the current Government target.
For a "Green industrial revolution", we're building another nuclear power plant.
That must make sense to someone somewhere.
But I'm glad the pennies finally dropped.
 

anglo

LE
You’re the idiot who can’t see beyond you own Arrse. For **** sake, you’re quoting the Daily Express as a reliable source.

I will continue to call out your ignorant, ill informed bollocks. If you can’t be bothered to understand the structure of the UK energy market, it’s not my loss.


There are times when there is no wind to drive the turbines, if this happens in a cold
winter there will be power failures because the UK has little in reserve,
The article below tells of a low wind period not only in the UK, but all across Europe,
it is indisputably due to low wind speeds, {wind speed too low to drive the turbines}
IE, no wind to drive the wind turbines
The wind speed and the output of the wind turbines has FA to do with "structure of the UK energy market",
We are debating, wind speed, and it's effect on the output of the wind turbines,
Not how the grid works or the buying and selling of electricity or any of the other
shit you keep bringing up.

Read the articles below, then tell me it's not due to low wind speed
Ie no wind to drive the turbines

COPENHAGEN/FRANKFURT, Aug 12 (Reuters) - Orsted (ORSTED.CO) and RWE (RWEG.DE), the world's two largest offshore wind players, both suffered from lighter winds in the first half of the year, highlighting how profits in the booming industry remain tied to weather conditions.

Denmark's Orsted said wind speeds in the April-June period were "significantly lower than normal" and ranked among the worst three quarters in over more than 20 years.



When the wind stops blowing, the UK struggles to make cheap & green electricity​


It’s all over the news at the moment about how energy prices are rising linked to increased worldwide demand on gas reserves. Part of the reason for the increased demand for gas in Europe is less output from wind turbines recently, due to a lack of wind. Calm conditions has meant wind power over the last few weeks has only made up about 7% of the U.K.'s electricity generation. This is compared to 18% for the whole of the months of August and May and 26% in February. This has meant more electricity has to be generated using gas-fired power stations to fill the gap and, also to a lesser extent, from coal-fired power stations too.
 
There are times when there is no wind to drive the turbines, if this happens in a cold
winter there will be power failures because the UK has little in reserve,
The article below tells of a low wind period not only in the UK, but all across Europe,
it is indisputably due to low wind speeds, {wind speed too low to drive the turbines}
IE, no wind to drive the wind turbines
The wind speed and the output of the wind turbines has FA to do with "structure of the UK energy market",
We are debating, wind speed, and it's effect on the output of the wind turbines,
Not how the grid works or the buying and selling of electricity or any of the other
shit you keep bringing up.

Read the articles below, then tell me it's not due to low wind speed
Ie no wind to drive the turbines

COPENHAGEN/FRANKFURT, Aug 12 (Reuters) - Orsted (ORSTED.CO) and RWE (RWEG.DE), the world's two largest offshore wind players, both suffered from lighter winds in the first half of the year, highlighting how profits in the booming industry remain tied to weather conditions.

Denmark's Orsted said wind speeds in the April-June period were "significantly lower than normal" and ranked among the worst three quarters in over more than 20 years.



When the wind stops blowing, the UK struggles to make cheap & green electricity​


It’s all over the news at the moment about how energy prices are rising linked to increased worldwide demand on gas reserves. Part of the reason for the increased demand for gas in Europe is less output from wind turbines recently, due to a lack of wind. Calm conditions has meant wind power over the last few weeks has only made up about 7% of the U.K.'s electricity generation. This is compared to 18% for the whole of the months of August and May and 26% in February. This has meant more electricity has to be generated using gas-fired power stations to fill the gap and, also to a lesser extent, from coal-fired power stations too.
**** me. Wind turbine generators were paid more than £1.8M last week to NOT generate. Explain that. You can’t. It destroys your argument.

You cannot use Denmark, Germany or any other country to prove your point. They do not operate the same market. Nor can you use any of the journalise you post to prove that there are extensive periods when UK turbines. Not one of them says anything other than that wind power was less than predicted.

Your last post called me out for “more bullshit” when I drew your attention to SPARTA. That’s the ******* industry analyst. You’re the one who claimed that a career in the power industry led to your expertise; you’d know that of course. Except you retired 17 years ago.

You bellthronk.
 

anglo

LE
**** me. Wind turbine generators were paid more than £1.8M last week to NOT generate. Explain that. You can’t. It destroys your argument.

You cannot use Denmark, Germany or any other country to prove your point. They do not operate the same market. Nor can you use any of the journalise you post to prove that there are extensive periods when UK turbines. Not one of them says anything other than that wind power was less than predicted.

Your last post called me out for “more bullshit” when I drew your attention to SPARTA. That’s the ******* industry analyst. You’re the one who claimed that a career in the power industry led to your expertise; you’d know that of course. Except you retired 17 years ago.

You bellthronk.
"You cannot use Denmark, Germany or any other country to prove your point. They do not operate the same market. Nor can you use any of the journalise you post to prove that there are extensive periods when UK turbines. Not one of them says anything other than that wind power was less than predicted".

