What now for the EU ?

We (by we I actually mean all of you vaccine thieving Brits living in the UK) will soon have a million and one big belly beer laughs when Szymon or Jakub cannot get on a ferry, aircraft or Eurotunnel without proof of vaccination.
To get home to the EU too, cheers Uschi.
Talking heads abroad in positions of government are quoting the same proof of vaccination about access to public transport, libraries and access to public spaces.
Fcuk knows how that will work or be enforced, but it is certainly going to be enforced at national borders and ports of entry, that is for sure.
At current rates of vaccination in France, I will start packing my valises in June 2023 ready for my first trip abroad in 2024, at the latest by that summer I hope.
Wish me luck !
It's going to be hilarious when the only people allowed on French and German public transport are Brits, cheerily waving their vaccination papers.
 
It's going to be hilarious when the only people allowed on French and German public transport are Brits, cheerily waving their vaccination papers.
We had the gardeners in today to get rid of all the autumn leaves. While my wife was chatting with them a few old tropes cropped up. "Yeah, those crazy Brits, they really like to party." "Those Brits, they don't like it when we get up early and put our towels on the sunloungers." My wife really couldn't help herself with, "But that won't be a problem this year will it?"
 
So does that mean tariffs now apply to Uk
Not according to this. Carry on normal jogging by the look of things.

So far, UK has inked post-Brexit trade deals with 13 African countries. But these new agreements, which offer duty-free and quota-free access to British markets, aren't much different to the old ones. That's because they are primarily so-called rollover agreements — that is, they simply transfer the conditions in the EU deals into bilateral agreements between the UK and the African nation, or blocs.
 

Joker62

ADC
Book Reviewer
We (by we I actually mean all of you vaccine thieving Brits living in the UK) will soon have a million and one big belly beer laughs when Szymon or Jakub cannot get on a ferry, aircraft or Eurotunnel without proof of vaccination.
To get home to the EU too, cheers Uschi.
Talking heads abroad in positions of government are quoting the same proof of vaccination about access to public transport, libraries and access to public spaces.
Fcuk knows how that will work or be enforced, but it is certainly going to be enforced at national borders and ports of entry, that is for sure.
At current rates of vaccination in France, I will start packing my valises in June 2023 ready for my first trip abroad in 2024, at the latest by that summer I hope.
Wish me luck !
You're assuming tha copies of an offical vaccine blank haven't already hit the streets.
 
What, then, is the situation in treaty law? Does the EU have a case against the UK for actually breaking international law?

The point made was about implied "contracts", which don't exist under "international law", but exist in various forms in commercial contract law.

"Treaties" are only enforceable upon ratification by all parties to that treaty, usually with reference to a specific date. An "agreement", however, such as the Withdrawal Agreement, generally enters into force when the conditions precedent within that specific Agreement are met, which may or may not include ratification. Breaches and remedies thereof will, therefore, be a function of what's written in the Agreement.
 

Dread

LE
What, then, is the situation in treaty law? Does the EU have a case against the UK for actually breaking international law?

There is no such thing as "international law". It is very much a case of 'might is right' in most situations.

Treaties need to be obeyed, up to the point they don't: the The Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties then applies. While lawyers who make a lot of money out of that field will be outraged at my simplistic take, treaties signed (willingly) by a country need to be followed until that country decides that the treaty is no longer in its best interest, whereupon the country needs to formally break the treaty.

Breaking the terms of a treaty while claiming to observe it is a no-no (though many countries pay lip-service to this).

There is no 'Supreme Court' for nations: there is (at the moment) only the Security Council of the UN. Everything else, including all the wibbling shite that passes for the UN General Assembly, can be safely ignored. The rest is politics (including the application of WTO tariffs, etc.).
 
What I am saying is that over fishing of Somalian waters by EU factory fishing boats forced Somali fishermen to seek an alternative source of income. Piracy.
er no. What forced the Somalians into piracy was the opportunity of a payday bigger than most could remember, certainly for the Gang/ tribal leaders. And that means arms and clout. Sometimes the changes come, not just as a result of economic down turns.
 
Maybe all those weirdo "Luftwaffe 46" fanboys can at long last find out whether a Geschwader of upgraded ME262 fighters can destroy the whole of the RAF and USAAF in an afternoon...
well to TBF they did rather more than the Ffffrench, or maybe the EU will come up with a pack of lies that it was in fact the French air force that drove them back-which could be rather confusing for the EU.
 
... There is no 'Supreme Court' for nations: there is (at the moment) only the Security Council of the UN. Everything else, including all the wibbling shite that passes for the UN General Assembly, can be safely ignored. The rest is politics (including the application of WTO tariffs, etc.).
A point made on 1 Oct 2020 and over 1,000 pp ago (according to my phone pagination) in this very thread, when discussing the EU’s threat to take legal action against the UK over the, then putative, IMB.
The only available legal forum is the ICJ, and enforcement of any decision is devolved to the Security Council.
The EU, qua EU, is not, and can not be, a member of the Council because it only has ‘enhanced observer’ status and a legal personality equivalent to thee and me. In that respect, the EU can not bring a case in the ICJ, only a sovereign state and full UN member can do so.
In any case, even if the EU does somehow finesse a case (very doubtful), and the Court found against the UK, enforcement is down to the Security Council where the EU is not a member and the UK has a veto.
As you say, a toothless threat, and the UK Govt knows it.
 
er no. What forced the Somalians into piracy was the opportunity of a payday bigger than most could remember, certainly for the Gang/ tribal leaders. And that means arms and clout. Sometimes the changes come, not just as a result of economic down turns.

er no, EU trawlers collapsed the local fishing industry.

unemployed fishermen + boats + passing EUropean ships = new employment opportunity
 

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