What now for the EU ?

Perhaps this why the UK could not give a monkeys about the EU's Galileo sat-nav system.




I foresee foreign fishing fleets having to sign up for a platinum package before being allowed a fishing licence :D :D
We have paid a far chunk of the dosh.

I know it's old

 
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Especially since a Greenpeace investigation found that Factory fishing boats have spent 3000 hours in the U.K. protected fishing areas presumably agreed under CFP and as a result there have been spikes in Dolphin deaths. Those ships need seizing sinking forth with.
Fixed, FoC
 
Especially since a Greenpeace investigation found that Factory fishing boats have spent 3000 hours in the U.K. protected fishing areas presumably agreed under CFP and as a result there have been spikes in Dolphin deaths. Those ships need seizing fort with.
It should have happened a long time ago. I left school over 60 years ago. I still remember a geography teacher telling us the sea was a bottomless food source. That turned out well. And as for the quota system...absolutely crazy.
 
Fixed, FoC
No no seizing. Becomes property of the crown. Major inconvenience because the fleet looses an asset which it has to either buy back (which has major ramification for profitability), or lose the vessel totally and the Insurance is unlikely to pay up as it’s unlawful activity plus the catch is ours and damned good publicity for exceeded quotas. Sink the vessel and you lose the evidence. Minimum for release would be three times the value of the ship. Think of it in Prize money.
 
No no seizing. Becomes property of the crown. Major inconvenience because the fleet looses an asset which it has to either buy back (which has major ramification for profitability), or lose the vessel totally and the Insurance is unlikely to pay up as it’s unlawful activity plus the catch is ours and damned good publicity for exceeded quotas. Sink the vessel and you lose the evidence. Minimum for release would be three times the value of the ship. Think of it in Prize money.
Nelson never.explained it to me that way, I just thought we sunk furriners.
 
Nelson never.explained it to me that way, I just thought we sunk furriners.
Funnily enough in Nelson’s time, that was the last resort. Normally they resorted to prize money cos that’s how the crews got their extras, occifers in particular. Cannon balls through the rigging job jobbed a bit different to lobbing fifteen inchers Onto bespoke tin cans. War is truly economic.
 
For whatever reason the migration of EU based companies to the UK may be continuing ....

AMSTERDAM (Reuters) - Royal Dutch Shell (RDSa.L) is not ruling out moving its headquarters from the Netherlands to Britain, the oil company’s chief executive Ben van Beurden said in a Dutch newspaper interview published on Saturday.
... full article linky ... Shell CEO does not rule out moving headquarters to Britain
 
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Tyk

LE
For whatever reason the migration of EU based companies to the UK may be continuing ....



... full article linky ... Shell CEO does not rule out moving headquarters to Britain
Which is interesting as many people expected companies to move HQ's and major facilities from the UK to EU countries, in fact it was a large element of Project Fear.
I think it's fair to assume that they smell the chance of being subject to a friendlier trading regime than in EU central.
 
Which is interesting as many people expected companies to move HQ's and major facilities from the UK to EU countries, in fact it was a large element of Project Fear.
I think it's fair to assume that they smell the chance of being subject to a friendlier trading regime than in EU central.
Indeed and hopefully the grass will be seen to be greener on our side of The Channel by more Companies thus damning the dire predictions of the doom mongers .
 

Grumblegrunt

LE
Book Reviewer
It should have happened a long time ago. I left school over 60 years ago. I still remember a geography teacher telling us the sea was a bottomless food source. That turned out well. And as for the quota system...absolutely crazy.
Interesting when they knew that the only thing that saved North sea fish stocks from total collapse twice was the two wars and huge minefields out there. It's why many of us think we need to stop EU boats altogether and give the seas a rest while we rebuild our own infrastructure where required after the few boats we have left get used to being able catch what they want and as much as they want. Five years is about right.

Sent from my moto g(7) power using Tapatalk
 
Interesting when they knew that the only thing that saved North sea fish stocks from total collapse twice was the two wars and huge minefields out there. It's why many of us think we need to stop EU boats altogether and give the seas a rest while we rebuild our own infrastructure where required after the few boats we have left get used to being able catch what they want and as much as they want. Five years is about right.

Sent from my moto g(7) power using Tapatalk
Fully agree. Let the stocks recuperate, ban ALL those factory ships, then local fishermen can use their smaller boats once the fish are abundant again.
 
Fully agree. Let the stocks recuperate, ban ALL those factory ships, then local fishermen can use their smaller boats once the fish are abundant again.
I thought the idea was a grid system. No fishing in every other square of the grid. This means that overflow from that area fills up the others?

Of course, you'd need to be watching like a hawk for the inevitable fisherman who does fish in there to get a bumper crop.
 

ancienturion

LE
Book Reviewer
Of course, you'd need to be watching like a hawk for the inevitable fisherman who does fish in there to get a bumper crop.
If only we had sufficient Navy vessels, or Fishing Protection vessels or Border Force vessels (actually the BF would be too busy escorting illegal immigrants)
 
If only we had sufficient Navy vessels, or Fishing Protection vessels or Border Force vessels (actually the BF would be too busy escorting illegal immigrants)
I would have expected an increase this year for patrol vessels, or rather, if I was in charge I would have looked at it.

