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What things do you see all the time on TV or in Films?

Speaking of The Expanse, I caught up with Season 5 so far on Prime last night. At the end of the most recent episode Naomi takes a deep breath and makes her escape from one spacecraft to another by leaping out into space and allowing her momentum to carry her to the airlock door of the other ship, injecting herself with "hyperoxygenated blood" on the way. Whilst wearing her skintight waistcoat and leggings and nowt else.

Notwithstanding the effect of leaping into a vacuum with a chest full to the brim of air at normal atmospheric pressure and the freezing temperature if I remember rightly from high school physics, as the pressure drops so does the boiling point of water - which is why you can't brew a decent cuppa on the summit of Everest (the example given by my teacher). In fact, the boiling point of water drops to below normal human body temperature in vacuum and so al these movies where the Hapless One in the team gets a tear in their suit or something and the air slowly leaks out and the contents quietly suffocate when, in actuality, on contact with the vacuum or near-vacuum they would boil themselves and burst (we're 75% water, after all), assuming the suit kept them nice and warm.

Our lass jumped into the void nearly naked by comparison and so would probably have suffered a rapid enough drop in body temperature to get a way with a bit of light cell damage from the effect of body heat on the fluid component before freezing to death and her chest exploding long before she got anywhere near wielding the syringe let alone reaching the airlock and pulling herself inside. Pah!!!

Er, I might be overanalysing this a bit...
There is an Arthur C Clarke story where (nearly all) of a crew of a crippled spaceship are resuced en masse by this means. Severe sunburn is the worst most of them get (except for a bloke who screws up his jump).
 
Speaking of The Expanse, I caught up with Season 5 so far on Prime last night. At the end of the most recent episode Naomi takes a deep breath and makes her escape from one spacecraft to another by leaping out into space and allowing her momentum to carry her to the airlock door of the other ship, injecting herself with "hyperoxygenated blood" on the way. Whilst wearing her skintight waistcoat and leggings and nowt else.

Notwithstanding the effect of leaping into a vacuum with a chest full to the brim of air at normal atmospheric pressure and the freezing temperature if I remember rightly from high school physics, as the pressure drops so does the boiling point of water - which is why you can't brew a decent cuppa on the summit of Everest (the example given by my teacher). In fact, the boiling point of water drops to below normal human body temperature in vacuum and so al these movies where the Hapless One in the team gets a tear in their suit or something and the air slowly leaks out and the contents quietly suffocate when, in actuality, on contact with the vacuum or near-vacuum they would boil themselves and burst (we're 75% water, after all), assuming the suit kept them nice and warm.

Our lass jumped into the void nearly naked by comparison and so would probably have suffered a rapid enough drop in body temperature to get a way with a bit of light cell damage from the effect of body heat on the fluid component before freezing to death and her chest exploding long before she got anywhere near wielding the syringe let alone reaching the airlock and pulling herself inside. Pah!!!

Er, I might be overanalysing this a bit...
It's a vacuum, so there is no atmosphere to transfer the heat, so all heat loss would be by radiation, so relatively slow loss of heat. Totally agree however about the deep breath, that would cause severe expansion of the lungs/thorax. Nobody mentions the gut. All the interior gases in the gut would also expand, causing severe pain/discomfort and massive farts and belches.
My wife's nephew was a pilot in the Singapore Air Force, flying F16s, and he was a wee bit annoyed when I asked his kids to ask daddy about the giant farts he produced at max height.
 
I watched The Eagle Has Landed last night.

Donald Sutherland boards a Hun fighter wearing an aircrew parachute, and carrying hand luggage.

Pilot says he's gonna invert the plane and boyo will simply fall out.

Great plan.

Obviously, he turns up complete mit hand luggage at his intended destination . . .


And don't get me started on conversations between skydivers in freefall

Or folk hanging on to the chap wearing the parachute, not being jettisoned to their doom by the opening shock . . .
 
All the interior gases in the gut would also expand, causing severe pain/discomfort and massive farts and belches.
Based on personal experience over many years, the average skydiver's rectal sphincter gives up the unequal struggle with the expanding by-products of last night's beer and curry dinner at an altitude of almost exactly 3,000 feet AMSL.

