What would make you buy an electric car?

anglo

LE
Talking of EVs, if one of the present generations of EVs get past the warranty period,
and the battery fails, would it be viable to put in a new battery, or would the car be scrapped?
Would failure of other components lead to scrapping the car,
IE, the dashboard display
Anybody like to venture the cost of repairs to an EV
 

4(T)

LE
Talking of EVs, if one of the present generations of EVs get past the warranty period,
and the battery fails, would it be viable to put in a new battery, or would the car be scrapped?
Would failure of other components lead to scrapping the car,
IE, the dashboard display
Anybody like to venture the cost of repairs to an EV


Regardless of the practical viability of EVs, they are going to have to change "form factor" quite dramatically.

Currently EVs are a bit like "horseless carriages", built as modifications of- or to imitate the shape of- the ICE vehicles they replace. It seems to me that the architecture of some popular models is quite bodged and illogical from a design point of view.

I'm pretty sure that if batteries are to be replaced, hot-swapped, repaired, have commonality, or even spares kept, then the typical EV vehicle design will have to resemble something like a minivan - a detachable slab battery sat in a frame between the front and rear wheels, with the passenger compartment sat on top. Vehicles will be taller and shorter - more box like.
 

anglo

LE
Regardless of the practical viability of EVs, they are going to have to change "form factor" quite dramatically.

Currently EVs are a bit like "horseless carriages", built as modifications of- or to imitate the shape of- the ICE vehicles they replace. It seems to me that the architecture of some popular models is quite bodged and illogical from a design point of view.

I'm pretty sure that if batteries are to be replaced, hot-swapped, repaired, have commonality, or even spares kept, then the typical EV vehicle design will have to resemble something like a minivan - a detachable slab battery sat in a frame between the front and rear wheels, with the passenger compartment sat on top. Vehicles will be taller and shorter - more box like.
I agree with what you say, but I asked
Talking of EVs, if one of the present generations of EVs get past the warranty period,
and the battery fails, would it be viable to put in a new battery, or would the car be scrapped?
 
I agree with what you say, but I asked
Talking of EVs, if one of the present generations of EVs get past the warranty period,
and the battery fails, would it be viable to put in a new battery, or would the car be scrapped?
Depends on what will be the cost comparisons . . . of the battery (replacement), and the value of the rest of the vehicle.

As now, if an ICE engine fails, do you replace (just) the engine, or scrap the whole vehicle ?!

If you prang the vehicle body work, I am sure a market will have developed for serviceable, reusable batteries.

If the battery fails, I am sure it will be possible to replace it . . . or the individual drive motors, instruments, etc., as now.
 
Not just the cost of parts either. A competent mechanic could swap batteries much more cheaply than a main dealership (aka 'stearlership') provided the parts aren't coded to prevent ersatz repairs.

Follow the money again....
 

giatttt

War Hero
Regardless of the practical viability of EVs, they are going to have to change "form factor" quite dramatically.

Currently EVs are a bit like "horseless carriages", built as modifications of- or to imitate the shape of- the ICE vehicles they replace. It seems to me that the architecture of some popular models is quite bodged and illogical from a design point of view.

I'm pretty sure that if batteries are to be replaced, hot-swapped, repaired, have commonality, or even spares kept, then the typical EV vehicle design will have to resemble something like a minivan - a detachable slab battery sat in a frame between the front and rear wheels, with the passenger compartment sat on top. Vehicles will be taller and shorter - more box like.

The three box model will survive simply to provide the necessary crumple zones. Might mean you have a Porsche style luggage compartment at the front in addition to the boot.

It can be down differently: the original A class mercedes was designed such that the engine would be driven down under the passenger compartment in any crash and thus provide similar levels of protect as a traditional layout.
 

Longlenny

War Hero
Book Reviewer
Talking of EVs, if one of the present generations of EVs get past the warranty period,
and the battery fails, would it be viable to put in a new battery, or would the car be scrapped?
Would failure of other components lead to scrapping the car,
IE, the dashboard display
Anybody like to venture the cost of repairs to an EV
A chap I spoke to at the weekend had an ev come back under warranty with a battery failure, cost 11k for a new one.
 
A chap I spoke to at the weekend had an ev come back under warranty with a battery failure, cost 11k for a new one.

Once EV's are the norm you will be able to get a cheap Chinese battery off eBay for a fraction of the cost.



Your car might burst in to flames or exploits while charging, but hay ho....
 

Chef

LE
Once EV's are the norm you will be able to get a cheap Chinese battery off eBay for a fraction of the cost.



Your car might burst in to flames or exploits while charging, but hay ho....
I should imagine the manufacturers have already though of that, a lot of stuff has to be OE else the car computers won't talk to the replacement.
 
Published by: Jack Warrick, AUTOCAR magaizn, on 22 July 2021.

Shell to install 800 EV chargers at Waitrose shops by 2025.


Project will increase the total number of Shell Recharge points in the UK eight-fold.

Multinational energy company Shell will install 800 electric vehicle chargers at Waitrose shops in by 2025, increasing its number of chargers almost eight-fold in the UK.

Around 100 Waitrose shops will gain Shell Recharge stations, with each site expected to receive six 22kW chargers and two 50kW rapid chargers.

