What to do with foxes youve shot ?

ugly

LE
Moderator
#3
Nothing goes to waste, the tails get stripped and cured then sold to the terrier men, the rest I put in the middle of the main road and giggle as townies swerve to avoid them.
 
#4
Nothing goes to waste, the tails get stripped and cured then sold to the terrier men, the rest I put in the middle of the main road and giggle as townies swerve to avoid them.
It's a bloody pity the arse fell out of the fur market. A good pelt would get some real pocket money.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#6
It's a bloody pity the arse fell out of the fur market. A good pelt would get some real pocket money.
There is still money but its not easy and rather specialist and not a lot of money for the effort esp when you have to clean the pelts up a lot!
 

Joker62

ADC
Book Reviewer
#7
We got given a fox cub by a gamekeeper when on patrol comp training in Sennybridge, skinned and splayed over an open fire, cooked fairly quickly but tastes like shit. The person who got the cub was a Kiwi and thought he was as warry as ****, so kept the pelt and decided to decorate his Mk6 with it, 2 hours later, was eaten alive by fleas. Mind, it did look good, head at the front, legs dangling, via the elastic, on four corners and the brush hanging down behind :)
 
#8
Tails go to uggs rest feeds the wild life under the bushes.
 
#10
•Take one fox. Skin it and gut it.•Hang the fox in running water for three days.•Cook with garlic, onion and tomato, as if you were cooking rabbit the Italian way: lay in a dish, cover, and stew for about an hour and a half.•I would probably cut the fox into halves, not quarters.•Serve with chestnut pasta, and for wine: a good Falerian.It's not generally known that the Thais eat a lot of fox. It's the closest thing that Chinese, Thais and Malays can legally get to dog. In fact, Manchester is one of the prime markets for selling shot fox to Thais. There's also fillet of badger - most West Country pubs used to have badger ham on the bar - but that's another story.
 
#11
Next week fillet of badger!! That sounds interesting!!!
 
#14
In all seriousness Id have to be very bloody hungry to eat a fox , they `kin stink and are covered in fleas , badgers aren't a lot better ,I`ve tried squirrel and hedgehog , not to bad , rook = yuk , pigeon breast quiet pleasant , rabbit okay , but then theres the wild stuff I go out of my way to shoot/eat , favorite three being wild duck , venison , wild boar.
 
#16
In all seriousness Id have to be very bloody hungry to eat a fox , they `kin stink and are covered in fleas , badgers aren't a lot better ,I`ve tried squirrel and hedgehog , not to bad , rook = yuk , pigeon breast quiet pleasant , rabbit okay , but then theres the wild stuff I go out of my way to shoot/eat , favorite three being wild duck , venison , wild boar.
Over the years I have eaten quite a few interesting things. I found badger OK if a bit tough. They are a right bugger to skin though and the advice about the glands was learned the hard way. Favourite wild meat has to be whale, it shoves the all but the finest steak into a shoebox. kæstur hákarl (fermented shark) has to be one of the more interesting offerings made much more palatable with a large glass of svarti dauði (black death). Mind you, the shark is probably still less harmful to the human digestive system than a MacDonalds sawdustburger!
 
#18
•Take one fox. Skin it and gut it.•Hang the fox in running water for three days.•Cook with garlic, onion and tomato, as if you were cooking rabbit the Italian way: lay in a dish, cover, and stew for about an hour and a half.•I would probably cut the fox into halves, not quarters.•Serve with chestnut pasta, and for wine: a good Falerian.It's not generally known that the Thais eat a lot of fox. It's the closest thing that Chinese, Thais and Malays can legally get to dog. In fact, Manchester is one of the prime markets for selling shot fox to Thais. There's also fillet of badger - most West Country pubs used to have badger ham on the bar - but that's another story.
My bold, I used to know a chap from the Somerset/Gloucestershire area who went lamping for foxes & claimed that he sold all the foxes he shot to a couple of local Chinese restaurants. He didn't ask/care what they did with them after they had paid!
 
#19
Yes, Jarrod is correct when he says I am an ethnic!!

Many years ago I was given a copy of “Les Cuisines Oubliées” (Forgotten Kitchens), unfortunately it is only available in French but I am willing translate some of the weird and wonderful recipes for those interested. So today I present to you with "Blaireau au sang" (Badger in Blood or Badger Stew)

Ingredients:
1 badger
1 glass of pig’s blood
1 small glass - Armagnac
1 ginger root
1 bottle of dry, sparkling white wine
2 eggs
250 ml crème fraîche
salt and pepper
500g forest mushrooms or chestnuts to accompany
100g butter
oil

Preparation:

Eviscerate and skin your badger, and soak it in a fast-flowing river (if there is no river at hand use a neighbours fishpond, remembering to throw in your industrial sized submersible pump to get the water moving) for at least 48 hours. This will help you to de-grease it more easily. Once the badger is de-greased, cut it into pieces and brown it in a frying pan with butter. When the pieces are golden and stiff, flambé with the Armagnac, season and add a grated soup-spoon of ginger, fresh if possible. Pour over the wine, and simmer gently for at least two hours. At the end of the cooking time, mix the chopped badger liver (cooked beforehand in a little oil), the glass of blood, two egg yolks, a coffee-spoon of ginger and the crème fraîche, and pour into the cooking dish. Serve immediately.

Enjoy

If anyone is interested I have a recipe for Bear’s Feet that can be adjusted slightly and applied to any baby elephant’s feet you happen to have hanging around in the fridge.
 
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