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What things do you see all the time on TV or in Films?

And the fumes would have filled the room in the interim, then go up as soon as the first spark of the zippo appears.
Belfast ‘74. One side decided to burn down a drinking club belonging to the other side.

The plan was to break in and slosh petrol around, then leave a burning candle that would ignite the petrol when it burnt down to the carpet.

However when the match/lighter was set off....

3 x balaclavas VSI
 
Belfast ‘74. One side decided to burn down a drinking club belonging to the other side.

The plan was to break in and slosh petrol around, then leave a burning candle that would ignite the petrol when it burnt down to the carpet.

However when the match/lighter was set off....

3 x balaclavas VSI
Oh no! What a shame!
 
Belfast ‘74. One side decided to burn down a drinking club belonging to the other side.

The plan was to break in and slosh petrol around, then leave a burning candle that would ignite the petrol when it burnt down to the carpet.

However when the match/lighter was set off....

3 x balaclavas VSI
Was the ghost of Darwin and the Emperor seen briefly in the glow?
 
Having fenced (sabre and epee), five minutes is exhausting as you're carrying your weight on the leg muscles and not using the skeleton for support. Hits are best made as quickly as possible before fatigue and errors put you in a losing situation. In a real fight, first hits would be to put the opponent in shock or try to bleed him out before trying for the fatal blow.
Indeed (sabre and foil)... slash, parry, thrust, next victim... most engagements over in a few seconds.
 

Cromarty

Old-Salt
In all the declarations I was involved with, the soldiery lined up, SLRs on cock hook and look, and mags held above the receiver so the breech and mags could be checked simultaneously.

How the Hell did he have one up the spout AND pull the trigger?

After an Admirals funeral in 1989, the guard was marched off to clear that rifle and get on the bus. We hear the orders to unload, inspect weapons, ease spri...BANG! Lots of yelling. Never found out what happened to the culprit.

I never could understand how he didn't fire during the ceremony, how he didn't unload the blank or how he didn't see or feel the round in the chamber.
 
He has Irish and US citizenship, he lives in Australia. I think the only time he ever "told the world" he was Scottish was in a movie, in which he acted as a Scotsman.
I was being ironic
 

Cromarty

Old-Salt
Is that a shotgun on the right...?

Presumably in real life someone sniping from a heli' would have the weapon in some sort of vibration-dampening, stabilising mount and not just be sitting on the door sill with the butt in his shoulder and taking snapshots - a la Hollywood...?

Why the shotgun and what is attached to it?

Don't the heli snipers use a bungee type cord to steady the rifle?
 

Cromarty

Old-Salt
Half the stuff they teach is to help us keep calm when it all goes horribly wrong rather than actually do anything meaningful I reckon. I mean, you're not really going to take on an engine room inferno with a 9l fire extinguisher, right...?

Nah - 'course not. You're going to stay the fuck out of the way whilst the people who've actually done a week-long firefighting course rather than a two hour one, know what they're doing and know the ship like th ebakc of their hand go and close all the vent flaps and hatches and replace all the air in the compartment with CO2!

I called an ambulance for a fella in his late 40's, split his head, lots of blood but conscious and talking. Unfortunately it was ambo shift change and did i think it was serious enough to divert the knocking off crew?

No idea i says and go through the incident again, injury description and give an update on his condition.

Call taker decides to wait until the new shift come online. So we wait. Ambulance shows up eventually and i get a bollicking for not making it more urgent. Turns out i was "too calm" on the phone.

Jeez, can't do bloody anything right!
 

Yokel

LE
Half the stuff they teach is to help us keep calm when it all goes horribly wrong rather than actually do anything meaningful I reckon. I mean, you're not really going to take on an engine room inferno with a 9l fire extinguisher, right...?

Nah - 'course not. You're going to stay the fuck out of the way whilst the people who've actually done a week-long firefighting course rather than a two hour one, know what they're doing and know the ship like th ebakc of their hand go and close all the vent flaps and hatches and replace all the air in the compartment with CO2!

Surely one of the problems these days is that people pick up fire extinguishers and think that they are Red Adair! The average fire extinguisher lasts for what? A minute? Also when foam extinguishers are used on the TV are they used properly? Or do they wave them around and chase the flames?

Do the normal laws of heat transfer apply in films?
 
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Cromarty

Old-Salt
Miniguns can be fired continuously for ages without a mount and from the hip despite having no obvious power source and only whatever link remained in the short length of "caterpillar" that connected the gun to the ammo feed before it was dismounted from whichever AFV/pick-up/heli' it was mounted on. If there is a backpack, such as in Predator, it will hold more ammo than all the armouries in NATO combined and will be almost weightless. The weapon itself is magically recoilless.

Weapons are stored in armouries, the ammunition is stored in magazines.
 

NSP

LE
Surely one of the problems these days is that people pick up fire extinguishers and think that they are Red Adair! The average fire extinguisher lasts for what? A minute? Also when foam extinguishers are used on the TV are they used properly? Or do they wave them around and chase the flames?

Do the normal laws of heat transfer apply in films?
The main problem in my field seems to be that, having carefully colour-coded the things and taught everyone which colour meant what and could be used on which type of fire, the EU waded in and waved its willy and decreed that they should all be red...
 

Yokel

LE
The main problem in my field seems to be that, having carefully colour-coded the things and taught everyone which colour meant what and could be used on which type of fire, the EU waded in and waved its willy and decreed that they should all be red...

I know - was that before or after 2000? Why did they do it? Was there a problem with people seeing black, cream, blue, or green extinguishers and not recognising them?

With a BFO label in the old colour.

The trouble is it would take a moment or two to see it - moments in which a small fire can grow. Plus people will make mistakes as they panic.

What would a human factors assessment say?
 
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The trouble is it would take a moment or two to see it
Do you remember the chrome/stainless ones? Usually in expensive hotels/department stores, etc.
THEY took some looking at to find out what was in them - but in those days they were probably all water/acid types.
 

Cromarty

Old-Salt
Usually in old westerns, but seen in others, fist fight in a bar or wherever between the goodie and the baddie. One or t’other gets knocked down by a punch, and then for some unexplained reason, he gets lifted up by the guy still standing to get punched again.

Why?

If he’s been knocked to the ground, stand over him and kick or punch the shit out of him, like in real life.

Maybe in the old west it was despicable to batter someone on the ground. But I doubt it.

He could have been like one of my gunnery instructors who threatened to throw me out of a second story window, come downstairs to drag me back up just so he could throw me out of the window again. Or to hit me with so many uppercuts I'd be suspended in mid air.
 
Indeed (sabre and foil)... slash, parry, thrust, next victim... most engagements over in a few seconds.

Indeed

Most Japanese sword disciplines such as Iaido start with drawing the blade as the first lethal cut. The blade is drawn at speed and the cut directed at the enemy's throat. A second cut follows, aimed at the head.

The next movement is chiburi - shaking the blood from the blade, followed by re-sheating the blade.

All over in a few seconds...
 

Cromarty

Old-Salt
The first time I noticed it was as a teenager when a bunch of us went to the pictures to see ‘Jaws II’.

‘Cable Junction’ is introduced in such an obvious, clumsy way at the beginning that it’s easy to guess what happens at the end...


The film also taught me to beware sequels.

Mind you, not as much as ‘Jaws III’ taught be to avoid any film with ‘III’ in the title...

Well, you obviously haven't seen Police Academy III.

Taxi!!
 

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