What would make you buy an electric car?

I disagree. Statistically it’s very uncommon for a car sold in southern Spain to end up in Sweden. It’s actually statistically uncommon for a car sold in London to end up in Glasgow.
Also don't confuse sales with manufacturing. Your car may be built in Spain, or the Czech Republic, or China and sold all over the world. Fitting the same pack to them all simplifies not only this process, but also the certification process worldwide.
 

Fr SpodoKomodo

Old-Salt
We're, once again, back to the VHS betamax situation. I can't see the various manufacturers cooperating until some are trapped like rats. Another thing is that in UK there are already something like 8 electricity providers for EV points, you need the correct APP or card for each one, there is no cross pollination.

This will be a problem I think there should be government intervention in eventually. Currently, from what I've read, you not only need those separate apps and cards, but crucially, you often need to be a registered member with the provider and pay an annual membership fee. A lot of the online mapping products that show you where chargers are also have paid membership for access schemes.

We can all see how that would end up working in rip off Britain. A cartel of private businesses shutting up shop and making people cough up a year on year increasing annual 'service fee' to be allowed to use that specific brand of charger, in the same dystopian way you'd have to register with BP or Texaco now for the pump to operate.

Unless you upgrade your house to a 3 phase supply at the cost of a few grand the best you're going to be able to do at home is 7KW AC overnight charging which is slow. They'll have the consumers pants down with access fees for those hundreds of kilowatt DC rapid chargers on top of the cost of the charge itself unless there's fair use legislation to stop the inevitable profiteering.
 
a lot more on the road.

Cornwall is full to overflow at the moment, camper vans are everywhere, the campsites are full.
There are no houses available to rent. and that's a first for Cornwall
People are moving into Cornwall by the thousand, they say they are moving for a better life,
the numbers moving in are destroying that dream,
Cornwall as changed forever,
It's going to be hell to charge a EV
We went to Cornwall last year with friends in a very nice holiday cottage, £280 per couple.
They wanted nearly a grand per couple this year. No way.
 
Published by: Jack Warrick, AUTOCAR magazine, on 13 July 2021.

Israeli EV start-up partners with major US bodywork supplier.

Tel-Aviv-based REE has also launched a configurator on which customers can create bespoke vehicles.

Israeli start-up REE has partnered with a major US commercial-vehicle bodywork supplier as it targets the e-mobility market with a new platform.

EAVX, owned by JB Poindexter, will collaborate with the firm to develop commercial electric work trucks, which the firm says will be “best-in-class and zero-emissions".


REE has also launched an online configurator on which customers can design their own bespoke vehicles, including driven-axle and steering options, top speed, maximum payload, battery capacity and physical dimensions.

REE and EAVX will initially collaborate on a "next-generation" walk-in van for the US delivery market, with further collaboration to target additional North American commercial work truck customers and markets.

Long-term goals are aimed towards electric passenger and school buses, trucks and delivery vehicles. The joint project will aim for the first quarter of 2022, with production targeted for 2024.

“This collaboration is an important step forward for REE’s business growth – and for improving liveability and quality of life by eliminating carbon emissions,” said REE CEO Daniel Barel.

“JB Poindexter is the leader in commercial work truck bodies and accessories. They're the ideal partner to help propel EV adoption in the commercial market segment.

“REE is dedicated to partnering with manufacturers that will push boundaries, and this collaboration helps put us on the fast track to fulfilling our vision of serving as the cornerstone of next-gen EVs."

The two companies will work together with REE’s modular EV platform, which consists of a flat, skateboard-style chassis with steering, braking, suspension and electric motor components located inside each wheel arch. The firm says its shape allows for a lower step-in height, a higher maximum payload capacity and further room for passengers.

No details of any UK-specific vehicles were revealed, but it was announced last year that REE would open a centre of excellence at the MIRA Technology Park near Nuneaton in Warwickshire, creating 200 highly skilled jobs.

