What was "W/T Navigation" ?

_Chimurenga_

LE
Gallery Guru
#1
I am currently reading a biography of the aviatrix Amy Johnson and in it the author mentions the subjects that needed to be mastered in order to obtain a Pilot's "B License" (circa 1929), one of which is W/T Navigation. A quick google & wiki search leads me only to endless mobile phone entries.

Any help ?
 
#3
I would think it has something to do with using your wireless set to home in on radio beacons which were in their infancy in those days.
 
#5
Well, now, W/T means 'wireless telegraphy' - or radio as we might call it now, So W/T navigation would be what we might now call navigation using radio aids. By 1929, I think we had the radio compass, which would allow homing to a transmitter and various versions of the radio range, which was an early directional transmitter - It put out four fairly wide beams that could be used for homing with rather more precision - the forerunner of ILS, I suppose, not to mention VOR and TACAN. There was also HF DF by then, I think, so the navigator could make a transmission and receive information about his or her bearing from a HF DF station. Consol was a rather later idea, I think.

Google the terms in italic and tell me if I'm in the right ball park.

Edited to add: Wikipedia has a very informative introduction under sonne, it turns out.
 
S

syledis

Guest
#8
It was still used in the 90,s with brave men working on their own in Jungles and deserts setting up radionavigation beacons in far flung godless locations, on their own for months at a time.

It was called Syledis !!
 
#11
#12
I'll see your Oboe, and raise you Lorenz, I think it was first used in the Coventry raid, but was developed from a pre-war Lufthansa nav-aid;

Wikipedia is your friend;

Lorenz beam - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Professor R V Jones wrote about it in 'Most secret war' I think they managed to 'bend' the radio beam, thus giving a false location.
... and this may provide the answer as Lorenz was developed as a blind approach navigation system ... perhaps other such sytems had been developed and this person was qualified to carry out a blind landing , e.g. in fog , with aid of such kit .
 

_Chimurenga_

LE
Gallery Guru
#15
Without seeing context of the original quote, could it mean W/T and Navigation - as two separate subjects?
Nope, I quote from the book ("Amy Johnson" by Constance Babington Smith. Collins; London, 1967, p. 166) -

"Henceforward all holders of the pilot's 'B' Licence would have to satisfy new requirements as navigators. This meant mastering the following subjects: Form of the Earth, Maps and Charts, Meteorology, Dead Reckoning, Direction-finding, W/T Navigation, The Earth's Magnetism and Compasses, Visual Signalling, International Legislation."




Oh, and my gratitude to everyone who has responded.
 
#16
If all else fails, use Wiki:

Radio direction-finding is the oldest form of radio navigation. Before 1960 navigators used movable loop antennas to locate commercial AM stations near cities. In some cases they used marine radiolocation beacons, which share a range of frequencies just above AM radio with amateur radio operators. LORAN systems also used time-of-flight radio signals, but from radio stations on the ground.
Radio - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Presumably that is what the circular antennae are for:

 
#17
If all else fails, use Wiki:


Radio - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Presumably that is what the circular antennae are for:

The T-33's weren't equiped with circular antenna, but I can well recall using a combination of AM radio stations, and IFR (I follow roads) while navigating my way across Canada (Bootleg stick time of course, as we lowly groundcrew were not officially permitted to take control of the aircraft).
 
#19
Nope, I quote from the book ("Amy Johnson" by Constance Babington Smith. Collins; London, 1967, p. 166) -

"Henceforward all holders of the pilot's 'B' Licence would have to satisfy new requirements as navigators. This meant mastering the following subjects: Form of the Earth, Maps and Charts, Meteorology, Dead Reckoning, Direction-finding, W/T Navigation, The Earth's Magnetism and Compasses, Visual Signalling, International Legislation."




Oh, and my gratitude to everyone who has responded.
Thanks for that, all seems quite advanced for 1929.
 

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