What now for the EU ?

Euro reach is w@nk. 100% restriction of free trade.

US reloading powders banned en masse, but strangely, the same powder in a US made factory round is untouched, well quelle surprise! Very few of the reloading powders are used in factory rounds.
What’s that, Vitavouhri in Finland has all its powders nodded through?
It ignores the fact that that each country does it's own research where it's warranted, but the cost is borne by those wanting the research done. If it's in the EU's interests then the countries companies get some of their contributions back in the form of rebates or grants. The EU then claims the right to licence them for EU wide use even if only one or two countries make the product. This isn't a case of EU driven or instigated research.
 
Is COSHH not still around? Is that the answer?

Nope. CoSHH is about use of substances at the point of work.

REACH is about approval of chemicals for production and industrial use.



Certainly feed in to each other, but separate.

Like a driving licence (CoSHH) and type approval for a car (REACH).
 

Wordsmith

LE
Book Reviewer
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Wordsmith

LE
Book Reviewer
easy

we can make products based on genuine safety, not the spurious EU standards designed to exclude non Eu products Avd export products that actually work to the other 85% of the world.

see our excellent BS electrical standards, not the utterly meaningless EU CE ones.
Given that UK standards are in many cases higher than EU ones, that points to a clear post Brexit strategy: require all imports to the UK to conform to UK standards - and (where possible) increase the number of standards that are greater than EU ones. That'll mean that UK manufacturers can produce for both the domestic and EU markets, while EU manufacturers will not find it so easy to do the reverse. That should be entirely legal under WTO rules because individual countries are not being discriminated against, just asked to met a common standard.

I can't say for sure, because I'm not a legal expert, but I think this is another reason that the EU wanted a 'level playing field' - if the UK is free to impose it's own standards, it becomes more difficult for the EU to sell into the UK post Brexit. At the moment standards are common across the EU - even in the UK - i.e. we have had to adopt lower EU standards (my emphasis).

At national level, standardisation is managed by national standardisation bodies (NSBs) who adopt and publish national standards. The NSBs also transpose all European standards as identical national standards and withdraw any conflicting national standards.
Another example of how the UK can look after it's own interests post Brexit.

Wordsmith
 
You decided to bring significant others into it. Perhaps you forgot?
Fire away.

Why would I be concerned by the comments of a bona fide idiot on an internet forum? If you think for a moment that what you type has any significance beyond your own fertile imagination, then you're even more deluded that I had imagined.

PS, it's not my "significant other" who's "playing" with the "robot hoover".
 
I can't say for sure, because I'm not a legal expert, but I think this is another reason that the EU wanted a 'level playing field' - if the UK is free to impose it's own standards, it becomes more difficult for the EU to sell into the UK post Brexit.
If the UK wanted to be a complete C**t over EU imports. All they have to do is apply '' Country of Origin '' Rules.

Something that I am very surprised that the Japanese ( as far as I know ) have not taken the EU to task over.
 

Auld-Yin

ADC
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
If the UK wanted to be a complete C**t over EU imports. All they have to do is apply '' Country of Origin '' Rules.

Something that I am very surprised that the Japanese ( as far as I know ) have not taken the EU to task over.
We just need to ban anything with the CE mark! :)
 
Most competent electricians will stiffly ignore CE marked EUropean stuff, much of which comes from such well known bastions of electrical engineering like Bulgaria.

whats that, the CE marked crap is actually made in godknowswhereistan, is trucked in to Bulgaria, retail packed and sold on as ‘Made in EU’
 

exsniffer

Old-Salt
I thought the CE mark stood for Chinese Export. The Saudi oil firm I worked for would not let the residents of ccmpany housing use any electrical equipment which only had a CE marking
 
I thought the CE mark stood for Chinese Export. The Saudi oil firm I worked for would not let the residents of ccmpany housing use any electrical equipment which only had a CE marking

Yes, Mr Wu can indeed self certify the stuff he has made in a lock up shed in Wuhan is 'CE certified' and put CE on it, no one even checks.
 
I thought the CE mark stood for Chinese Export. The Saudi oil firm I worked for would not let the residents of ccmpany housing use any electrical equipment which only had a CE marking
IRC The CE marking is put on in compliance with EU regulations where the goods comply with EU standards. The phrase Made in China is applicable And should be in any event “origin rules apply”. Given there is no way for the average punter to know on the face of it whether goods are counterfeit, I’d give the CE symbol about as much credence as , well, their enforcement ability. If in doubt contact your local trading standards, FACT or whatever the case may be.
 
IRC The CE marking is put on in compliance with EU regulations where the goods comply with EU standards. The phrase Made in China is applicable And should be in any event “origin rules apply”. Given there is no way for the average punter to know on the face of it whether goods are counterfeit, I’d give the CE symbol about as much credence as , well, their enforcement ability. If in doubt contact your local trading standards, FACT or whatever the case may be.
CE, Conformité Européene and Chinese Export:

 
IRC The CE marking is put on in compliance with EU regulations where the goods comply with EU standards. The phrase Made in China is applicable And should be in any event “origin rules apply”. Given there is no way for the average punter to know on the face of it whether goods are counterfeit, I’d give the CE symbol about as much credence as , well, their enforcement ability. If in doubt contact your local trading standards, FACT or whatever the case may be.

CE is pure farce.

Mr Wu can go onto an EU website and download a self certification form.
All he has to do is sign it and put it in a desk drawer at his garage.
There is not traceability or compliance assurance, none.
 
Fire away.

Why would I be concerned by the comments of a bona fide idiot on an internet forum? If you think for a moment that what you type has any significance beyond your own fertile imagination, then you're even more deluded that I had imagined.

PS, it's not my "significant other" who's "playing" with the "robot hoover".
<drift>
if you have a new, sometimes incontinent puppy, remember to cancel the robot hoover‘s overnight programme...
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