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Also don't confuse sales with manufacturing. Your car may be built in Spain, or the Czech Republic, or China and sold all over the world. Fitting the same pack to them all simplifies not only this process, but also the certification process worldwide.
Which ignores the fact that manufacturers put multiple different configurations of the same car down a line and have different configurations of the same car for different countries.
 

964ST

War Hero
It would be a bit of a downer if electric power companies put up their prices due to the demand of electric vehicles!?

Oh but the will, for All consumers not just eco compliant peeps.
 
Which ignores the fact that manufacturers put multiple different configurations of the same car down a line and have different configurations of the same car for different countries.
They do, but standardisation at the component level is in the manufacturers interest. Better to have a standard battery pack that can be configured differently than to have multiple different specifications.
 
Pubished by: Joe Holding, AUTOCAR magazine, on 15 July 2021.

Planning application submitted for Coventry EV battery factory.

Firms behind proposals say facility could boost regional economy by £434 million and create 6000 jobs.

A planning application for a battery gigafactory situated at Coventry Airport has been submitted, with the result set to be decided by Warwick District Council and Coventry City Council later this year.


The plan was submitted by a newly formed joint venture partnership between Coventry City Council and Coventry Airport, which claim the proposals would deliver 5.7 million square feet of space for EV battery production and recycling, adding £434 million in gross value to the regional economy.

The proposal also claims that 6000 new jobs will be created, with tens of thousands added to the supply chain, and that the factory will be powered by 100% green energy, including solar and wind power.
The applicants say too that Coventry Airport is an ideal location for an EV battery factory, because it's adjacent to the UK Battery Industrialisation Centre, which is the UK’s largest battery research centre.

“It's mission critical that the West Midlands secures a gigafactory, both for the future of our region’s automotive industry and the huge economic and job benefits it would bring, as well as the future of our planet,” said West Midlands mayor Andy Street.

“The West Midlands is already home to the country’s biggest car manufacturer, Europe’s largest research centre of its kind, the UK’s only battery industrialisation centre and a world-leading supply chain. A gigafactory therefore is the natural next step for the UK’s automotive heartland, and I will not rest until we have secured one."

The proposed factory has also been backed by local MPs, Warwick District Council, Warwickshire County Council, the West Midlands Combined Authority and the Coventry and Warwickshire Local Enterprise Partnership.

The plans come as Nissan also recently announced it would produce EV batteries in Sunderland, while start-up company Britishvolt plans to open its own gigafactory in Blyth, Northumberland, in 2023.

A third of all cars produced in the UK are produced in the West Midlands by companies including Aston Martin, BMW and Jaguar Land Rover.

The UK government plans to ban the sale of new petrol and diesel cars from 2030, and with car makers increasingly switching to EVs to reduce emissions, the need for an EV battery factory in this country is growing rapidly.

The government has also faced increasing pressure to support the development of EV battery production, following reports from the Confederation of British Industry and the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders that called for progress before the UK potentially falls behind European competitors.

“Coventry has emerged as a world-leader in battery technology,” said Coventry City Council leader George Duggins. “The city is home to the UK Battery Industrialisation Centre [and] world-leading research institutions, and it’s clear to me that Coventry is the right location.

“Coventry Airport sits at the heart of this powerful automotive research cluster and is the obvious location for a UK gigafactory. Our joint-venture partnership is unique in the UK, and it creates a strong platform to attract investment and deliver more than 4000 new jobs, support our automotive sector and secure our competitive advantage.”

No timescale has been placed on the construction of the Coventry battery factory, although project bosses are hoping that it will be operational by 2025.

1626355407737.png



Posted on the "manufacturing-in-the-uk" thread, and on also this "what-would-make-you-buy-an-electric-car" thread.
 
Pubished by: Joe Holding, AUTOCAR magazine, on 15 July 2021.

Planning application submitted for Coventry EV battery factory.

Firms behind proposals say facility could boost regional economy by £434 million and create 6000 jobs.

