What now for the EU ?

Oyibo

LE
About 70 percent of the prescription medicines consumed in the UK come via the EU.

Hope this helps.
Does that take into account Rotterdam?
 
About 70 percent of the prescription medicines consumed in the UK come via the EU.

Hope this helps.
It might, if you could prove it, instead of guffing from the sidelines.....here's a helpful tip: The figures you are going to amaze us with should not include the UK as part of the EU for accounting purposes, and should include the location that said pharma was produced.
I'll wait for you to tell us that 70% of our pharma is PRODUCED in the EU. :cool:
 

Trans-sane

LE
Book Reviewer
It might, if you could prove it, instead of guffing from the sidelines.....here's a helpful tip: The figures you are going to amaze us with should not include the UK as part of the EU for accounting purposes, and should include the location that said pharma was produced.
I'll wait for you to tell us that 70% of our pharma is PRODUCED in the EU. :cool:
And you'll never get a solid answer because it's been made deliberately more complex than it needs to be. An awful lot of packets of generic tablets and capsules have "Made in Cyprus" on them. But this is hugely misleading as mostly what is done is bulk powders of the active drugs and the purified excipients are compacted into tablets or blended and packaged into capsule then packaged into foil blisters. And a significant quantity is bulk packages of already manufactured tablets that are just packaged in Cyprus.

So where is the "real" manufacturing occurring? Mostly the UK or Germany. But again complicated by the various component chemicals are made in the UK or Germany, shipped to another plant for an additional process, shipped to yet another plant with other materials to be made into finished tablets, then possibly be shipped to yet another plant to have a coating applied.
 

Penfold

Swinger
The UK would seem to have a simple answer. State loudly and publicly that legally asylum seekers must seek asylum in the first country they reach that offers safety - France meting that criteria.

Wordsmith
I thought that was ALREADY a requirement under UN(?) refugee rules & regulations.
 
Mein Gott in Himmel ! How old are you guys ?

1977 it was almost exactly 4DM to the £.

Thats 3 x that rate !
The answer is 1971. That's the year that the Bretton Woods Agreement collapsed and the Pound went from being a fixed rate currency to a free floating one. Comedians will also say that it was also the year of decimalisation when we went from 240d in the £ to 100p. There is actually a small element of truth in that as price rounding caused a rise in inflation that also reduced the value of the Pound.
 

Truxx

LE
And you'll never get a solid answer because it's been made deliberately more complex than it needs to be. An awful lot of packets of generic tablets and capsules have "Made in Cyprus" on them. But this is hugely misleading as mostly what is done is bulk powders of the active drugs and the purified excipients are compacted into tablets or blended and packaged into capsule then packaged into foil blisters. And a significant quantity is bulk packages of already manufactured tablets that are just packaged in Cyprus.

So where is the "real" manufacturing occurring? Mostly the UK or Germany. But again complicated by the various component chemicals are made in the UK or Germany, shipped to another plant for an additional process, shipped to yet another plant with other materials to be made into finished tablets, then possibly be shipped to yet another plant to have a coating applied.
The more you look the more you do see deliberate complexity. By weaving a high level of commercial interdependence you start to make things much more obscure and much easier to play tunes. Control in other words. Taken to absurd lengths (Mini engines for example) the creeping knitting together of dependency is an excellent method of coercion.

All of which flies in the face of common sense and the emerging public mood on the environment.

So obviously an EU ploy.
 
Some of us were serving in 1968 when it was circa 10DM to the £ and beer was 50pfgs , single spirits was 50pfgs a large nip and coke was 1 mark a bottle !
Yes, but after stoppages for pipe clay, there wasn't much left from your threepence-ha'penny-a-week, so you may as well've stayed in your square.
 

Trans-sane

LE
Book Reviewer
The more you look the more you do see deliberate complexity. By weaving a high level of commercial interdependence you start to make things much more obscure and much easier to play tunes. Control in other words. Taken to absurd lengths (Mini engines for example) the creeping knitting together of dependency is an excellent method of coercion.