The first installation is expected to take place early next year, in a move to create what Shell terms 'destination charging', where customers charge their EVs at a location they’re primarily visiting for an activity, such as shopping.

“This is great news for EV drivers across the UK, knowing they can easily, quickly and reliably charge up at Shell charge points while shopping at Waitrose,” said Bernadette Williamson, the general manager of Shell UK Retail. “We want to make EV charging as hassle-free as possible and support our customers wherever they want to charge.”

The partnership will also result in the number of Shell forecourt shops selling Waitrose food increase from 57 to 125 by 2025.

“We're also delighted to bring our customers 800 new charging points for electric vehicles, including new rapid charging capabilities, as the UK moves more and more towards a sustainable transport network,” said Waitrose executive director James Bailey.

There are 108 Shell Recharge points located across the UK, with almost half located in London.

Shell recently acquired EV charging company Ubitricity and has set itself a goal of installing a total of 5000 charge points on forecourts and other locations by 2025.

1626975540088.png


https://www.autocar.co.uk/.../shell-install-800-ev...
 
Yes you are, I don't think you understand where I'm coming from.

7KW is the most you can charge with at home with a single phase supply, which is empty-full in about 8 hours with the average modern battery and on board AC-DC rectifier.

22KW is what you could achieve at home by upgrading to a 3 phase supply, which would be much quicker, but crucially, means a household with two electric cars, which will eventually be the norm, could charge both overnight in 5-6 hours.

You are probably right, I don’t get where you are coming from. I have a regular 100amp single phase supply and charge at home each night without drama. When Mrs Gouty gets an EV (or maybe we will share by then) we will charge one after the other, again no problem.

We won’t need three phase.
 
West Country uk
A great deal of ourr supply network is from the 1920s-1940s era but the cables are of excellent quality, however continual building work means the system is straining, on Monday we had a massive blackout due to a sub station overheating and high power loading
Also our streets are narrow, not laid out in a grid, many of the underground cables pass through private property, and some have been covered with new buildings
But I am sure a system will be worked out, but who is going to pay for the infrastructure?
Part of the Tesla allure is access to their superchargers which I believe are installed and owned by them. I would presume whatever the fuel companies morph into will want a piece of the charging market, as will other independents. Getting that infrastructure in place will be a race as things change over. I think in time most charging will take place at home or nearby overnight anyway.
I loved the West Country and spent a lot of time there growing up.
 
who is going to pay for the infrastructure?

Why worry future Generations will be saddled with all the debt,
the people who create this debt won't be around to pay the bill,
no matter what we do, the end result will be the same,
the demise of the human race
The simple truth is, there is to many people on the planet
So you are saying the changeover to EV’s has doomed the human race.

I know you don’t like it but is there nothing really good about it at all.
 
Talking of EVs, if one of the present generations of EVs get past the warranty period,
and the battery fails, would it be viable to put in a new battery, or would the car be scrapped?
Would failure of other components lead to scrapping the car,
IE, the dashboard display
Anybody like to venture the cost of repairs to an EV
As the overall vehicle cost comes down I think maintenance will also. It will also be different with not so much running costs (no oil changes, not much brake maintenance etc) but more expensive single items. It’s tough to compare but we run a fleet of vans, still some Mercedes Sprinters (changing to Transits) and the Mercs have turned into the proverbial “triggers brooms” over 5 years or so.
 

anglo

LE
So you are saying the changeover to EV’s has doomed the human race.

I know you don’t like it but is there nothing really good about it at all.
The move to EVs as nothing to do with the demise of the human race
to many people on the planet, is what will end the human race.
I have no problem with the move to EVs, as I've stated before,
I would love a EV, it would suit me down to the ground,
It's just the way we're going about implementing it,
Take the Grid, we're going green is the shout, We have nuclear plants,
half are about to be shutdown, and some are not built yet,
we've always got wind turbines, they have not supplied above 5GW
for the last month, today were down to a record low,
they opened a coal plant today, normally run in winter.
We have the Gas plants which are the backbone at the moment
And they are on about shutting the gas plants to go frecking green.
This grid is supposed to support us going completely electric,
BUT BUT we'll have a SMART GRID says them,
when, it's going to take years to get that up and running
It's not the fact that we're going all electric that bugs me
it's the way it's being done
 

anglo

LE

Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer
A couple of our local cretins nicked a Tesla ?
broke in to a property and got hold of the fob

the trouble is Teslas talk to the iron chicken in the sky
the owner passed the data to the police, they watched the signal from the iron chicken in the sky , and knew it would run out of power soon, it was only a quarter charged
they even knew roughly where it would stop, saved all that racing about with blue light !
stopped in the middle of nowhere, so the lads could not leg it
 

theinventor

War Hero
Yes you are, I don't think you understand where I'm coming from.

7KW is the most you can charge with at home with a single phase supply, which is empty-full in about 8 hours with the average modern battery and on board AC-DC rectifier.

22KW is what you could achieve at home by upgrading to a 3 phase supply, which would be much quicker, but crucially, means a household with two electric cars, which will eventually be the norm, could charge both overnight in 5-6 hours.

If you're in a household where both of you regularly need to do 250 miles tomorrow, you're probably living in the wrong place.
 

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