A planning application for a battery gigafactory situated at Coventry Airport has been submitted, with the result set to be decided by Warwick District Council and Coventry City Council later this year.


The plan was submitted by a newly formed joint venture partnership between Coventry City Council and Coventry Airport, which claim the proposals would deliver 5.7 million square feet of space for EV battery production and recycling, adding £434 million in gross value to the regional economy.

The proposal also claims that 6000 new jobs will be created, with tens of thousands added to the supply chain, and that the factory will be powered by 100% green energy, including solar and wind power.
The applicants say too that Coventry Airport is an ideal location for an EV battery factory, because it's adjacent to the UK Battery Industrialisation Centre, which is the UK’s largest battery research centre.

“It's mission critical that the West Midlands secures a gigafactory, both for the future of our region’s automotive industry and the huge economic and job benefits it would bring, as well as the future of our planet,” said West Midlands mayor Andy Street.

“The West Midlands is already home to the country’s biggest car manufacturer, Europe’s largest research centre of its kind, the UK’s only battery industrialisation centre and a world-leading supply chain. A gigafactory therefore is the natural next step for the UK’s automotive heartland, and I will not rest until we have secured one."

The proposed factory has also been backed by local MPs, Warwick District Council, Warwickshire County Council, the West Midlands Combined Authority and the Coventry and Warwickshire Local Enterprise Partnership.

The plans come as Nissan also recently announced it would produce EV batteries in Sunderland, while start-up company Britishvolt plans to open its own gigafactory in Blyth, Northumberland, in 2023.

A third of all cars produced in the UK are produced in the West Midlands by companies including Aston Martin, BMW and Jaguar Land Rover.

The UK government plans to ban the sale of new petrol and diesel cars from 2030, and with car makers increasingly switching to EVs to reduce emissions, the need for an EV battery factory in this country is growing rapidly.

The government has also faced increasing pressure to support the development of EV battery production, following reports from the Confederation of British Industry and the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders that called for progress before the UK potentially falls behind European competitors.

“Coventry has emerged as a world-leader in battery technology,” said Coventry City Council leader George Duggins. “The city is home to the UK Battery Industrialisation Centre [and] world-leading research institutions, and it’s clear to me that Coventry is the right location.

“Coventry Airport sits at the heart of this powerful automotive research cluster and is the obvious location for a UK gigafactory. Our joint-venture partnership is unique in the UK, and it creates a strong platform to attract investment and deliver more than 4000 new jobs, support our automotive sector and secure our competitive advantage.”

No timescale has been placed on the construction of the Coventry battery factory, although project bosses are hoping that it will be operational by 2025.

View attachment 589022


Posted on the "manufacturing-in-the-uk" thread, and on also this "what-would-make-you-buy-an-electric-car" thread.
Despite Brexit.
 
Published by: Jack Warrick, AUTOCAR magazine, on 16 July 2021,

BMW tests vehicle-to-grid EV charging scheme with i3 fleet.

Customers' i3s have been equipped with new technology to turn them into ‘mobile energy storage devices’.

BMW customers are testing bi-directional EV charging as part of a three-year project, enabling drivers to charge their cars as normal, with the added benefit of returning energy into the power grid when required
.

A group of 20 customers in Germany have been given BMW i3 electric cars equipped with the new technology, and an additional 30 are set to be delivered to business users over the next few weeks.

1626708059089.png


“During periods of particularly high demand for electricity, these vehicles are able to feed additional power into the grid, while their high-voltage batteries are mainly charged at times when electricity from renewable sources is available or overall demand is lower,” said BMW.

“The stored energy can, in turn, be deployed exactly when needed, whether for electric driving or boosting power grid capacity."

The pilot scheme aims to develop technological solutions for making electric mobility easier and cheaper for users, with lower emissions.

BMW hopes it will turn electric cars into ‘mobile energy storage devices’ that can supply electricity to the grid when needed.

