What should I choose? Officer or Soldier?

Knightwars4

Old-Salt
Would you agree with me on my attitude towards life?

Damn what the world wants, needs, believes etc. Damn everything about people. Just carry on with what your doing and the all the BS around you. As it's your life, not theirs. I can be whomever I choose to be with no regard to what anybody wants me to be or should become etc.
 
Knightwars4:
Nope :)

As far as making your own decisions on what you need for you I'll go along some way.

If you end up though just out for you though, without values and standards, and without regard for those around you, you have to consider your career choice carefully.

Banker or politician would seem two good choices?

Teamworking of any kind may seem attractive, but if your values were as above, you will not make it, you'll get caught out, and when you need the leg up it won't be there.

I_even_disarm_ducks
Well done for catching yourself early enough! I had such ambitions, put off until I got through college, still had the intention, went to industry to get the experience for professional qualification. Couple of years, couple of promotions, another couple of years, age 25, looked again, by then earning more than an Army Major, so never did it!

Not the only regret of my life, but in the top three.
 

Fezzick

War Hero
Would you agree with me on my attitude towards life?

Damn what the world wants, needs, believes etc. Damn everything about people. Just carry on with what your doing and the all the BS around you. As it's your life, not theirs. I can be whomever I choose to be with no regard to what anybody wants me to be or should become etc.
...as much as the inner wah alarm has been going all thread, that's not the best outlook for a career in the military. Try the civil service?
 

Knightwars4

Old-Salt
So adopting that attitude is no go. Anyway, I was just suggesting it in hopes of finding out if it's a good one or not.
 
It's a case of appreciating what people want for me and understanding their worries, but getting them to understand my needs. Simply telling them that their opinion doesn't matter and they can basically go **** themselves only causes more harm than good. It took me this long to really understand this, once you have peoples understanding, you have their trust. And trust, given and received, goes a long way!
 

Knightwars4

Old-Salt
So what's RMAS like? I know it is difficult (Or so I think), can be quite tedious etc.
What do you do, when, how? Do all Officers undergo the same training as each other? Or is it subject to Corps/Regiment your joining?
 

SudoCreme

Old-Salt
There's lots of exciting writing and videos on the Atmy's Sandhurst pages-it's like a chocolate selection box for potential officer types...so I'm told.
 

siz_87

Clanker
So what's RMAS like? I know it is difficult (Or so I think), can be quite tedious etc.
What do you do, when, how? Do all Officers undergo the same training as each other? Or is it subject to Corps/Regiment your joining?
you do realise that arrse isn't the Army recruiting website and British Army Website actually has a fair few useful tips on what goes on in the ENTIRE army?
 
I wouldn't know, i'm going in as soldier. But i'll let you know when they select me for commissioning and ask me to be director special forces ;)
 
I can't comment too much on what you do and when, as I'm reliably informed that the course has changed a bit since I did it. Roughly - first 5 weeks used to be there to "mirror" phase 1 training for a soldier - lots of bullshit, lots of loss of freedoms, working up to an exercise/navigation task, the carrot being you then got to leave RMAS for the first time on a weekend pass. Thereafter, your leadership skills are honed, with the physical aspect ramping up incrementally throughout the year and the academic stuff being more focused. I believe now that the trg (rightly) is designed to prepare the OCdt and 2Lt-to-be for the OP tour that will be his or hers within about 5 mins of commissioning and the particular strains that places on them. RMAS is the same for most Officers, exceptions being Professionally Qualified Officers (PQOs) like doctors and vets etc - they do a different course.

Then, having commissioned, you will be subject to your corps/regiment of choice's Young Officer (YO) training routine. Some send you straight on a YOs course from RMAS (Inf do PCBC or whatever it's called today, RA do YOs at Larkhill) to prepare you for life as a YO in your new Regiment or Corps. Others send you to a unit, as a no-experience crow to do 6 months and then do a YOs course (never saw the logic in this - surely you would only end up making brews and being criticised as useless) - I believe RSignals go this way.

As for is it difficult - yes, of course, but you can make it easier by being as prepared for certain elements as possible - being fit before you arrive, not using the course to become fit, being mentally prepared etc. This is the contentious point - having prior military knowledge is not always a good thing - one guy in my Pl was ex-21 SAS - he was told by the then commandant (also ex-SAS) to put a lid on his SF learning and be prepare to learn things conventionally during his time at RMAS. Things are done to a pattern and while prior experience may help you come up with an answer for a problem, or contribute to an answer, it may not be THE way it needs to be done.

Is it tedious? Well, that depends on you - can you cope with a lack of personal freedom (the forces is good for that in general, more so in training) and an increase in the intensity of your routine (I guarantee NOTHING - well not many things - you do before will be as intense). You settle into the "game", learn the rules and should pop out the other end with a pip. Is it tedious - if you think so, you probably wont like serving full stop. I could see how you could become frustrated at training for a job for a year without actually doing the job, but it prepared me very well, with a YOs course straight after adding the RA specific stuff to the general officer training.
 
Hi man,

I think it awesome your thinking about all this now, I certainly did when I was a kid,
One thing to say is that your education will lead to to what you want....if you crack that phd you could be flying rockets or something crazy like that without even expecting it...
the Paras and SAS are pretty amazing but they only have a precision effect on a specific battle space. There are some many other ways you could make a career in the forces that would have a much greater effect on more people, such as in the engineers and military R&D...
But above all remember your still young so keep your options and mind open and hell if you become an para/SAS astrophysicist bloody good job
 

Knightwars4

Old-Salt
Para/SAS/Astrophysicist (Phd) I am ambitious. I've also considered the Weapons/Defence/Intelligence and any form of Military Industrial complex careers.
 
