What will be different following the Coronavirus?

Postcodes in rural areas might cover a couple of square miles and may not direct you to the desired location without a road name.
When I input a postcode into the system, all KNOWN premises are then shown and I select which one. Newbuilds are the issue in that regards. If its a new build, I will select nearest known other location and add supplementary info.
In most cases the distict officers know where they are going anyway and rarely need to be "despatched by dr
ag & drop"- sent to satnav. Initial location is primariliy so we know which channel to use and which district to send the log to.
 
One thing that will change is that I will probably knock it on the head even earlier than planned. I am handling this almost lockdown quite well and getting loads done that would have otherwise waited for weeks, especially around the garden. On the current plan I am in work for about one day for two weeks out of every four. In theory we are working from home, but because so many activities have been cancelled, there is no real work to do. It's all tickover stuff. At the moment I am working on developing a document (Probably turn into a website) that will point our 1700 or so staff to online training resources that they can utilise as part of their working from home routine. Some open source, some restricted/account only access. I even have tacit agreement, from our big boss, that he will make a reasonable amount of money available for any exams etc. bearing in mind that we are currently not spending any of our travel money or the training budget.

You would be amazed what free, or almost free, resources are available for everything from knitting to advanced physics and maths.

I have no appetite to go back to regular work as things stand.
 
I remember a good friend of mine who told the story about how she rang 999 to report her neighbour's house on fire, she gave the address and then the operator began asking for more details, about how to get there, were there any particular details about the route that the driver would need to know.

My friend, in a bit of a tizzy, got into an argument with the operator, "How can you not know where Montgomery Road is? What are ye doing asking stupid questions like that? Is this your first day? It's literally down the street from you, your fellas must pass it two or three times every day? Big Mickey McCrystal who worked in your station up to last year, remember him? He lived in Montgomery Road, well he moved a few months ago. How the hell do you not know where Montgomery Road is? Is there no one else there? I know! Ask Bill Fleming, his aunty lives in the street next to Montgomery Road, he'll know, is he on tonight? Oh, never mind I can hear them coming now. Silly girl, imagine not knowing where Montgomery Road is!"

She admitted feeling a little foolish when Bill Fleming, who was on the call, assured her that as soon as she gave the address the emergency was called and the crew was on the way, the operator who was in a call centre 70 miles away was simply, and patiently, trying to ascertain if there were any other important and useful details.

My friend, God bless her, had always assumed that if you phoned 999 you were put through to a phone operator in the actual fire station.
Cut backs to staffing,means that if busy calls from North Yorks go to Cornwall and vice versa they can access the same turn out computer system.
 
Cut backs to staffing,means that if busy calls from North Yorks go to Cornwall and vice versa they can access the same turn out computer system.
I will add this...if for example you are in Wales and your mate in Edinburgh has just announced via text message he is about to top himself...phone 999 and state from the beginning "disregard the incoming number- I require Police Scotland"...or whatever force/service you require.
When you phone 999 they will just connect you to nearest force/service you are geolocated to otherwise.
 
I started to feel that way the first weekend after I started regular work.
I especially enjoy getting stuff done properly, that I would otherwise have done quickly and under time pressure. Also I am a big fan of a few beers midweek, which is now a regular (If temporary) thing, although not the day before a run. This turns out to be a good control measure.

From the end of April I was supposed to be away for 5 weeks. That has now been cancelled, as has regular work, so I'm lapping it up.
 
what3words app I urge everyone to get it. We can also send it direct to your phone when you call. Our systems can use it to locate. If you phone 999 from a landline we know whereyou are anyway. If from a mobile, provided your phone is not "roaming" we can pretty much pinpoint you in most cases. Takes around 15 mins to do a reverse subscriber check also (which is pointless if the mobile is a prepaid burner phone)
Why would I want to download a proprietary app when I could just use the existing open location codes that are already on my phones map?

 

engr172

War Hero
Book Reviewer
One thing that will change is that I will probably knock it on the head even earlier than planned. I am handling this almost lockdown quite well and getting loads done that would have otherwise waited for weeks, especially around the garden. On the current plan I am in work for about one day for two weeks out of every four. In theory we are working from home, but because so many activities have been cancelled, there is no real work to do. It's all tickover stuff. At the moment I am working on developing a document (Probably turn into a website) that will point our 1700 or so staff to online training resources that they can utilise as part of their working from home routine. Some open source, some restricted/account only access. I even have tacit agreement, from our big boss, that he will make a reasonable amount of money available for any exams etc. bearing in mind that we are currently not spending any of our travel money or the training budget.