. Not one of them says anything other than that wind power was less than predicted"

Calm conditions has meant wind power over the last few weeks has only made up about 7% of the U.K.'s electricity generation. This is compared to 18% for the whole of the months of August and May and 26% in February

******************************************************************************************************************
Are you saying that all the people that are writing articles in links I've given are wrong, and that you are right, are you also saying that there have been no low conditions in the UK over the past few
weeks, All over Europe as well
There is even a quote from Mads Nipper, chief govt of the Danish group, Orsted
stating the wind is low.
Is he wrong to
Like I said, " no wind to drive the wind turbines"


Which part of the statements below are wrong

It’s all over the news at the moment about how energy prices are rising linked to increased worldwide demand on gas reserves. Part of the reason for the increased demand for gas in Europe is less output from wind turbines recently, due to a lack of wind. Calm conditions has meant wind power over the last few weeks has only made up about 7% of the U.K.'s electricity generation. This is compared to 18% for the whole of the months of August and May and 26% in February. This has meant more electricity has to be generated using gas-fired power stations to fill the gap and, also to a lesser extent, from coal-fired power stations too.

COPENHAGEN/FRANKFURT, Aug 12 (Reuters) - Orsted (ORSTED.CO) and RWE (RWEG.DE), the world's two largest offshore wind players, both suffered from lighter winds in the first half of the year, highlighting how profits in the booming industry remain tied to weather conditions.
Denmark's Orsted said wind speeds in the April-June period were "significantly lower than normal" and ranked among the worst three quarters in over more than 20 years.

Mads Nipper, chief govt of the Danish group, advised the Financial Times that April, May and June had been the third-worst quarter for wind previously 22 years within the North Sea, the place Orsted has most of its wind farms.
“Out of 88 quarters on record, it is an extraordinarily poor wind quarter,” Nipper mentioned. “It is very serious. It is like you’re a farmer and it doesn’t rain.”
Low wind speeds have affected a number of European corporations lively in renewable power together with SSE within the UK and RWE in Germany.
 
Last edited:
"You cannot use Denmark, Germany or any other country to prove your point. They do not operate the same market. Nor can you use any of the journalise you post to prove that there are extensive periods when UK turbines. Not one of them says anything other than that wind power was less than predicted".

. Not one of them says anything other than that wind power was less than predicted"

Calm conditions has meant wind power over the last few weeks has only made up about 7% of the U.K.'s electricity generation. This is compared to 18% for the whole of the months of August and May and 26% in February

******************************************************************************************************************
Are you saying that all the people that are writing articles in links I've given are wrong, and that you are right, are you also saying that there have been no low conditions in the UK over the past few
weeks, All over Europe as well
There is even a quote from Mads Nipper, chief govt of the Danish group, Orsted
stating the wind is low.
Is he wrong to
Like I said, " no wind to drive the wind turbines"


Which part of the statements below are wrong

It’s all over the news at the moment about how energy prices are rising linked to increased worldwide demand on gas reserves. Part of the reason for the increased demand for gas in Europe is less output from wind turbines recently, due to a lack of wind. Calm conditions has meant wind power over the last few weeks has only made up about 7% of the U.K.'s electricity generation. This is compared to 18% for the whole of the months of August and May and 26% in February. This has meant more electricity has to be generated using gas-fired power stations to fill the gap and, also to a lesser extent, from coal-fired power stations too.

COPENHAGEN/FRANKFURT, Aug 12 (Reuters) - Orsted (ORSTED.CO) and RWE (RWEG.DE), the world's two largest offshore wind players, both suffered from lighter winds in the first half of the year, highlighting how profits in the booming industry remain tied to weather conditions.
Denmark's Orsted said wind speeds in the April-June period were "significantly lower than normal" and ranked among the worst three quarters in over more than 20 years.

Mads Nipper, chief govt of the Danish group, advised the Financial Times that April, May and June had been the third-worst quarter for wind previously 22 years within the North Sea, the place Orsted has most of its wind farms.
“Out of 88 quarters on record, it is an extraordinarily poor wind quarter,” Nipper mentioned. “It is very serious. It is like you’re a farmer and it doesn’t rain.”
Low wind speeds have affected a number of European corporations lively in renewable power together with SSE within the UK and RWE in Germany.
Your entire case is blown out of the water by the fact that over the last few weeks the UK grid has routinely been paying wind operators to NOT generate. Conveniently, you are ignoring that. Not once in your references, does it say that there was NO wind power.

As for Denmark and Germany, they have an entirely different energy market and mix of generation. Germany has no nuclear, Denmark has a lot of CHP. Both rely almost entirely on gas for their base load generating. And, from a wind perspective, they both have predominantly onshore wind.

Neither directly face the Atlantic and it’s train of low pressure systems; the North Sea has quite different prevailing weather in summer and autumn to the Atlantic due to enduring summer highs over Germany and Central Europe.

Mr Nipper makes it clear that wind conditions in the North Sea have been lower than the previous 22 years. He doesn’t ******* mention the Atlantic. You should read and understand the articles you quote.
 

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