Science, that is. Proper scientific method.
 
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I watched The Eagle Has Landed last night.

Donald Sutherland boards a Hun fighter wearing an aircrew parachute, and carrying hand luggage.

Pilot says he's gonna invert the plane and boyo will simply fall out.

Great plan.

Obviously, he turns up complete mit hand luggage at his intended destination . . .


And don't get me started on conversations between skydivers in freefall

Or folk hanging on to the chap wearing the parachute, not being jettisoned to their doom by the opening shock . . .

Christ, they've been giving that fillum a caning over the past few months. Also, that one set in North Africa with Richard Burton in it.
 
Christ, they've been giving that fillum a caning over the past few months. Also, that one set in North Africa with Richard Burton in it.
Nowt like it for high grade hokum though :-D That's a gold-plated cast, and a really easy 'watch' :thumleft: (even if young Jenny never gets'em out :-( )
 

bob231

War Hero
Speaking of The Expanse, I caught up with Season 5 so far on Prime last night. At the end of the most recent episode Naomi takes a deep breath and makes her escape from one spacecraft to another by leaping out into space and allowing her momentum to carry her to the airlock door of the other ship, injecting herself with "hyperoxygenated blood" on the way. Whilst wearing her skintight waistcoat and leggings and nowt else.

Notwithstanding the effect of leaping into a vacuum with a chest full to the brim of air at normal atmospheric pressure and the freezing temperature if I remember rightly from high school physics, as the pressure drops so does the boiling point of water - which is why you can't brew a decent cuppa on the summit of Everest (the example given by my teacher). In fact, the boiling point of water drops to below normal human body temperature in vacuum and so al these movies where the Hapless One in the team gets a tear in their suit or something and the air slowly leaks out and the contents quietly suffocate when, in actuality, on contact with the vacuum or near-vacuum they would boil themselves and burst (we're 75% water, after all), assuming the suit kept them nice and warm.

Our lass jumped into the void nearly naked by comparison and so would probably have suffered a rapid enough drop in body temperature to get a way with a bit of light cell damage from the effect of body heat on the fluid component before freezing to death and her chest exploding long before she got anywhere near wielding the syringe let alone reaching the airlock and pulling herself inside. Pah!!!

Er, I might be overanalysing this a bit...
This gets more attention in the books (worth a read BTW!). She does get pretty badly damaged: bruising on all exposed skin as internal blood vessels burst, sunburn, I think eye and ear damage. The pressure differential isn't enough to make your chest explode: normal Earth atmosphere to hard vacuum is the same as surfacing rapidly from all of ten metres down. Might be painful but not enough to be catastrophic.
 

NSP

LE
Christ, they've been giving that fillum a caning over the past few months. Also, that one set in North Africa with Richard Burton in it.
Raid on Rommel?

It's a remake of Tobruk, with the close up scenes of Rock Hudson and George Peppard replaced with the Burton ones. Watch them both and see how many scenes are identical footage.

 

NSP

LE
This gets more attention in the books (worth a read BTW!). She does get pretty badly damaged: bruising on all exposed skin as internal blood vessels burst, sunburn, I think eye and ear damage. The pressure differential isn't enough to make your chest explode: normal Earth atmosphere to hard vacuum is the same as surfacing rapidly from all of ten metres down. Might be painful but not enough to be catastrophic.
I reckon she'd be asking for an embolism at the least.

Edited to add: let's look it up instead of speculating on school lessons taken 35 years ago, or thereabouts:-


Seems I was partially right on the cooking yourself front, plus the need to factor in the decompression when she dumps the airlock to escape:-

"The absence of normal atmospheric pressure (the air pressure found at Earth’s surface) is probably of greater concern than temperature to an individual exposed to the vacuum of space [1]. Upon sudden decompression in vacuum, expansion of air in a person’s lungs is likely to cause lung rupture and death unless that air is immediately exhaled. Decompression can also lead to a possibly fatal condition called ebullism, where reduced pressure of the environment lowers the boiling temperature of body fluids and initiates transition of liquid water in the bloodstream and soft tissues into water vapor [2]. At minimum, ebullism will cause tissue swelling and bruising due to the formation of water vapor under the skin; at worst, it can give rise to an embolism, or blood vessel blockage due to gas bubbles in the bloodstream.