All of which flies in the face of common sense and the emerging public mood on the environment.

So obviously an EU ploy.
I'm almost certain there is a tax or subsidies element. Given the regulatory burden it makes no sense to have so many cross-border moves and different facilities (all needing at least bi-annual inspection). The paperwork it entails adds man-years rather than man hours to everything which quite understandably then adds to staffing costs and other overhead such as transport and warehousing costs. Hell, just reviewing the CofCs from another division of the same company, and carrying out a basic visual inspection, for one series of products when they arrive with us takes two QCs at least half a day twice per week. Its stuff we make on our site when we have spare production capacity, using exactly the same raw materials (which also come the german factory the products we are reviewing come from) and using exactly the same format of documentation we would be using. And still it is a time sink. Multiple different companies, with multiple different sources, all of which need to be logged, recorded and confirmed as GMP fit for use at every step before being used in packaging/manufacturing? No way in hell it makes more commercial sense unless there are subsidies or dodgy tax refunds going on.
 
At one time it was the same as a pint of bitter in UK - twelve to the pound.

Mind you, with Bafs you didn't need DM until it was time to return to the UK.
Bafs! Bloody'ell. I shall henceforth see you as ancienchurchill! Or even ancienmother or ancienlittle willy
 
I'll just leave this here for @irlsgt, who appears to get his panties in a twist about trade deals

The UK and Japan hope to agree the details of a post-Brexit trade agreement by the end of the month.

The two sides said they had made progress during two days of face-to-face talks in London.

Japanese Foreign Minister Toshimitsu Motegi said there was "substantial" agreement in most areas.

That is what can be achieved in 7 months when one Party is not trying to subjugate the other Party.
 

Truxx

LE
I'm almost certain there is a tax or subsidies element. Given the regulatory burden it makes no sense to have so many cross-border moves and different facilities (all needing at least bi-annual inspection). The paperwork it entails adds man-years rather than man hours to everything which quite understandably then adds to staffing costs and other overhead such as transport and warehousing costs. Hell, just reviewing the CofCs from another division of the same company, and carrying out a basic visual inspection, for one series of products when they arrive with us takes two QCs at least half a day twice per week. Its stuff we make on our site when we have spare production capacity, using exactly the same raw materials (which also come the german factory the products we are reviewing come from) and using exactly the same format of documentation we would be using. And still it is a time sink. Multiple different companies, with multiple different sources, all of which need to be logged, recorded and confirmed as GMP fit for use at every step before being used in packaging/manufacturing? No way in hell it makes more commercial sense unless there are subsidies or dodgy tax refunds going on.
How dare you come in here with your facts and question the wisdom of these things? It is the commercial equivalent of divide and conquer.

Anyone who thinks that it all makes sense is as vacuous as those who declare that EU trade is so important. The reason we do a bit of trade with others and they with us is pure happenstance and in some cases daft things are done purely because they can not because they should. I believe the federalists know full well what they are up to.
 

Wordsmith

LE
Book Reviewer
I'll just leave this here for @irlsgt, who appears to get his panties in a twist about trade deals


That is what can be achieved in 7 months when one Party is not trying to subjugate the other Party.
This is precisely why the EU is trying to tie the UK into EU rules and regulations - it makes signing FTA's with other countries more difficult.

And every FTA the UK signs is liable to lead to erosion of the EU's market share in the UK. Japan will have freer access to UK markets than when we were an EU member. No more protectionist single market barriers to trade.

And there is a lot of empirical evidence to show that the more two countries trade - the faster that trade grows. Trade with Japan is a bit of an oddity as they have their own peculiar business culture, but there will be a growing market for goods perceived as uniquely British.

Wordsmith
 
I suspect on the NHS score that it is getting at least the amount you misquoted and a great deal more.

So off you toddle back into obscurity and when you feel up to it pop back in and have another go at being a Projekt Fear useful idiot.
Except I'm right, which annoys far too many grown men.

The NHS really won't be getting £350m due to our leaving the EU,

Honest.
 

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