What now for the EU ?

Wordsmith

LE
Book Reviewer
Many posts ago I commented on a politician who had been involved in the preliminary negotiations. I think it was David Davis. He was interviewed on Radio 5, I think sometime not long after the referendum result. In that interview he stated that in all previous negotiations with the EU, they (the negotiations) had gone down to the wire, in some cases to the very last minute. He said that he would not be surprised if that was the case in the Brexit deal.
The practical problem the EU has is that BoJo will not accept anything that ties the UK to EU rules. And BoJo is quite happy to trade with the EU on WTO terms. Finally, BoJo has the votes to get a no-deal Brexit through parliament.

The EU now has two options:
  • Do nothing and watch BoJo happily exit on WTO terms, blaming the EU for it's intransigence.
  • Do a massive climb down and offer a deal that will leave the UK better off than WTO terms
I doubt either option is palatable to Brussels, so now they have to chose the lesser of the two evils.

And let's not forget why the EU is so keen to hamstring Britain. They can't afford a UK binning EU rules and cutting taxes below EU levels and then prospering. The calls for the EU to do the same would become clamorous - and then bye-bye United States of Europe

That then leaves the EU with a royally fornicated single currency and no way to fix it.

Oh, how the EU must curse BoJo.

Wordsmith
 

Brotherton Lad

LE
Kit Reviewer
The practical problem the EU has is that BoJo will not accept anything that ties the UK to EU rules. And BoJo is quite happy to trade with the EU on WTO terms. Finally, BoJo has the votes to get a no-deal Brexit through parliament.

The EU now has two options:
  • Do nothing and watch BoJo happily exit on WTO terms, blaming the EU for it's intransigence.
  • Do a massive climb down and offer a deal that will leave the UK better off than WTO terms
I doubt either option is palatable to Brussels, so now they have to chose the lesser of the two evils.

And let's not forget why the EU is so keen to hamstring Britain. They can't afford a UK binning EU rules and cutting taxes below EU levels and then prospering. The calls for the EU to do the same would become clamorous - and then bye-bye United States of Europe

That then leaves the EU with a royally fornicated single currency and no way to fix it.

Oh, how the EU must curse BoJo.

Wordsmith
Have you considered deploying a couple of three word slogans in order to rally the troops?
 
The practical problem the EU has is that BoJo will not accept anything that ties the UK to EU rules. And BoJo is quite happy to trade with the EU on WTO terms. Finally, BoJo has the votes to get a no-deal Brexit through parliament.

The EU now has two options:
  • Do nothing and watch BoJo happily exit on WTO terms, blaming the EU for it's intransigence.
  • Do a massive climb down and offer a deal that will leave the UK better off than WTO terms
I doubt either option is palatable to Brussels, so now they have to chose the lesser of the two evils.

And let's not forget why the EU is so keen to hamstring Britain. They can't afford a UK binning EU rules and cutting taxes below EU levels and then prospering. The calls for the EU to do the same would become clamorous - and then bye-bye United States of Europe

That then leaves the EU with a royally fornicated single currency and no way to fix it.

Oh, how the EU must curse BoJo.

Wordsmith
When did this become a matter for Parliament to vote on again?

"Finally, BoJo has the votes to get a no-deal Brexit through parliament."

It is already a matter enshrined in law that if no deal occurs, then no further vote by Westminster is required. Unless you know different.
 

Wordsmith

LE
Book Reviewer
When did this become a matter for Parliament to vote on again?

"Finally, BoJo has the votes to get a no-deal Brexit through parliament."

It is already a matter enshrined in law that if no deal occurs, then no further vote by Westminster is required. Unless you know different.
Theoretically, a motion could be put to parliament overturning BoJo's Brexit law - think back to the days of May and all the Brexit wrecking amendments that were put to parliament with the connivance of that utterly non-partisan dwarf Bercow.

But no actual attempt will be made because of the size of BoJo's majority - were it 5 or so, I'd bet the attempt would have been made.

Wordsmith
 
Theoretically, a motion could be put to parliament overturning BoJo's Brexit law - think back to the days of May and all the Brexit wrecking amendments that were put to parliament with the connivance of that utterly non-partisan dwarf Bercow.

But no actual attempt will be made because of the size of BoJo's majority - were it 5 or so, I'd bet the attempt would have been made.

Wordsmith
Stop digging.
You said" Finally, BoJo has the votes to get a no-deal Brexit through parliament. ", implying that there would be a vote required to be put before parliament to vote whether to accept a no deal Brexit or otherwise.
No parliamentary vote is required, scheduled or otherwise.
 

Brotherton Lad

LE
Kit Reviewer
Stop digging.
You said" Finally, BoJo has the votes to get a no-deal Brexit through parliament. ", implying that there would be a vote required to be put before parliament to vote whether to accept a no deal Brexit or otherwise.
No parliamentary vote is required, scheduled or otherwise.
That's what Parliament does. It can change the law.
 