I want to see combat (I know am ignorant and young when it comes to contacts)
I have read Andy McNab and other somewhat "credible" authors.

SAS. Then I'll leave the Regiment and go British Intelligence or the Circuit.
Andy McStab is hardly a 'credible' author. It seems he's just a backstabbing **** who blames B20's failure on his deceased comrades.
 

Soldier_Why

LE
Moderator
Andy McStab is hardly a 'credible' author. It seems he's just a backstabbing **** who blames B20's failure on his deceased comrades.
I've not heard that, it's also not the impression I got from B20 (the book). Chris Ryan's effort on the other hand seems to blame every fecker but him.
 

Knightwars4

Old-Salt
'Credible' with apostrophes for a reason. McNab doesn't blame the failure of B20 on his patrol. He blames the bloke who gave him the wrong radio frequencies for the mission, for the different times of day. The radio used by the patrol was also faulty and needed a spare battery unit.
 

_Fordy

Swinger
Welbeck is not really an option if he wants to join the Parachute Regiment. Welbexians are expected to join CS and CSS arms and services and may only join the teeth arms by exception (unless they have changed the rules since I was at Sandhurst).
Fair point. You're correct the rules are still the same;

They're in discussion for change over the next year or two. If you went in now you'd have to be "an aspiring technical officer", but you might find you could change your choice over the coming years.

(Source: ACA)
 

Knightwars4

Old-Salt
Ignore this space. I can't delete this post from an iPhone.
 

Dankr0

Crow
Hi there.

I'm deciding to post here because my predicament is reasonably similar. Before I start I'd like to say this isn't a 'wah' or whatever you guys call it.

I'm 16, so I'm just finishing my GCSE's and will be going into sixth form to study A-Levels at my current school. However my predicament comes after that in what is probably one of the biggest problems potential officers face: to go to university or join up straight away.

One thing I've seen is people saying they regret the time they spent wasting doing stuff they didn't really feel suited them. Obviously, a university place doesn't really help me in any way progressing through RMAS and the subsequent YO training in whatever regiment I choose/chooses me, but I've recently read somewhere that 70-80% of officers that join up are graduates, which makes me wonder.

Another factor is seeing where I am in the two years when I make my choice. I think I'd probably start my application half-way through my sixth form education, roughly in 2012, so that I can review my options more clearly there.

The final factor I think I need to reflect on is if the Army is not for me (which it could most certainly be) then I could easily leave after a relatively short period of time and go for a degree or go into work.

So what I'd mainly like to ask you is does going to university a personal matter which would mean that you're more mature and possibly better prepared or does it not matter in the slightest? What is the Army's and certain regiments view on graduates and is there any preference and finally are potential officers allowed to leaves RMAS after a certain period of time?

Also I'd love to be a Royal Gurkha Parachutist who moonlights in the the Secret Intelligence Service whilst using my job in NASA as a cover.
 

_Fordy

Swinger
The majority of officer cadets who are not graduates are ex or serving soldiers. I think you'd probably have to be pretty outstanding elsewhere, or have a pretty good reason for not studying for a degree to succeed without having gone to university first.

As for "allowed to leave RMAS after a certain period of time" - what do you mean? RMAS is just the school, if you will, for training officers. Once you've completed the 48 weeks, you're done.

If you mean what's the minimum length of service, it's 3 years after the date at which you pass out from RMAS.


Also I'd love to be a Royal Gurkha Parachutist who moonlights in the the Secret Intelligence Service whilst using my job in NASA as a cover.

Oh you dark horse you...
 

Knightwars4

Old-Salt
Hi there.

I'm deciding to post here because my predicament is reasonably similar. Before I start I'd like to say this isn't a 'wah' or whatever you guys call it.

I'm 16, so I'm just finishing my GCSE's and will be going into sixth form to study A-Levels at my current school. However my predicament comes after that in what is probably one of the biggest problems potential officers face: to go to university or join up straight away.

One thing I've seen is people saying they regret the time they spent wasting doing stuff they didn't really feel suited them. Obviously, a university place doesn't really help me in any way progressing through RMAS and the subsequent YO training in whatever regiment I choose/chooses me, but I've recently read somewhere that 70-80% of officers that join up are graduates, which makes me wonder.

Another factor is seeing where I am in the two years when I make my choice. I think I'd probably start my application half-way through my sixth form education, roughly in 2012, so that I can review my options more clearly there.

The final factor I think I need to reflect on is if the Army is not for me (which it could most certainly be) then I could easily leave after a relatively short period of time and go for a degree or go into work.

So what I'd mainly like to ask you is does going to university a personal matter which would mean that you're more mature and possibly better prepared or does it not matter in the slightest? What is the Army's and certain regiments view on graduates and is there any preference and finally are potential officers allowed to leaves RMAS after a certain period of time?

Also I'd love to be a Royal Gurkha Parachutist who moonlights in the the Secret Intelligence Service whilst using my job in NASA as a cover.
I would say go university to study a science, though not a social science. If you study any of the three core disciples, Bio, Chem or Physics then your fine. Social scientists are the punch line to a bad joke.
 

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