“By adopting a holistic approach, the project aims to interlink vehicles, charging infrastructure and power grids for the first time in a way that facilitates the use of renewable energy – and at the same time increases power supply reliability,” the firm said.

Those taking part in the pilot scheme will also benefit from a new technology package. This consists of new in-vehicle and backend technology developed by BMW; an intelligent charging wallbox from Kostal; and the networking for interconnecting the electric car, wallbox and electrical installation in the customer’s building with the power grid from energy firms Bayernwerk, KEO and Tennet.

BMW says the scheme is needed due to the growing need to control energy flows and consumption as the number of electric vehicles increases.

Other firms are also investing in vehicle-to-grid technology, including Audi, Fiat, Nissan and Renault.

1626708011468.png


 
Published by: Autocar magazine, on 19 July 2021.

How the government plans to steer UK transport to net-zero by 2030.

In an exclusive interview with Autocar, transport decarbonisation minister Rachel Maclean discusses limiting new ICE car sales, being ‘technology- neutral’ and improving BEV charging.

Despite the outlawing of new petrol and diesel car and van sales in the UK being eight-and-a-half years away, 2030 is writ large within the automotive industry.


It’s also at the forefront of the minds of those who work at the Department for Transport – not least Rachel Maclean, the Conservative MP for Redditch who is the minister responsible for transport decarbonisation.

1626708483973.png

photo: Rachel Maclean, the Conservative MP for Redditch who is the minister responsible for transport decarbonisation.

It seems as though the tide is turning and British drivers are slowly backing out of petrol and diesel vehicles in favour of zero-emissions ones. Statistics published by the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders (SMMT) show that electric cars took 10.7% of all new registrations in June. But there’s still a long way to go.
Although the focus so far has been on battery electric vehicles (BEVs), Maclean said the government is open to other technologies, such as hydrogen, playing their parts in decarbonising our vehicle parc.

“The approach we take is that we don’t prescribe one technology over another,” Maclean told Autocar in an exclusive interview. “We’re completely technology- neutral. But it’s a fact that some technologies have been accelerated beyond others. While we’re technology- neutral, we’re not outcome- neutral: the outcome has to be decarbonising the economy and hitting net-zero.

“The truth about hydrogen is that it’s very expensive to produce. The government has supported hydrogen, and it does have a role to play. We’re going to be releasing a hydrogen strategy very soon. Our ambition is to aim for 5GW of [annual] hydrogen production [in the UK]. We see it being used in the end to decarbonise areas such as HGVs, aeroplanes and ships.”

Synthetic fuels – recently touted by Porsche and other sports car manufacturers as a potential future solution – also “have a role to play” in driving down emissions, said Maclean, although she added that they will probably be used more in the aviation and maritime industries, “because those sectors are hard to decarbonise”.

One area that will be affected as the automotive industry evolves into an electrically powered one is classic cars. In May, the Historic and Classic Vehicles Alliance hit out at the government for unfairly penalising classic cars as part of its drive to decarbonise, despite the average classic car driving just 1200 miles per year. However, Maclean made a commitment to not unduly impact the sector.

“Obviously, the classic car community is a really important group and a really important part of the whole picture, and I’m sure many of your readers will fall into that category,” she told Autocar. “It’s important to be clear that while we’re phasing out the sale of new petrol and diesel vehicles, at this stage we don’t have any plans to actually ask people to remove existing or classic cars or older cars from the road.

“The existing policy is that obviously we won’t be allowing any new [petrol or diesel] vehicles to be sold [beyond 2030], but those existing vehicles can continue. It’s quite important, so hopefully I can say this and reassure people.

“Even when we think about things like E10 petrol, we want to be very clear that we do consider the needs of classic cars and their drivers, because it’s a big part of their lives.”

While the 2030 phase-out date is a clear marker for the industry, there’s little to stop manufacturers (at least in theory) flooding the market with ICE vehicles as a final hurrah. This is a possibility that Maclean is concerned about. “We do need to look at the constraints we can put on the industry in terms of what car manufactures can and can’t sell, and we need to have a solution to stop them from doing that in some way, shape or form,” she said.

