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What now for the EU ?

Truxx

LE
So the businesses are worrying over nothing?
In these sorts of things it is always worth checking what the NFU have to say



"NFU President Meurig Raymond said: “Farmers recognise that regulation is a part of farming like any other business but they are often left frustrated with rules that do not always make practical sense on farm.

“Leaving the EU provides a unique opportunity to develop a regulatory environment that is better designed and effectively implemented to allow farmers to do what they do best – provide a safe and affordable supply of British food.”

The NFU is calling for regulation that:

Increases the role of science and evidence
  • Respects realistic farm practices in its design
  • Takes account of good farming practice and membership of farm assurance schemes, and uses this earned recognition to reduce on-farm assessments
  • Better recognises the impacts of rules on business costs and operation
  • Includes a more balanced application of the Precautionary Principle
  • Is proportional, taking into account the size of businesses
Mr Raymond added: “The NFU has long maintained that any regulation should be scientifically evidenced, it should be implemented with minimal bureaucracy, and its impact on business should be fully assessed.

“Britain’s withdrawal from the EU provides the opportunity for the UK government to embrace these positive principles, improving the competitiveness of British farm businesses while ensuring continued access for our great British produce into overseas markets.

“However, to reach this point it is crucial the government ensures the EU Withdrawal Bill provides certainty to farmers about the rules and regulation they will be subject to in the short and medium term, so that their businesses can thrive without considerable disruption after we leave the EU.

“A system that offers farmers the best business environment to farm not only benefits food production but the countryside and rural economy as a whole.”
 

This short set of tweets deals with a "deeply unsexy" subject to do with licensing of chemicals. I'm vaguely aware of it through former colleagues.

It looks like exactly the sort of thing remainers were uneasy about.

Have any Brexitty people got an alternative take? I suspect the journalist is a bit of a pro-remainificationist.
So it works like this. Each country has its own part in the system. This means we already know how to do it. Just we don’t afford the existing back handers. Now this can work both ways. Either the EU recognises our licensing system or it doesn’t. Importers to us will either have to accept or bite the bullet and expect extra cost to licence it here and /or vice versa. Investors on either side don’t like extra cost.
 
So it works like this. Each country has its own part in the system. This means we already know how to do it. Just we don’t afford the existing back handers. Now this can work both ways. Either the EU recognises our licensing system or it doesn’t. Importers to us will either have to accept or bite the bullet and expect extra cost to licence it here and /or vice versa. Investors on either side don’t like extra cost.

It seems like a lot of money for not much gain, and also will hurt small businesses?
 
In these sorts of things it is always worth checking what the NFU have to say



"NFU President Meurig Raymond said: “Farmers recognise that regulation is a part of farming like any other business but they are often left frustrated with rules that do not always make practical sense on farm.

“Leaving the EU provides a unique opportunity to develop a regulatory environment that is better designed and effectively implemented to allow farmers to do what they do best – provide a safe and affordable supply of British food.”

The NFU is calling for regulation that:

Increases the role of science and evidence

Mr Raymond added: “The NFU has long maintained that any regulation should be scientifically evidenced, it should be implemented with minimal bureaucracy, and its impact on business should be fully assessed.

“Britain’s withdrawal from the EU provides the opportunity for the UK government to embrace these positive principles, improving the competitiveness of British farm businesses while ensuring continued access for our great British produce into overseas markets.

“However, to reach this point it is crucial the government ensures the EU Withdrawal Bill provides certainty to farmers about the rules and regulation they will be subject to in the short and medium term, so that their businesses can thrive without considerable disruption after we leave the EU.

“A system that offers farmers the best business environment to farm not only benefits food production but the countryside and rural economy as a whole.”


Seems the report/post was made several years ago - do you have anything current from them, about this situation? Although this REACH fiasco seems to extend beyond farmers, so not sure the opinions of Farmers should trump the opinion of other business voices in the UK.?
 
It's like you know your fantasy has gone tits up but you daren't admit it.

What about your fantasy of having a cake and arrse party?

cakeandarse.jpg
 

Grumblegrunt

LE
Book Reviewer

This short set of tweets deals with a "deeply unsexy" subject to do with licensing of chemicals. I'm vaguely aware of it through former colleagues.