You would be amazed what free, or almost free, resources are available for everything from knitting to advanced physics and maths.

I have no appetite to go back to regular work as things stand.
Udemy is good, if you haven’t come across it.
 
One thing that will change is that I will probably knock it on the head even earlier than planned. I am handling this almost lockdown quite well and getting loads done that would have otherwise waited for weeks, especially around the garden. On the current plan I am in work for about one day for two weeks out of every four. In theory we are working from home, but because so many activities have been cancelled, there is no real work to do. It's all tickover stuff. At the moment I am working on developing a document (Probably turn into a website) that will point our 1700 or so staff to online training resources that they can utilise as part of their working from home routine. Some open source, some restricted/account only access. I even have tacit agreement, from our big boss, that he will make a reasonable amount of money available for any exams etc. bearing in mind that we are currently not spending any of our travel money or the training budget.

You would be amazed what free, or almost free, resources are available for everything from knitting to advanced physics and maths.

I have no appetite to go back to regular work as things stand.
I, and my team, normally work from home, so the confinement really isn’t that big of a deal anyway. What is different though, is as you say, the amount of work to do has declined. We can’t go visit customers to do site surveys for new installations, even if we could, we can’t deploy anything, so it’s all paperwork and catching up on training. Half a day’s work at most per day, so I’m catching up with “honey do” jobs. I must have burned 50 tons of tree stumps and brush. Dug the garage out, emptied a few residual moving boxes, almost finished siding the shed, built a gate on the deck, building a fence for the dogs. Very therapeutic!
 
I, and my team, normally work from home, so the confinement really isn’t that big of a deal anyway. What is different though, is as you say, the amount of work to do has declined. We can’t go visit customers to do site surveys for new installations, even if we could, we can’t deploy anything, so it’s all paperwork and catching up on training. Half a day’s work at most per day, so I’m catching up with “honey do” jobs. I must have burned 50 tons of tree stumps and brush. Dug the garage out, emptied a few residual moving boxes, almost finished siding the shed, built a gate on the deck, building a fence for the dogs. Very therapeutic!
Get working on that clockface on the shed gable end!

Have you "relaxed beard" whilst working from home?
 
what3words app I urge everyone to get it. We can also send it direct to your phone when you call. Our systems can use it to locate. If you phone 999 from a landline we know whereyou are anyway. If from a mobile, provided your phone is not "roaming" we can pretty much pinpoint you in most cases. Takes around 15 mins to do a reverse subscriber check also (which is pointless if the mobile is a prepaid burner phone)
Get the W3W app. In rural areas it can be invaluable, if you've had an accident in the middle of nowhere, at work, you won"t know the grid reference for that location. The fact that YOU know you are "50 yards from Bob Smiths big wheat field, near where the tree blew down last year" is no help to Supermatelot. A method of locating you to 3msq is. Another bonus is for members of Rural Crime Team / whatsapp groups to be able to see exactly where the pikeys are currently, and act accordingly.
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
Saw this elsewhere. Not my forecasts but may be of interest:

In no particular order:

  1. Grandparents will be treasured more.
  2. Divorce rate will rocket
  3. Nine months on we will see a baby boom
  4. People will keep larger stocks of essentials
  5. Larger reserve capacity for ICU beds and ventilators
  6. More funding for the NHS
  7. Far tighter pandemic rules.
  8. Greater uptake of flu vaccines and vaccines in general
  9. Less strain on NHS as many health compromised patients will have died.
  10. Tax increases, maybe even ring-fenced for the NHS
  11. Fewer foreign holidays, especially cruises
  12. Endless crappy books, films and documentaries about the virus and its effects.


The obvious one for me is that the non-digital generation will be much more blasé about video calls from a handheld device via eg WhatsApp etc.

Longer term, I think my son's career path won't be the same as that of his recent predecessors.
International flight will become unusual. Easyjet will fold.

Personally , I think Europe will quietly abandon Schengen and start reconstituting border controls alle uber der platz, giving a suitable rude gesture in the direction of Bruxelles. That need not concern us.
 
  1. Endless crappy books, films and documentaries about the virus and its effects.
Agree with your whole list, but this one stood out. I also think there will be endless crappy books and films created by people who never had the time before. "That book I always wanted to write, but never had the time" will become "That book I now found time to write". Publishers will become inundated with piles and piles of them.

"Bob woke with a start, as the morning sun streamed through the thin curtains hanging at the bay window of his modest semi in suburbia. His nose was instantly assaulted by the reek of cheap whisky and supermarket cigars, which was emanating from the clothes he had fallen asleep wearing the night before........"
 

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