What now for the EU ?

Truxx

LE
The latest talks have ended early and with a fair bit of acrimony :D :D

Fishing is posing serious issues for Barnier / the EU.




1. No, there doesn't need to be. You might like there to be one, which is something totally different.

2. Why should the UK take into consideration European Fishermen ?

3. ECJ in mind ?

Back to the drawing board Barnier - You are fast running out of time.
I watched an interesting prog about the rise in "populist" parties in Europe. The Dutch and French ones are strongly rooted in coastal fishing areas.

This ain't about the fish....
 
@ancienturion
You've twice down voted my above posts from last night. If you don't agree, fine, but please have the good manners to tell me why. I expect head dobbing from the usual goons but not your good self.
Are you suggesting that I am wrong and that Parliament is required to vote in a 'No deal' Exit from the EU?
 

ancienturion

LE
Book Reviewer
I watched an interesting prog about the rise in "populist" parties in Europe. The Dutch and French ones are strongly rooted in coastal fishing areas.
Perhaps the Dutch and French could go back to their own coastal fishing areas. Anyway, what happened before the European Union?





This ain't about the fish....
Off thread I know but that reminds me of The Hitchhikers Guide To The Galaxy.
 

Grownup_Rafbrat

LE
Book Reviewer
So long, you'll now pay for all our fish?
 
The irony is strong on this one.

I wont labour the point about Germany's current battle with the ECB over acting outwith it's remit.

The €750 billion bailout fund, apparently requires the EIB to act outwith it's remit also. According to the head of the EIB in an article published in Politico ( I might have previously posted the article, or it can be dug out )




Not the original article that I read, however, the scope of the EIB's involvement takes it outwith the Banks lending rules. There was also something about buying bonds that was also problematic for the EIB.
Either way it is argued last night that the EU must sort out it's financial agreements in short order, like the next Month- not that these things can't be kicked down the road. Of course the other way is for the commission to carry on payments in the short medium term and ignore the national legal issues, until it needs funds again.
 

BuggerAll

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Either way it is argued last night that the EU must sort out it's financial agreements in short order, like the next Month- not that these things can't be kicked down the road. Of course the other way is for the commission to carry on payments in the short medium term and ignore the national legal issues, until it needs funds again.
They won’t be getting funds from us. Therefore it is of no importance at all.

Perhaps BoJo should ask for our share of the EIB to be repatriated.
 
Perhaps BoJo should ask for our share of the EIB to be repatriated.
...or..... I would say Bob and None. It may not get funds centrally from us but the EIB can get funds where it chooses afaik. There's going to be loads of writing off or writing down in the foreseeable future. They do owe us our share for the building of the Parliaments etc.... one of which is falling down.
 
Perhaps this why the UK could not give a monkeys about the EU's Galileo sat-nav system.

A consortium involving India's Bharti Global and the UK government was the highest bidder in an auction for the failed satellite company OneWeb.

Ministers' interest is said to be driven by two factors. One is that they see satellites as a way to meet commitments on the roll-out of super-fast broadband; and the second is that OneWeb's constellation could also deliver a precise Positioning, Navigation and Timing (PNT) service.

I foresee foreign fishing fleets having to sign up for a platinum package before being allowed a fishing licence :D :D
 
...or..... I would say Bob and None. It may not get funds centrally from us but the EIB can get funds where it chooses afaik. There's going to be loads of writing off or writing down in the foreseeable future. They do owe us our share for the building of the Parliaments etc.... one of which is falling down.
. . . and our contribution to enable them to build all their "Foreign Embassies" ?!
 

Grownup_Rafbrat

LE
Book Reviewer
Another snippet learned today when undergoing my annual eye test. A few years ago optical lens tolerances were switched from UK to EU standards. The range of accuracy was thus broadened, meaning your specs don't actually have to meet your prescription by quite a wide margin.

Optician lady has 30 years' experience in the industry and was quite narked by this, being very myopic.

So, like fuel, where we changed from the UK standard that you had to receive at least as much as the reading on the pump, but the EU allows plus or minus 10%, so modern electronic pumps dispense 90% of what they display, the EU seems to be designed to sell its citizens short measure.
 