Oops

War Hero
When did this become a matter for Parliament to vote on again?

"Finally, BoJo has the votes to get a no-deal Brexit through parliament."

It is already a matter enshrined in law that if no deal occurs, then no further vote by Westminster is required. Unless you know different.
And they're to be trusted even though they're 80odd seats behind the latest democratic consensus?

As untrustworthy as most Parliamentarians are, you can bet your last euro the Ramainerati are still planning and scheming against HMG, to halt a New Years' Unshackling.

They've not gone away you know.
 
That's what Parliament does. It can change the law.
It is a good job you’re here Colonel... who'd have known that rather obscure little snippet about what Parliament does?

Currently though, Parliament can only change the law if the party of government with its 80 seat majority says it can. May I suggest that you don’t build your hopes up for an eleventh hour cancellation of Brexit. Nobody wants your salty tears of disappointment dripping into their soup.
 
It is a good job you’re here Colonel... who'd have known that rather obscure little snippet about what Parliament does?

Currently though, Parliament can only change the law if the party of government with its 80 seat majority says it can. May I suggest that you don’t build your hopes up for an eleventh hour cancellation of Brexit. Nobody wants your salty tears of disappointment dripping into their soup.
Cough, I do
 
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The practical problem the EU has is that BoJo will not accept anything that ties the UK to EU rules. And BoJo is quite happy to trade with the EU on WTO terms. Finally, BoJo has the votes to get a no-deal Brexit through parliament.

The EU now has two options:
  • Do nothing and watch BoJo happily exit on WTO terms, blaming the EU for it's intransigence.
  • Do a massive climb down and offer a deal that will leave the UK better off than WTO terms
I doubt either option is palatable to Brussels, so now they have to chose the lesser of the two evils.

And let's not forget why the EU is so keen to hamstring Britain. They can't afford a UK binning EU rules and cutting taxes below EU levels and then prospering. The calls for the EU to do the same would become clamorous - and then bye-bye United States of Europe

That then leaves the EU with a royally fornicated single currency and no way to fix it.

Oh, how the EU must curse BoJo.

Wordsmith
According to Euronews tonight, it seems Germany has relegated the importance of a trade deal to secondary importance. The most important for Van D L and Merkel is shaping a 750 Bn recovery plan, emphasis on the “Frugal four” and Macron Pushing. Merkel is doing the EU in a fortnight and VDL is in German mode. Sounds like a sea change.
 
The latest talks have ended early and with a fair bit of acrimony :D :D

Fishing is posing serious issues for Barnier / the EU.

He further said in his statement there needed to be a ( 1 )“sustainable and long-term solution” on fisheries, taking into account the ( 2 ) needs of European fishermen for certainty over their livelihoods and an ( 3 effective all-encompassing dispute settlement mechanism to ensure both sides stick to their obligations.

1. No, there doesn't need to be. You might like there to be one, which is something totally different.

2. Why should the UK take into consideration European Fishermen ?

3. ECJ in mind ?

Back to the drawing board Barnier - You are fast running out of time.
 
According to Euronews tonight, it seems Germany has relegated the importance of a trade deal to secondary importance. The most important for Van D L and Merkel is shaping a 750 Bn recovery plan, emphasis on the “Frugal four” and Macron Pushing. Merkel is doing the EU in a fortnight and VDL is in German mode. Sounds like a sea change.
The irony is strong on this one.

I wont labour the point about Germany's current battle with the ECB over acting outwith it's remit.

The €750 billion bailout fund, apparently requires the EIB to act outwith it's remit also. According to the head of the EIB in an article published in Politico ( I might have previously posted the article, or it can be dug out )

The European Investment Bank said it needs more capital and employees to carry out the European Commission’s multibillion-euro recovery plans to overcome the pandemic’s economic fallout.

Not the original article that I read, however, the scope of the EIB's involvement takes it outwith the Banks lending rules. There was also something about buying bonds that was also problematic for the EIB.
 

BuggerAll

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
The irony is strong on this one.

I wont labour the point about Germany's current battle with the ECB over acting outwith it's remit.

The €750 billion bailout fund, apparently requires the EIB to act outwith it's remit also. According to the head of the EIB in an article published in Politico ( I might have previously posted the article, or it can be dug out )




Not the original article that I read, however, the scope of the EIB's involvement takes it outwith the Banks lending rules. There was also something about buying bonds that was also problematic for the EIB.
The EU is a very rules based institution and cannot possibly break its own rules; at least so we are told when it comes to things like applying those rules to the UK. Those rules don’t seem to apply quite so much when they apply to anything else.

We’re well out of it.
 
Have you considered deploying a couple of three word slogans in order to rally the troops?
Bollocks To Brexit?

Better Together?

We Already Have The Best Deal?

ETA the evergreen favourite:

Brexit Will Die This Winter. 2016 2017 2018 2019

Oh, how we laughed.
 
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