It looks like exactly the sort of thing remainers were uneasy about.

Have any Brexitty people got an alternative take? I suspect the journalist is a bit of a pro-remainificationist.
been done, HMRC have teams of compliance officers making sure their customers have the requisite paperwork.
 

Grumblegrunt

LE
Book Reviewer
So it works like this. Each country has its own part in the system. This means we already know how to do it. Just we don’t afford the existing back handers. Now this can work both ways. Either the EU recognises our licensing system or it doesn’t. Importers to us will either have to accept or bite the bullet and expect extra cost to licence it here and /or vice versa. Investors on either side don’t like extra cost.

What about British chemical manufacturing, currently exporting to EU, and supply chains involving UK/EU crossbordering at multiple stages of manufacturing?

And, why are we creating a parallel licensing system anyway, when there's a perfectly good one in existence?
 
Seems the report/post was made several years ago - do you have anything current from them, about this situation? Although this REACH fiasco seems to extend beyond farmers, so not sure the opinions of Farmers should trump the opinion of other business voices in the UK.?

Farm chemicals are a small fraction of what is covered.
 

This short set of tweets deals with a "deeply unsexy" subject to do with licensing of chemicals. I'm vaguely aware of it through former colleagues.

It looks like exactly the sort of thing remainers were uneasy about.

Have any Brexitty people got an alternative take? I suspect the journalist is a bit of a pro-remainificationist.


REACH?

Public safety? My EU arse, it was regulatory legislation to shut out non EU manufacturers from teh EU market by stipulating insanely restrictive limits. Weedkillers that are so weak, they don't kill weeds, that sort of thing.

My pet hobby horse, reloading powders.

Muricans are for obvious reasons the big noise, but quell surprise! Most US powders fell foul of REACH and left only the EUromakers in the market.
 

Truxx

LE
only the ones too slack to do the right paperwork.
A point I have made repeatedly over the last couple of years.Many many businesses are already having to do non eu related regulatory stuff. So for them they already have the nous. I recall Bamford (JCB) saying exactly that.

plus businesses have now had nealy 4 years to sort themselves out, even if that is simply to codify processes, some(but not all) they might have to put in the "not sure yet" category.

the less they have in that category, in comparison to the totality of their portfolio, the better off they are.
 

Grumblegrunt

LE
Book Reviewer
It's not HMRC. They have nothing to do with it.
yes they do my ex missus was doing that as their customer compliance officer, part of her brief was to make sure they understood who to see and what to get. because trade equals taxes I guess.

one of her groups was CRODA who import raw chemicals used in pretty much everything.

she had one customer ring up because they had a ship stuck out at sea not allowed in because it didn't have the right paperwork for the chemicals it was carrying. she pointed out an email she had sent telling them to comply with the new regs by october or they would have problems

this was december I think.
 

Wordsmith

LE
Book Reviewer
In these sorts of things it is always worth checking what the NFU have to say



"NFU President Meurig Raymond said: “Farmers recognise that regulation is a part of farming like any other business but they are often left frustrated with rules that do not always make practical sense on farm.

“Leaving the EU provides a unique opportunity to develop a regulatory environment that is better designed and effectively implemented to allow farmers to do what they do best – provide a safe and affordable supply of British food.”

The NFU is calling for regulation that:

Increases the role of science and evidence

Mr Raymond added: “The NFU has long maintained that any regulation should be scientifically evidenced, it should be implemented with minimal bureaucracy, and its impact on business should be fully assessed.

“Britain’s withdrawal from the EU provides the opportunity for the UK government to embrace these positive principles, improving the competitiveness of British farm businesses while ensuring continued access for our great British produce into overseas markets.

“However, to reach this point it is crucial the government ensures the EU Withdrawal Bill provides certainty to farmers about the rules and regulation they will be subject to in the short and medium term, so that their businesses can thrive without considerable disruption after we leave the EU.

“A system that offers farmers the best business environment to farm not only benefits food production but the countryside and rural economy as a whole.”