Another snippet learned today when undergoing my annual eye test. A few years ago optical lens tolerances were switched from UK to EU standards. The range of accuracy was thus broadened, meaning your specs don't actually have to meet your prescription by quite a wide margin.

Optician lady has 30 years' experience in the industry and was quite narked by this, being very myopic.

So, like fuel, where we changed from the UK standard that you had to receive at least as much as the reading on the pump, but the EU allows plus or minus 10%, so modern electronic pumps dispense 90% of what they display, the EU seems to be designed to sell its citizens short measure.
How was Barnard Castle ?! ;)
 
So, like fuel, where we changed from the UK standard that you had to receive at least as much as the reading on the pump, but the EU allows plus or minus 10%, so modern electronic pumps dispense 90% of what they display, the EU seems to be designed to sell its citizens short measure.
As far as I am aware, a fuel pump has to calibrated such that the margin of error is no more than 0.5% short measured and no more than 1% over delivered.

A quick goggle turns up this from Hampshire Trading Standards...

Pump Accuracy

How do you know you are receiving the correct amount of fuel?
When a pump is installed, it is tested to check that it delivers the correct amount of fuel. When officers check equipment they make sure the measures are within legal tolerances (that is between - 0.5% and + 1%)​
The pumps are ‘sealed’ to ensure they cannot be tampered with. Each time any maintenance is carried out or parts need replacing, the testing procedure is carried out again. We also carry out unannounced checks.​
The quantity delivered must be within legally defined tolerances.​

At a 10% margin you’d be getting 90 litres for the price of 100. Could you really imagine that being acceptable? The Daily Mail Outrage would be measurable on the Richter Scale.
 
Another snippet learned today when undergoing my annual eye test. A few years ago optical lens tolerances were switched from UK to EU standards. The range of accuracy was thus broadened, meaning your specs don't actually have to meet your prescription by quite a wide margin.

Optician lady has 30 years' experience in the industry and was quite narked by this, being very myopic.

So, like fuel, where we changed from the UK standard that you had to receive at least as much as the reading on the pump, but the EU allows plus or minus 10%, so modern electronic pumps dispense 90% of what they display, the EU seems to be designed to sell its citizens short measure.
Do you just sit there and make things up? Tolerances at petrol pumps are between -0.5% and +1%. not 10%.
And before the EU directive, UK also had an allowable error plus or minus when measuring amount dispensed at 15C.

No idea about optical tolerances but suspect that's probably crap too because they have to conform to BS EN ISO 8624: 2011 updated 2015 for lenses and BS 3521 -1: 1991 for frames.
 

Truxx

LE
Perhaps the Dutch and French could go back to their own coastal fishing areas. Anyway, what happened before the European Union?







Off thread I know but that reminds me of The Hitchhikers Guide To The Galaxy.
The greatest area of euroskeptisism in Holland, for instance, is amongst fisher folks. Although Geert Wilders is somewhat back in his box my money is on the EU in general and the cloggie political establishment in particular wanting it to stay that way. The last thing they want is some cause celebre to rally "right wing" support around.

Same detail in UK; fishing itself maybe a minnow in the overall economy, but has been said a million times on this and other threads, the leave vote was not an economic one, rather UK being able to exercise sovereignty over UK issues. Thus fishing has a powerful totemic message.
 

Truxx

LE
Another snippet learned today when undergoing my annual eye test. A few years ago optical lens tolerances were switched from UK to EU standards. The range of accuracy was thus broadened, meaning your specs don't actually have to meet your prescription by quite a wide margin.

Optician lady has 30 years' experience in the industry and was quite narked by this, being very myopic.

So, like fuel, where we changed from the UK standard that you had to receive at least as much as the reading on the pump, but the EU allows plus or minus 10%, so modern electronic pumps dispense 90% of what they display, the EU seems to be designed to sell its citizens short measure.
Odd I know but see also paint mixing,

The shift from BS to RAL codes means that now, your specially mixed, say automotive paint needs only to be within 10% of what it should be.

Red is particularly problematic.
 

Grownup_Rafbrat

LE
Book Reviewer

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