What things do you see all the time on TV or in Films?

Yokel

LE
Why do programmes or films involving British intelligence people or the like seem to make a big thing of people having to sign the Official Secrets Act and using that as a plot device? I am watching a repeat of Foyle's War. There was a scene in which a female recruit was being interviewed for the SOE, but told that she could not be told anything until she signed the OSA.

Surely the whole country would have under the 'need to know' principle?
 
Last edited:
So, pick any century when swords were the main weapon, opposing armies line up in neat rows, then everyone charges towards each other as fast as they can and it all descends into a one on one melee, instead of having some disciplined formation.
Sword fights... 5 mins of hitting each other’s sword...
 
Sword fights... 5 mins of hitting each other’s sword...
Having fenced (sabre and epee), five minutes is exhausting as you're carrying your weight on the leg muscles and not using the skeleton for support. Hits are best made as quickly as possible before fatigue and errors put you in a losing situation. In a real fight, first hits would be to put the opponent in shock or try to bleed him out before trying for the fatal blow.
 
Why do programmes or films involving British intelligence people or the like seem to make a big thing of people having to sign the Official Secrets Act and using that as a plot device? I am watching a repeat of Foyle's War. There was a scene in which a female recruit was being interviewed for the SOE, but told that she could not be told anything until she signed the OSA.

Surely the whole country would have under the 'need to know' principle?
It always makes me wonder why they make such a deal about signing it because it is an act of parliament and therefore law and you are presumed at law to know about it and its requirements. Ignorance is no defence at law.
 

NSP

LE
It always makes me wonder why they make such a deal about signing it because it is an act of parliament and therefore law and you are presumed at law to know about it and its requirements. Ignorance is no defence at law.
This came up on another thread recently and it was pointed out by learned ArRSers that you are not "signing the OSA" but signing a document in which you, by appending your signature, declare that you have been made aware that the position you are taking/topic you are being briefed into is security-sensitive and that you have been made aware that you are thus bound by the OSA, what that entails and that you agree to be so bound.

I had to sign such a document when I briefly took employment with an engineering firm that fulfilled defence sector sub-contracts. No biggie.

Anyway, who wants to know what we were doing, then...?

whistling.gif
 

Cromarty

War Hero
Hollywood Jewish film actors, and there are many of them obviously, will always at some point early in the film have a reason to mention that they are in fact Jewish.

Why? No one else finds a need to mention they are English, Scottish Irish, Welsh, Protestant, Catholic, or Church of Arrsemanistan do they?

Apart from everyone who feels the need to mention they are Italian or Irish. At least the Jews might actually be Jewish unlike the others who have never set foot in Italy or Ireland.
 
Apart from everyone who feels the need to mention they are Italian or Irish. At least the Jews might actually be Jewish unlike the others who have never set foot in Italy or Ireland.
I'm pretty sure that Mel Gibson told the whole fucking world that he's Scottish,

The lying Aussie winger.
 

Cromarty

War Hero
People coming around after a period of unconsciousness doing so rapidly - going from comatose to fully alert in an instant.

This can happen. A colleague of mine was called to check on a person of interest (POI) at a train station. When he approached the POI he was knocked unconscious. About 30 seconds later he was up and after the offender, took him down and cuffed. All caught on CCTV.
 

Cromarty

War Hero
What gets me in (mostly American) cop shows is they never wear gloves when searching someone, especially a druggie POS. And it's not just actors, it happens in actual real police shows, Cops, 48 hours, etc.
 

Yokel

LE
This can happen. A colleague of mine was called to check on a person of interest (POI) at a train station. When he approached the POI he was knocked unconscious. About 30 seconds later he was up and after the offender, took him down and cuffed. All caught on CCTV.

Loss of consciousness for less than a minute is not considered a severe injury - merely mild, although devastating complications can follow so keep an eye on them. I am talking about patients supposedly waking straight up and talking, with no confusion; after days or weeks of coma.
 

Cromarty

War Hero
Loss of consciousness for less than a minute is not considered a severe injury - merely mild, although devastating complications can follow so keep an eye on them. I am talking about patients supposedly waking straight up and talking, with no confusion; after days or weeks of coma.

Fair enough, he actually didn't remember any of it. It was years ago but he was fine apart from the short term memory loss.
 

Chef

LE
I can't remember if it's been said already but when people get close to really hot things, molten steel, lava and the like and aren't scorched by it.

In Terminator when Arnie sinks slowly into the molten metal but the clothes he's wearing fail to burst into flames and Temple of doom where people are inches away from molten rock and don't even break a sweat.
 
Last edited:

theoriginalphantom

MIA
Book Reviewer
Why do programmes or films involving British intelligence people or the like seem to make a big thing of people having to sign the Official Secrets Act and using that as a plot device? I am watching a repeat of Foyle's War. There was a scene in which a female recruit was being interviewed for the SOE, but told that she could not be told anything until she signed the OSA.

Surely the whole country would have under the 'need to know' principle?


again with the signing the OSA,

blah blah, nobody signs it but they may have to sign to indicate awareness of it, rant, grrr etc
 

Joker62

ADC
Book Reviewer
Picture the scene, hospital waiting room full of family awaiting the news of a relative who's under the knife at that moment, surgeon appears through door after completing said surgery, gives the good news that he's been repaired and will make a full recovery, family ask to see him, surgeon says "yes fine, he's through there, he might be a bit groggy though". Family arrive in room to see patient fully concious, conversant and probably eating a strawberry Jello (other deserts are available). Now, don't get me wrong, but either they aren't giving the guy enough anaesthetic and he's come round straight from being in theatre or the surgeon has taken his own sweet time to tell the family that he's ok, maybe stopping off to shag the fit nurse or have a 3 course lunch, because the last time I had an op, I was still under around 2 hours after completion.
 

Latest Threads

Top