What name now! Rifleman or Them Rifles.

in my 10+ years working in Whitehall at senior cross departmental levels I have never, ever heard Latin spoken.
Ah! . . . but (to quote Terry Scott), you don't know what they're thinking !! ;) .
 

Bubbles_Barker

LE
Book Reviewer
Ah! . . . but (to quote Terry Scott), you don't know what they're thinking !! ;) .
Believe me - there's very little thinking goes on!
 
Ubique is also the motto of the Royal Artillery although in their case it takes a different meaning. Not “Everywhere“ but “All over the fücking place”
There’s also ‘Quo Fas et Gloria Ducunt’ - ‘What are you and Gloria doing you Cnut’.
Edit: A very loose translation!
 
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Ubique is also the motto of the Royal Artillery although in their case it takes a different meaning. Not “Everywhere“ but “All over the fücking place”
THERE is a word you often see, pronounce it as you may
“You bike,” “you bykwee,” “ubbikwe “ - alludin’ to R.A.

It serves ’Orse, Field, an’ Garrison as motto for a crest,
An’ when you’ve found out all it means I’ll tell you ’alf the rest.

Ubique means the long-range Krupp be’ind the low-range ’ill -
Ubique means you’ll pick it up an’, while you do, stand still.

Ubique means you’ve caught the flash an’ timed it by the sound.
Ubique means five gunners’ ’ash before you’ve loosed a round.

Ubique means Blue Fuse an’ make the ’ole to sink the trail.
Ubique means stand up an’ take the Mauser’s ’alf-mile ’ail.

Ubique means the crazy team not God nor man can ’old.
Ubique means that ’orse’s scream which turns your innards cold!

Ubique means “Bank, ’Olborn, Bank - a penny all the way -
The soothin’, jingle-bump-an’-clank from day to peaceful day.

Ubique means “They’ve caught De Wet, an’ now we sha’n t be long.”
Ubique means “I much regret, the beggar’s goin’ strong!”

Ubique means the tearin’ drift where, breech-blocks jammed with mud,
The khaki muzzles duck an’ lift across the khaki flood.

Ubique means the dancing plain that changes rocks to Boers.
Ubique means the mirage again an’ shellin’ all outdoors.

Ubique means “Entrain at once for Grootdefeatfontein”!
Ubique means “Off-load your guns” -at midnight in the rain!

Ubique means “More mounted men. Return all guns to store.”
Ubique means the R. A. M. R. Infantillery Corps!

Ubique means that warnin’ grunt the perished linesman knows,
When o’er ’is strung an’ sufferin’ front the shrapnel sprays ’is foes;

An’ as their firin’ dies away the ’usky whisper runs
From lips that ’ave n’t drunk all day: “The Guns! Thank Gawd, the Guns!”

Extreme, depressed, point-blank or short, end-first or any’ow,
From Colesberg Kop to Quagga’s Poort - from Ninety-Nine till now -

By what I’ve ’eard the others tell an’ I in spots ’ave seen,
There’s nothin’ this side ’Eaven or ’Ell Ubique doesn’t mean!


Rudyard Kipling
 

Bubbles_Barker

LE
Book Reviewer
That is not, was not, the RCT motto :( .
In which case, both the RCT and RASC had two mottos...

Or three between them!
 

Bubbles_Barker

LE
Book Reviewer
In which case, both the RCT and RASC had two mottos...

Or three between them!
"Nil sine labore", is totally new to me !!

As a very new 2Lt (fifty years ago . . . ), I was told by my Adjutant, that the Corps motto was,

"honi soi qui mal y pense", ("Evil be to him, who evil thinks") . . .

1622555853550.png


"Honi soit qui mal y pense (UK: /ˌɒni ˌswɑː kiː ˌmæl iː ˈpɒ̃s/, US: /- ˌmɑːl -/, French: [ɔni swa ki mal i pɑ̃s]) is a Middle French maxim, meaning "shamed be whoever thinks bad of it", usually translated as "shame on anyone who thinks evil of it" and used as the motto of the British chivalric Order of the Garter.


+ + + + + + + + + + + + + +

However, I note that the same (Garter) crest and motto, is/was also used within the cap-badge, of three of the RLC forming corps . . . (as well as just about everywhere else, according to the inter-web !).

1622556588431.png


1622556606192.png


1622556616224.png


 

Bubbles_Barker

LE
Book Reviewer
"Nil sine labore", is totally new to me !!

As a very new 2Lt (fifty years ago . . . ), I was told by my Adjutant, that the Corps motto was,

"honi soi qui mal y pense", ("Evil be to him, who evil thinks") . . .

View attachment 577892

"Honi soit qui mal y pense (UK: /ˌɒni ˌswɑː kiː ˌmæl iː ˈpɒ̃s/, US: /- ˌmɑːl -/, French: [ɔni swa ki mal i pɑ̃s]) is a Middle French maxim, meaning "shamed be whoever thinks bad of it", usually translated as "shame on anyone who thinks evil of it" and used as the motto of the British chivalric Order of the Garter.


+ + + + + + + + + + + + + +

However, I note that the same (Garter) crest and motto, is/was also used within the cap-badge, of three of the RLC forming corps . . . (as well as just about everywhere else, according to the inter-web !).

View attachment 577896

View attachment 577897

View attachment 577898

Nil Sine Labore was the RCT Corps motto from 1965 on, prior to that it was In Arduis Fidelis for the RASC.

Honi soit qui mal y pense is the Garter motto shared by RASC, RCT and RLC (plus a few others). It's appropriate to the RLC badge as you note as it is RE, RCT and RAOC already. The RCT capbadge also had a Garter Star as the background thus the RLC capbadge has the Garter motto from RE, RCT and RAOC, the Garter Star from the RCT, the Arms of the Board of Ordnance from the RAOC, crossed axes from the RPC and the underlying second motto from the ACC.

Personally I never really took to it as a badge but that's neither here nor there. Trying to get a badge design through that satisfied the sensitivities of the forming Corps tried the patience of many a senior officer plus the details of uniforms, marches etc. If some people think that's all a waste of time then that's their opinion, I think imposing a 'Brave New World' right from the start would have been impossible and effectively would have chucked a lot of fine history into the bin.

Somebody said up thread that reforming the RASC might have been a better idea - perhaps, but it would have been seen as an RCT 'victory' and that would have rightly been unacceptable.
 
Per diem? Per annum? Et cetera? Inter alia? As starters for ten.
The accusation was that senior OXBRIDGE CS quip and converse in Latin to put lesser educated staff down. Apart from the appropriate use of legal terms and accepted grammatical use (which is falling out of favour)*, I've never heard Latin used conversationally.

*I used ipso facto in a policy document recently and was pulled up about it, by someone who clearly didn't understand it. By this fact alone, I will continue to use it.
 
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