One idea could be a system whereby manufacturers are obliged to ensure that a certain percentage of their sales each year are electric – effectively limiting the number of petrol and diesel cars that can be sold.
However, Maclean said that “we’re not there yet on the specifics and the numbers, as we need to allow the industry to respond.” She continued: “Any regulation we make is going to have an impact on manufacturers, because they will seek to maximise their returns.

“And now that the UK has left the EU, we need to make our own regulations around CO2 emissions. What we need to do – and we will do this shortly – is to publish our green paper talking about what the regulatory regime will look like, and there we will talk about how we tackle this problem.”

Given the focus on CO2, some argue that the changes the government made to its Plug-in Car Grant in March, cutting it from £3000 to £2500 and lowering the price cap for eligible EVs from £50,000 to £35,000, were backward steps.

Defending the move, Maclean said “it’s right” for the government to look at “where it’s making the most impact”, and that the EV grant is now targeted toward “lower-priced vehicles” because “that’s where people are less likely to be able to fund the cost out of their own pocket entirely.”

Maclean also hinted the EV grant could disappear entirely over time: “I think it’s right to keep on looking at that [the future of the scheme], because ultimately we need to make sure we’re not using government money to help people buy cars who could have afforded them anyway.

 

Legs

ADC
Book Reviewer
While the 2030 phase-out date is a clear marker for the industry, there’s little to stop manufacturers (at least in theory) flooding the market with ICE vehicles as a final hurrah. This is a possibility that Maclean is concerned about. “We do need to look at the constraints we can put on the industry in terms of what car manufactures can and can’t sell, and we need to have a solution to stop them from doing that in some way, shape or form,” she said.

One idea could be a system whereby manufacturers are obliged to ensure that a certain percentage of their sales each year are electric – effectively limiting the number of petrol and diesel cars that can be sold.
However, Maclean said that “we’re not there yet on the specifics and the numbers, as we need to allow the industry to respond.” She continued: “Any regulation we make is going to have an impact on manufacturers, because they will seek to maximise their returns.

What this seems to be saying is that despite 2030 being the cut-off for selling ICE vehicles, the government is to restrict the sale before that date. Which seems to be contradictory to the rules of fair trade. Telling manufacturers that in (for example) 2025 you must sell 10% electric vehicles, and in 2026 it must be 20% etc, then this means that for those people that cannot find an electric (or Hydrogen etc) vehicle that suits their needs (and there are many who need a vehicle that isn't yet available as an electric vehicle are going to have to buy an older, less clean ICE vehicle just because the manufacturer hasn't reached that percentage target.

If Ford, for example, don't sell the 10%, will they be told to close down the dealerships? What if they sell 1 million vehicles in the first 2 months of a given year, and only 100 of them are electric, will they be told "you can't sell any more ICE vehicles until you meet the 10% electric target"? What if in the first 10 months they meet the 10% target, but in the last 2 months they only manage to sell ICEs? Will they be penalised because the customer is buying what they want or need?
 
@Legs , the attention of the manufacturers, continues to be concentrated as it has for the last 5-8 years(?!), by the imposition of financial penalties on those manufacturers, who fail to retail a stated proportion of electric v. ICE powered vehicles.

Don't ask me who fixes the financial penalties. Who they are paid to, who benefits . . . I imagine individual Governments. Don't ask me whether the level of the penalties are common on a universal/worldwide, I don't know.

I do know that (as with the "Carbon Trading", concerning emissions), there is now an established "market" between manufacturers selling/trading "credits". As you can imagine Tesla, is doing rather well selling its credits, to other manufacturers predominantly STILL manufacturing/selling ICE vehicles.

