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What now for the EU ?

Notwithstanding your last para which really can not be disputed, your post would seem to remove the ECJ from the list of competent tribunals for this case.

Hmmmmm

The commission’s letter is the start of a lengthy process that could end up in the European court of justice. The EU court in Luxembourg could impose huge daily fines for continued breaches.


I don't think the EU has anywhere else it could actually go.

However, I did find this

Article 86(1) of the WA makes it clear that any cases pending before the CJEU at the end of the transition period will fall within the CJEU’s jurisdiction until they are finalised. This includes decisions on appeals.

Article 87 of the WA adds to this more specifically. It states that the European Commission has four years from the end of the transition period to bring infringement proceedings against the UK for breaches of EU law that took place during the transition period.


I'm still trying to work out if the WA is null & void if no deal transpires and the UK reverts to WTO.
 
Hmmmmm




I don't think the EU has anywhere else it could actually go.

However, I did find this




I'm still trying to work out if the WA is null & void if no deal transpires and the UK reverts to WTO.
Ref your last para, I rather thought that would be the case: the argument will revolve around the actual date on which the UK left the EU, or whether the transition period, which the UK currently enjoys means the UK is still a full member.
Frankly, the EU is on a hiding to nothing on this one.
Despite all the shouting and screaming by the usual suspects and their fellow travellers, the UK Govt has not breached any law, international or national, by introducing the IM Bill.
Indeed, it could be argued it is the EU in breach of international law by attempting to usurp the determinate rights of a sovereign nation.
 

oldbaldy

LE
Moderator
Ref your last para, I rather thought that would be the case: the argument will revolve around the actual date on which the UK left the EU, or whether the transition period, which the UK currently enjoys means the UK is still a full member.
Frankly, the EU is on a hiding to nothing on this one.
Despite all the shouting and screaming by the usual suspects and their fellow travellers, the UK Govt has not breached any law, international or national, by introducing the IM Bill.
Indeed, it could be argued it is the EU in breach of international law by attempting to usurp the determinate rights of a sovereign nation.
For them preserve the EU single market ithey have to destroy the UK. I think they are desperately trying to work out how the EU will have to have a hard border between NI and Eire when the UK won't have one at our end.
 
Spare a though for all the Remainiac sperm that’s died a lonely death today at the thought BREXIT might be stopped at yet another final EUtopian hurdle.
 

skid2

LE
Book Reviewer
Agreed.



After all, it is part of the WA :) :)


The UKs defence of it's behaviour has been likened to someone caught carrying an illegal knife. And saying that he hasn't used it yet as a defence for his action.

Still its good to know its all going well.
7C6C4FD4-195D-4651-9349-D53DA1FE8534.jpeg
 
The UKs defence of it's behaviour has been likened to someone caught carrying an illegal knife. And saying that he hasn't used it yet as a defence for his action.

Still its good to know its all going well.View attachment 508847

Your potatoes have been duly noted.

Tell us all again what International Law the UK is breaking by invoking a section contained within the WA that the EU has signed off ?
 

Truxx

LE
Meh.

IIRC the amount potentially extractable doesn't meet the UK's future EV needs, even more so if large scale capacitors/storage batteries across the grid become feasible.

Also, cheaper lithium from overseas may under cut UK production costs.

Energy transfers (I.e wood to coal, coal to oil, oil to gas) have 2 key elements; an increase in energy density and a cheaper cost. (Aka more bang for your energy buck).

Renewables & batteries offer neither.
Don't worry. The idea that the future of vehicles lies in remotely produced electricity are simply grasping at straws. The answer might include some electric vehicles drawing power from battery sources but other technologies such as fuel cells, including hydrogen, are much more viable.
 

Truxx

LE
Ref your last para, I rather thought that would be the case: the argument will revolve around the actual date on which the UK left the EU, or whether the transition period, which the UK currently enjoys means the UK is still a full member.
Frankly, the EU is on a hiding to nothing on this one.
Despite all the shouting and screaming by the usual suspects and their fellow travellers, the UK Govt has not breached any law, international or national, by introducing the IM Bill.
Indeed, it could be argued it is the EU in breach of international law by attempting to usurp the determinate rights of a sovereign nation.
And to force an issue that is as much in breach of not one but two pre existing bilaterals one of which, the CTA predated the EU by some margin, is as much in breach of "international law" as the potential and as yet untested measures contained in the IM bill. See 84 seat majority for details.
 

Blogg

LE
What they said. Typical European Commission stunt.


"The choice for legal action is more about buying time than about actual punishment. And it is also about preventing London from blaming Brussels in the event that the two sides fail to reach a deal.

The legal road for the EU is long and uncertain, with no indication when such a process would be completed in the courts. That leaves Brussels plenty of time to reach a political agreement, while at the same time holding some kind of threat alive."


 
The poor EU....

it’s facing a desperate problem.

on paper, it’s a superpower, but thanks to its members vetos, in reality, it’s only as powerful as it’s weakest member allows it to be.

see Cyprus stopping the EU putting Russia on a naughty step.
 
I really, really hope loads of countries start taking the EU to court now for when it broke/bent the rules - Karma is a bitch.
 

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