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What things do you see all the time on TV or in Films?

RedDinger

Old-Salt
In American cop shows in particular:

There’s a briefing (often in front of some incredibly high tech PowerPoint screen) and one Detective/FBI agent starts the briefing.

There’s never any fumbling or ‘where’s the full screen button’. They never go backwards in the presentation by mistake. There’s never a duff graphic.

Then, at some random point, mid-paragraph, the first presenter will have over to the next one: well not really a handover- the first one takes a breath and then the second presenter takes over without a second’s pause.
In Criminal Minds, its usually about 6 of them in a row, doing what you describe.
 

syrup

LE
Just goes to prove how many they wreck and how many takes it took to get the scene right.


Slight off thread

When Soldier Soldier filmed in Cyprus we got on as extras
We were in a nightclub as they filmed a night out
It didn't take long to figure out that when drinking points of real larger every time they stopped filming the props man would top the pint up for "continuity"
 
Star Trek something or other on Film 4 this evening.

USS Enterprise is being attacked and carrying out escape manoeuvres and is being thrown around with crew members inside sliding around on the floor from side to side.

Errr, if there’s artificial gravity inside this ship, why would that happen. Where’s Brian Cox when you need him?

At home Dear Boy

1611154790816.png


Oh, the other creepy sex-offender-type one who did some singing once
 
Or folk hanging on to the chap wearing the parachute, not being jettisoned to their doom by the opening shock . . .
On 26 November 1943 the crew of Aristocrap on their second combat mission with the 351st Bombardment Group out of Polebrook abandoned their blazing plane near Bremen. The parachutes of the pilot and co-pilot had been burned.
The co-pilot 2/Lt Leon Anderson, was clutching the harness of the top turret gunner, S/Sgt Clinton Logan, and it was their hope that both could descend under the one canopy.

However, the shock of the parachute opening caused Anderson to lose his grip and fall away.

Six of the ten-man crew survived the war as PoWs - the dead were the pilot and co-pilot who fell without parachutes, the Radio man who was killed by fragments in the aircraft, during the flak hit, plus one man who later went wire happy whilst in a PoW camp and was lawfully shot whilst climbing the wire.
 
This might just be me, but I’ve always thought that of our Yankee cousins.
They never seem to say ‘please’ but always say ‘thank you’.

Used to grip my shite on holiday in Jamaica

"Yes Sir what can I get you?"
"A beer!"


I once said out loud 'Please and thank you would be nice!"
The offending yank just looked at me like an idiot.

Canadians are much more polite
 
Perhaps not lawfully but there was a “warning wire” that all POW’s were all were aware of that if you even touched it then you would be shot.
As far as I am aware that "warning wire" idea goes back as far as the American Civil War. The Confederates had such a system at their PoW stockade at Andersonville.

1611163797508.png


This image shows the "Deadline" fence at Andersonville in 1864. The main stockade wall is just out of image on the right.


Edit: What does FoC mean ?
 
On 26 November 1943 the crew of Aristocrap on their second combat mission with the 351st Bombardment Group out of Polebrook abandoned their blazing plane near Bremen. The parachutes of the pilot and co-pilot had been burned.
The co-pilot 2/Lt Leon Anderson, was clutching the harness of the top turret gunner, S/Sgt Clinton Logan, and it was their hope that both could descend under the one canopy.

However, the shock of the parachute opening caused Anderson to lose his grip and fall away.

Six of the ten-man crew survived the war as PoWs - the dead were the pilot and co-pilot who fell without parachutes, the Radio man who was killed by fragments in the aircraft, during the flak hit, plus one man who later went wire happy whilst in a PoW camp and was lawfully shot whilst climbing the wire.
This also happened to an RAF Sergeant,as the crew bailed out of a stricken Lancaster. The second last man out was hit by the last man out as they cleared the aircraft, who gripped his legs. He was one of the gunners,who did not wear their chute in the tight confines of the turret, so he had no chute. Second last man opens the chute and the shock causes the gunner to let go and he falls to his death. The other guy survived captivity and made it home.
 
if you watch films particurely with the F14 in they have a number on the nose.
So F14 number 114 is seen lining up on the catapult and takes off
Then they zoom into the cockpit to see our hero but on the zoom in we see the aircraft number is now 203
As they zoom back out to see the formation the aircraft number is now 404 and so on until number 503 lands and our man climbs out

Isnt that a stock-exchange screen on the nose?
 
On 26 November 1943 the crew of Aristocrap on their second combat mission with the 351st Bombardment Group out of Polebrook abandoned their blazing plane near Bremen. The parachutes of the pilot and co-pilot had been burned.
The co-pilot 2/Lt Leon Anderson, was clutching the harness of the top turret gunner, S/Sgt Clinton Logan, and it was their hope that both could descend under the one canopy.

However, the shock of the parachute opening caused Anderson to lose his grip and fall away.

Six of the ten-man crew survived the war as PoWs - the dead were the pilot and co-pilot who fell without parachutes, the Radio man who was killed by fragments in the aircraft, during the flak hit, plus one man who later went wire happy whilst in a PoW camp and was lawfully shot whilst climbing the wire.
Found this pic which puts faces to names in my earlier post . . .

This is most of the crew of Aristocrap which went down over Bremen on November 26th 1943.

If you number consecutively, rear row 1 to 4 from left. and front row 5 to 8 ditto . . .

1611368677846.png


No 7 (dressed in Pinks and Greens) is the pilot, Lt Orville Castle, KIA when he jumped without his parachute which had been burnt.

No 5 is Lt Leon Anderson, co-pilot. His parachute was also burned, and he jumped holding on to Sgt Clint Logan. The shock of the canopy opening dislodged him, and he fell to his death, KIA.

Clint Logan is No 3. Top turret/Engineer

No 2 is Lawton Wilkes, waist gunner, who went wire happy and was shot dead as he was climbing the wire at Stalag 17B in October 1944.

No 1 is Sgt Francis Bousquet - small enough for the ball turret, he was a witness to the shooting of Wilkes.


No 6 is the bombardier, Lt Ken Williams. He became the centre of an enormous international propaganda incident and achieved notoriety or fame, depending on which side you are on . . . . but that's another story.

The two men in this pic that I have not so far named are Sgt Allen Bandy who was sick and did not fly on November 26th, and Lt Marion Cessna, navigator.

Not shown in this photo is Sgt Mike Beckett, Radio Op, who flew on November 26th and who was killed in the aircraft by flak.

Two men who were not regular members of the Castle crew, but who were making up the numbers on November 26th, were Sgts Robert L. Cheek and George W. Bond.
 

pooky

War Hero
In films.......when someone is in a room in the dark and they light one candle, the whole room lights up as though they had turned all the lights on.
 
When two people are having a conversation, a common staging device is one of them is facing the camera (though not looking into it) talking almost in a low voice with the other person behind them, and yet the person behind can still hear what’s being said.

There’s no “what was that”, “speak up”, or “can’t you turn around for phaks sake, I can’t hear you”.
 

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