What things do you see all the time on TV or in Films?

I think we need to take a step back here, a lot of posts are delving into filming procedures and not 'tropes.'
Mistakes are fair game as are duplicate plot lines and actions that match the thread title.

Film sets and what not sometimes need to be built larger, lighting is necessary to see wtf is going on,
both are required to allow the fffffffing film to be made in the 1st place. :)

ps: Info posts are always welcome.
 
I think we need to take a step back here, a lot of posts are delving into filming procedures and not 'tropes.'
Mistakes are fair game as are duplicate plot lines and actions that match the thread title.

Film sets and what not sometimes need to be built larger, lighting is necessary to see wtf is going on,
both are required to allow the fffffffing film to be made in the 1st place. :)

ps: Info posts are always welcome.

I watch films for entertainment not to pick up on mistakes or wrong doing
 

NSP

LE
Small point of order to your eminently good post, if I may? The vehicle was an M8 AGS, I believe.
I said, "Something like..."

Meanwhile, why did I instinctively think "Tiger" when I saw this photo...?

M8-Ridgeway-AGS.gif
 

NSP

LE
The beast or beast of war as it’s sometimes listed as, very underrated film.
They used five T-55s they got from the Israelis, apparently. Two for exterior shots and three for interior shots, two with sections of turret and hull armour cut out to let the cameras have a view inside. The interior shot tank with no cut outs was for the shots from a low angle looking up, such as when Daskel is giving his "Tankboy" story - where the cut outs in the turret wall would have been seen in shot.
 

NSP

LE
When there's a fracas with the hijackers that involves a burst going into the cockpit it takes out both pilots but never knacks anything critical avionics or instrumentation-wise. And there is always someone onboard who can fly whatever type of 'plane it is, whether the main or secondary hero or some other significant character.
 
When there's a fracas with the hijackers that involves a burst going into the cockpit it takes out both pilots but never knacks anything critical avionics or instrumentation-wise. And there is always someone onboard who can fly whatever type of 'plane it is, whether the main or secondary hero or some other significant character.
Executive Decision had a scene where the bad guy sprayed the cockpit from outside with an uzi, somehow killing both pilots but not hitting a single instrument. Then Kurt Russells character lands the plane because he had been learning to fly single engine cessnas.

I remember Mythbusters took a crack at the "Someone with video game flying skills can land a plane in real life" but I can't remember the outcome of it.
 

NSP

LE
Executive Decision
Actually, in that one a few MFDs do get knacked. Although the solution to every cockpit alarm seems to be to remember to alter the state of the undercarriage (if it's up put it down and vice versa).
 

NSP

LE
Executive Decision had a scene where the bad guy sprayed the cockpit from outside with an uzi, somehow killing both pilots but not hitting a single instrument. Then Kurt Russells character lands the plane because he had been learning to fly single engine cessnas
A Skorpion, as it happens, and as I point out above there IS a bit of panel damage.

Plenty of other movies where the pilots get knacked but no instruments or systems are hit.
 
Actually, in that one a few MFDs do get knacked. Although the solution to every cockpit alarm seems to be to remember to alter the state of the undercarriage (if it's up put it down and vice versa).
And the flaps as well IIRC

Haven't seen it in ages, but it's all coming back to me.
 
Frank Tallman, who you mention, was also a stunt pilot and business associate of Mantz. Tallman died when he crashed a light aircraft in bad weather in the late ‘70s.
As a matter of interest, it was Mantz who flew the B-17 in 12 o’ Clock High for the famous belly landing opening scene (where a wing takes out a ground crew tent IIRC)


The rest of the scene ( the dying pilot with an exposed brain, and the shot off arm of the flight engineer/top turret gunner) is based on the real-life case of John “Red” Morgan, co-pilot, who was awarded the Medal of Honor for his actions.
Must find the film , amazing flying , looking at the slight damage to the prop tips. He knew what he was doing.

Think about it today , Take this working B17 and crash it onto the grass. balls of steel.
 

NSP

LE
And the flaps as well IIRC

Haven't seen it in ages, but it's all coming back to me.
Nah - once the flaps are down they stay down - Kurt asks Halle how much flap he can put down at 170kts Halle scans the manual and says, "At 170kts as much flap as you like."

Jeez...
 
Must find the film , amazing flying , looking at the slight damage to the prop tips. He knew what he was doing.

Think about it today , Take this working B17 and crash it onto the grass. balls of steel.
Bit of trivia he demanded $5K for that landing stunt and only relented to a lower amount when the Numerous USAAF pilots helping the film who had done similar landings for real offered to do it for nothing.
 
Executive Decision had a scene where the bad guy sprayed the cockpit from outside with an uzi, somehow killing both pilots but not hitting a single instrument. Then Kurt Russells character lands the plane because he had been learning to fly single engine cessnas.

I remember Mythbusters took a crack at the "Someone with video game flying skills can land a plane in real life" but I can't remember the outcome of it.
IIRC it didn’t end well.
 
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