Of course if you want to get interesting, you could use technology to do it. Small underwater drones, size of a fish which bimble about in the safe zones. If it's brought to the surface it transmits its GPS location. If said location coincides with radar returns for a ship, and is inside a protected zone guess whose getting a visit from the Sea Rozers.
 

Truxx

LE
I thought the idea was a grid system. No fishing in every other square of the grid. This means that overflow from that area fills up the others?

Of course, you'd need to be watching like a hawk for the inevitable fisherman who does fish in there to get a bumper crop.
Transponders made mandatory?

See also

 
I would have expected an increase this year for patrol vessels, or rather, if I was in charge I would have looked at it . . . .
Published by: George Allison, UK DEFENCE JOURNAL, on 02 July 2020.

HMS Severn operational again years after decommissioning.

HMS Severn has returned to operational status after her crew completed the three-week Operational Sea Training assessment, say the Royal Navy.

The River class Offshore Patrol Vessel left the fleet in October 2017 after 14 years of service.

The vessel was originally decommissioned in October 2017 as previously the plan was to replace the Batch 1 River class Offshore Patrol Vessels with the newer Batch 2 vessels. However, it was announced in 2018 that all vessels will be retained.

A&P Defence recently delivered the reactivation refit of HMS Severn as part of an ongoing support contract with BAE Systems.

According to a Royal Navy news release:

“Offshore patrol vessels operating in the UK use a system of crew rotation which means they spend four weeks on the ship, then two on shore, with about a third making the switch at any time. With the “off watch” in isolation at home while the rest of the crew are at sea it has meant a succession of seamless transitions for the crew during the Covid-19 outbreak – vital for a class of ship which aims to achieve 320 days at sea per year.

It is a return to operations for HMS Severn for the first time since late 2017 when she was decommissioned. However, she was later deemed too important to UK defence to be disposed of; the Secretary of State in November 2018 announced that she would return to the Fleet. Since a return to sea on April 1 she has already added nearly 5,000 miles to the log with 10% of her crew coming from the Royal Naval Reserve; common practice among offshore patrol vessels to give reservists a fixed-term spell serving full-time within UK waters.”


HMS Severn will also have an important role to play training Royal Navy navigators, who will join the ship for testing pilotage off the west coast of Scotland and English Channel, say the Royal Navy.

1593952030989.png


 
I would have expected an increase this year for patrol vessels, or rather, if I was in charge I would have looked at it . . . .
Published by: the RN, on 03 July 2020.

Royal Navy's Magnificent Seven set for summer deployment

Seven Archer Class P2000 Patrol Boats are preparing to ride North for the Summer where they will spend a fortnight sailing around Scotland’s coastline, providing an opportunity for important Operational Training for their crews.


The seven ships – HMS Biter, HMS Charger, HMS Express, HMS Trumpeter, HMS Archer, HMS Explorer and HMS Example – all support University Royal Naval Units (URNU) and can reach the parts that other navy ships can’t reach.

At just over 20 meters long they are some of the smallest vessels in the Fleet, giving them the ability to sail to some of the smaller Scottish harbours.

Captain Chris Smith, Naval Regional Commander for Scotland and Northern Ireland said: “It is great to be able to bring the Royal Navy near to some of our smaller communities which, because of harbour size, don’t usually get a visit from our ships.

“The P2000s may be small, but they pack a punch, and regularly exercise around the UK and Europe as well as supporting the Fleet.”

He continued: “Usually we would be hosting visits from local groups and organisations while alongside but, with the current situation, this is unfortunately not possible.

"We hope to engage with local organisations across social media and using new technologies, and if people spot them in their area do give them a wave!”

The Summer deployment will provide the crews of the seven vessels with a unique opportunity to practice seamanship and navigation skills.

Each ship has a core crew of full-time Royal Navy sailors which in normal times would be augmented by members of the University Royal Naval Units.

While this is not possible this time due to the current restrictions, each vessel will use new technologies to have a weekly virtual drill night with their associated URNU.

The Royal Navy has 14 Fast Inshore Patrol Craft which together form the First Patrol Boat Squadron.

Although their primary role is to support the URNUs, they also contribute to a wide range of Fleet Tasking. Two of them, HMS Tracker and HMS Raider, are permanently based at HMNB Clyde where they are part of the team safeguarding the nuclear fleet.

Beginning July 4th, four of the ships – Trumpeter, Archer, Explorer and Example - will sail up the East Coast of Scotland, while Biter, Charger and Express will follow the West Coast route.

Harbour stops along the way include: Leith, Peterhead, Wick, Westray, Stromness, Inverness, Fraserburgh, Port Ellen, Oban, Fort William, Kyle of Lochalsh, Ullapoool, Stornoway, Loch Boisdale and Tobermory.

20200626-Archer Class P2000-stock image.jpg


 

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