Realistically the CAP is going to shut us out of the EU market after Brexit, but we should rely in reciprocal trade barriers stopping the EU dumping food into the UK market.

This is going to be all about efficiency. I suspect the big British farms are already fairly efficient; it's the small farms that are not. We might have to consider farming co-operatives where small forms share land and resources to improve overall all efficiency, profits being shared out accordingly.

We import a lot of our food. More efficient farming could mean we import less, improve our food security + improve our balance of payments. It would also help if the government invested money in a research/education program to bring down the use of fertilisers.

Food prices in the rest of the world are lower than in the EU, so we also need to improve the efficiency of our farming methods to compete.

There's a lot to do...

Wordsmith
 

Truxx

LE
Realistically the CAP is going to shut us out of the EU market after Brexit, but we should rely in reciprocal trade barriers stopping the EU dumping food into the UK market.

This is going to be all about efficiency. I suspect the big British farms are already fairly efficient; it's the small farms that are not. We might have to consider farming co-operatives where small forms share land and resources to improve overall all efficiency, profits being shared out accordingly.

We import a lot of our food. More efficient farming could mean we import less, improve our food security + improve our balance of payments. It would also help if the government invested money in a research/education program to bring down the use of fertilisers.

Food prices in the rest of the world are lower than in the EU, so we also need to improve the efficiency of our farming methods to compete.

There's a lot to do...

Wordsmith
pretty much what the NFU and others ha ve been saying for years.
 
Realistically the CAP is going to shut us out of the EU market after Brexit, but we should rely in reciprocal trade barriers stopping the EU dumping food into the UK market.

This is going to be all about efficiency. I suspect the big British farms are already fairly efficient; it's the small farms that are not. We might have to consider farming co-operatives where small forms share land and resources to improve overall all efficiency, profits being shared out accordingly.

We import a lot of our food. More efficient farming could mean we import less, improve our food security + improve our balance of payments. It would also help if the government invested money in a research/education program to bring down the use of fertilisers.

Food prices in the rest of the world are lower than in the EU, so we also need to improve the efficiency of our farming methods to compete.

There's a lot to do...

Wordsmith


Britains best farming land grows sugar beet.
Thats insane when you can get cheap cane sugar from abroad

Subsidies and tariffs create an insane situation
 
In these sorts of things it is always worth checking what the NFU have to say


"NFU President Meurig Raymond said: “Farmers recognise that regulation is a part of farming like any other business but they are often left frustrated with rules that do not always make practical sense on farm.

“Leaving the EU provides a unique opportunity to develop a regulatory environment that is better designed and effectively implemented to allow farmers to do what they do best – provide a safe and affordable supply of British food.”

The NFU is calling for regulation that:

Increases the role of science and evidence

Mr Raymond added: “The NFU has long maintained that any regulation should be scientifically evidenced, it should be implemented with minimal bureaucracy, and its impact on business should be fully assessed.

“Britain’s withdrawal from the EU provides the opportunity for the UK government to embrace these positive principles, improving the competitiveness of British farm businesses while ensuring continued access for our great British produce into overseas markets.

“However, to reach this point it is crucial the government ensures the EU Withdrawal Bill provides certainty to farmers about the rules and regulation they will be subject to in the short and medium term, so that their businesses can thrive without considerable disruption after we leave the EU.

“A system that offers farmers the best business environment to farm not only benefits food production but the countryside and rural economy as a whole.”
All well and good . . . as far as it goes.

However, it is suggested to gain "traction", support and sympathy, amongst the wider community, the NFU would be advised ( . . . REQUIRED . . . ), to add a couple of totemic words/phrases, that will resonate within that wider community, and (hopefully) confirm the whole-hearted commitment of the NFU and its members, to . . .

+ animal welfare.

+ sustainable practices.

+ environmental stewardship and protection.

“A system that offers farmers the best business environment to farm not only benefits food production but the countryside and rural economy as a whole” . . . just does NOT go far enough!! :( .
 
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Erm, yes. Try moving to another EU country without a job or the means to support yourself.
Germany you get three months and they send you home. Bill the country you are from for transport back
 

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