Whilst Ford and other manufacturers do (still) own outright, their own dealerships (particularly where they cannot attract other private/commercial investors/dealers), it would be VERY surprising if there were an attempt by any Government/regulatory authority, to equate a manufacturers presence on the "High Street" with the manufacturer's success in transitioning from ICE to electric power.
 

964ST

War Hero
I was surprised to find a Yamaha RD 500lc in a garage that I was invited to rummage through, I have only ever driven (taken for a bucking bronco!) an RD350lc. Unfortunately the 500 not for sale :(
Electric with two stroke I bet they have not considered that Hybrid.
 

Tyk

LE
What this seems to be saying is that despite 2030 being the cut-off for selling ICE vehicles, the government is to restrict the sale before that date. Which seems to be contradictory to the rules of fair trade. Telling manufacturers that in (for example) 2025 you must sell 10% electric vehicles, and in 2026 it must be 20% etc, then this means that for those people that cannot find an electric (or Hydrogen etc) vehicle that suits their needs (and there are many who need a vehicle that isn't yet available as an electric vehicle are going to have to buy an older, less clean ICE vehicle just because the manufacturer hasn't reached that percentage target.

If Ford, for example, don't sell the 10%, will they be told to close down the dealerships? What if they sell 1 million vehicles in the first 2 months of a given year, and only 100 of them are electric, will they be told "you can't sell any more ICE vehicles until you meet the 10% electric target"? What if in the first 10 months they meet the 10% target, but in the last 2 months they only manage to sell ICEs? Will they be penalised because the customer is buying what they want or need?

Rather than a quota or directly limited sales approach I think it's likely they will apply some punitive and increasing sales tariff on new hydrocarbon burners.
Not only is it easy to do from a governmental perspective, it's a policy that sells to the obsessively green and is hard to oppose in this world where CO2 is treated as a pollutant not essential plant food.
I do admit I'm greatly amused by the whole de-carbonisation agenda, the CO2 is bad industry has captured so many gullible and dangerous idiots and made an unbelievable fortune as a result.
Climate change is real, the climate has always and will always change it's almost never been as cold on the planet as it is now, polar icecaps are an anomaly, not the norm. Plants use water really inefficiently with so little CO2 in the atmosphere as they grow far more stomata to deal with the near starvation level of CO2.
 
This will be a problem I think there should be government intervention in eventually. Currently, from what I've read, you not only need those separate apps and cards, but crucially, you often need to be a registered member with the provider and pay an annual membership fee. A lot of the online mapping products that show you where chargers are also have paid membership for access schemes.

We can all see how that would end up working in rip off Britain. A cartel of private businesses shutting up shop and making people cough up a year on year increasing annual 'service fee' to be allowed to use that specific brand of charger, in the same dystopian way you'd have to register with BP or Texaco now for the pump to operate.

Unless you upgrade your house to a 3 phase supply at the cost of a few grand the best you're going to be able to do at home is 7KW AC overnight charging which is slow. They'll have the consumers pants down with access fees for those hundreds of kilowatt DC rapid chargers on top of the cost of the charge itself unless there's fair use legislation to stop the inevitable profiteering.
Why would you need a 3 phase house supply. Pretty sure mine isn’t.
 
Rather than a quota or directly limited sales approach I think it's likely they will apply some punitive and increasing sales tariff on new hydrocarbon burners.
Not only is it easy to do from a governmental perspective, it's a policy that sells to the obsessively green and is hard to oppose in this world where CO2 is treated as a pollutant not essential plant food.
I do admit I'm greatly amused by the whole de-carbonisation agenda, the CO2 is bad industry has captured so many gullible and dangerous idiots and made an unbelievable fortune as a result.
Climate change is real, the climate has always and will always change it's almost never been as cold on the planet as it is now, polar icecaps are an anomaly, not the norm. Plants use water really inefficiently with so little CO2 in the atmosphere as they grow far more stomata to deal with the near starvation level of CO2.
In effect the system has been in place for years; manufacturers pay a levy to the EU based on their carbon output of their range. It’s what brought us the Aston Martin Cygnet, a Toyota Aygo with a bit of wood inside. And it’s why Suzuki stopped selling the new Jimny in Europe and brought it back a year later as a commercial vehicle.
 