Our dependence on a continuous supply of oxygen is the more limiting factor to the amount of time a human could survive in a full vacuum. Contrary to how the lungs are supposed to function at atmospheric pressure, oxygen diffuses out of the bloodstream when the lungs are exposed to a vacuum. This leads to a condition called hypoxia, or oxygen deprivation. Within 15 seconds, deoxygenated blood begins to be delivered to the brain, whereupon unconsciousness results [1]. Data from animal experiments and training accidents suggest that an individual could survive at least another minute in a vacuum while unconscious, but not much longer [3,4].
"
 

bob231

War Hero
Huh. You learn something new every day!

I guess it wasn't that strongly researched for that bit. Or a chunk of creative liberty! The book still has her in bits for quite some time afterward and it is less of a "hold your breath and jump" scene.
 
In American cop shows in particular:

There’s a briefing (often in front of some incredibly high tech PowerPoint screen) and one Detective/FBI agent starts the briefing.

There’s never any fumbling or ‘where’s the full screen button’. They never go backwards in the presentation by mistake. There’s never a duff graphic.

Then, at some random point, mid-paragraph, the first presenter will have over to the next one: well not really a handover- the first one takes a breath and then the second presenter takes over without a second’s pause.
 
Raid on Rommel?

It's a remake of Tobruk, with the close up scenes of Rock Hudson and George Peppard replaced with the Burton ones. Watch them both and see how many scenes are identical footage.

If you wish to really switch off look for Death race where the Germans pursue Doug McClure


Both films with just the right technical science faction

the land that time forgot

the people that time forgot

I defy any one to say they ain’t classics
 

syrup

LE
In American cop shows in particular:

There’s a briefing (often in front of some incredibly high tech PowerPoint screen) and one Detective/FBI agent starts the briefing.

There’s never any fumbling or ‘where’s the full screen button’. They never go backwards in the presentation by mistake. There’s never a duff graphic.

Then, at some random point, mid-paragraph, the first presenter will have over to the next one: well not really a handover- the first one takes a breath and then the second presenter takes over without a second’s pause.


Nobody all siting round mouthing ****** and nodding towards the bloke doing the presentation as the wheel of death spins as the wifi buffers again.
Also nobody questions the money spent on massive touch screen 8k TV's
 

syrup

LE
If you wish to really switch off look for Death race where the Germans pursue Doug McClure


Both films with just the right technical science faction

the land that time forgot

the people that time forgot

I defy any one to say they ain’t classics

Lots of it in modern films and t.v. also

In We were soldiers when they call broken arrow it's footage from 3 or 4 different films.
A lot of the time the U.S. Navy helpfully puts fleet numbers on the nose of the aircraft so 114 takes off 167 flies along 172 lands.
 

NSP

LE
Lots of it in modern films and t.v. also

In We were soldiers when they call broken arrow it's footage from 3 or 4 different films.
A lot of the time the U.S. Navy helpfully puts fleet numbers on the nose of the aircraft so 114 takes off 167 flies along 172 lands.
It's worse than that - there's plenty of movies where the cuts of the heroes/"cavalry to the rescue" flight from external close-up to long-shot and back feature entirely different aircraft types.
 

syrup

LE
I'm not understanding what that means at all.

if you watch films particurely with the F14 in they have a number on the nose.
So F14 number 114 is seen lining up on the catapult and takes off
Then they zoom into the cockpit to see our hero but on the zoom in we see the aircraft number is now 203
As they zoom back out to see the formation the aircraft number is now 404 and so on until number 503 lands and our man climbs out
 

Joker62

ADC
Book Reviewer
if you watch films particurely with the F14 in they have a number on the nose.
So F14 number 114 is seen lining up on the catapult and takes off
Then they zoom into the cockpit to see our hero but on the zoom in we see the aircraft number is now 203
As they zoom back out to see the formation the aircraft number is now 404 and so on until number 503 lands and our man climbs out
Just goes to prove how many they wreck and how many takes it took to get the scene right.
 
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