Not an integral model from within the MG range in China, merely a cynically re-badged vehicle from elsewhere within the SAIC conglomerate. If they could resolve that front grill, it might be more successful.

+ + + + + + + + + + + +

Published by: Jack Warrick, AUTOCAR magazine, on 20 July 2021.

MG 5 SW EV gains bigger battery for 250-mile range.

New variant, priced from £26,495, is said to offer the highest range per pound of any EV on sale in the UK.


The MG 5 SW EV has gained a new variant with a larger 61.1kWh battery, which the Chinese firm says gives it a 250-mile range.

Prices for the new range-topping electric estate start at £26,495 for Excite trim, while the Exclusive starts from £28,995 (post-grant).

The new 5 will be sold alongside the existing entry-level model, which is advertised with a 214-mile official range.

MG says the EV can be charged up to 80% in just 61 minutes from a 50kW rapid-charger or in 40 minutes from a 100kW rapid-charger.

A full charge can be completed in approximately 9.5 hours from a standard home charger.

“With the new longer-range model, we’re offering MG customers even greater value and flexibility from their EVs,” said MG marketing director David Pugh.

“With a full charge giving a WLTP-approved range of 250 miles and the ability to be rapid-charged to 80% in as little as 40 minutes, the MG 5 EV is a car that really can bring electric motoring to the masses, and it has played a big part in MG’s rapid charge ahead as one of the leaders in the UK EV market.”

MG also claims the 5 now offers the highest range-per-pound of any EV in the UK. It's aiming the model at the fleet market, with small and medium-sized businesses in mind.

The upgrade also brings MG's pilot advanced driver assistance feature, which includes a selection of warning and alert features, including automatic emergency braking, lane-keeping assistance and adaptive cruise control.

The new 5 also gets MG's seven-year warranty.

1626781924534.png


 
Published by: Jack Warrick, AUTOCAR magazine, on 20 July 2021.

GKN Automotive developing modular 800V electric drivetrains.

UK firm says new technologies provide faster charging times, increased driving range and higher performance.

British engineering firm GKN Automotive will ramp up development of its next-generation electric powertrain hardware, because of the increasing demand for EVs.

The automotive components supplier will accelerate production of new 'eDrive' technologies using 800V electrics, which the firm says allows for faster charging times, increased driving range and higher levels of performance.

The company’s eDrive system has been in use for more than 20 years and already powers more than 1.5 million vehicles worldwide, with systems found in both electric and hybrid vehicles.

“Global demand for EVs is accelerating fast, and now is the perfect time for GKN Automotive to underpin its leadership in eDrive systems through next-generation technologies,” said GKN Automotive CEO Liam Butterworth.

“These high-tech 800V systems will create faster charging cars with better battery range, improved driving performance and even greater efficiencies.

"GKN Automotive intends to continue delivering an increasingly electrified future."

GKN Automotive says future 800V systems are in an advanced stage of development and are currently being tested in real-world conditions. It believes improved efficiencies “could lead to car makers opting to use smaller batteries to reduce vehicle cost, complexity and weight”.

Development is being supported by the firm's partnership with the Jaguar Racing team in Formula E, where testing helps to improve several system capabilities.

“Constant testing to improve efficiency, performance and extending the range of batteries in the ultra-competitive world of electric motorsport creates a direct link from race to road,” the firm said.

“Cutting-edge developments currently being developed for Jaguar Racing will likely be available on near-future road cars in just three years.”

The move forward comes after GKN Automotive announced the decision to close its Birmingham factory back in January, resulting in the loss of 519 jobs.

The company operates in 20 countries, employing a total of around 27,500 people worldwide.

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Posted on this "what-would-make-you-buy-an-electric-car" thread, and also on the "Manufacturing in the UK" thread.
 
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