What made you think 'enough is enough' and sign off?

Until that point I had only experienced officers that were on the whole gentleman and honourable, to be so brutally disabused of that by a bare faced liar had a lasting impression. What made it worse was he being more concerned that I had found out about his lie rather than he had lied. I had nothing but contempt for him from then on.
I could only count a handful of Officers who were gentlemen and honourable, and they got shafted too.

Met several bare faced liars as well.
 
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I could count a handful of Officers who were gentlemen and honourable, and they got shafted too.
How big are your hands?
 
Part 2 of the redundancy was coming up so I took it. When he asked why I was applying he seemed stunned when I replied”If you need to ******* ask you don’t deserve a ******* answer”. Andy Simkins ****** extraordinaire.
Is this him?

 
Personally it never bothered me that a small number of low grade RDs thought that they hated techs (They didn't really, it was just a 'cool' thing to pretend). I understood that their low self-esteem made them behave that way and sort of felt sorry for them. It also helped that I was able to insult and deride them in ways that they often didn't even understand.

Yeah but on promotion courses where the trade hate meant some misanthropic twisted Combat Signalman (was that really a trade?) had sway over you....
 
Yeah but on promotion courses where the trade hate meant some misanthropic twisted Combat Signalman (was that really a trade?) had sway over you....
It never worked that way. I certainly don't remember that ever happening. Of course they had to be worried that you might be their boss in their next posting. Most people will tell you that techs tended to be top student on most R Sigs mil courses. (RTGs did quite well too).
 
It never worked that way. I certainly don't remember that ever happening. Of course they had to be worried that you might be their boss in their next posting. Most people will tell you that techs tended to be top student on most R Sigs mil courses. (RTGs did quite well too).
In the true spirit of the pantomime that was 4 (Mil Trg) Sqn, RSS, "oh yes it did".

Not Combat Siggies, because there were none left in my time in the regular Corps, but Delay Ops, Powermen etc in that particular shitshow, yes indeedy. I recall one in particular who absolutely delighted in fcuking techs around simply because of their trade. That guy made RSM and subsequently LE, where I left as a Sgt. At the time, I was very bitter about the inequity of it all.

Best part of 20 years later, many thanks are due to that guy. He made me see the truth of it, and thank God he did. But I am crystal clear that that was not his intention.

Agreed on techs and RTGs doing well, but that was in spite of, not because of, the 4 Sqn instructors' best efforts.

As an instructor, I always strove to train people to pass. The same could not be said of those wànkers.

Yes OK, I'm still bitter 20 years later. Blow me :)
 
In the true spirit of the pantomime that was 4 (Mil Trg) Sqn, RSS, "oh yes it did".

Not Combat Siggies, because there were none left in my time in the regular Corps, but Delay Ops, Powermen etc in that particular shitshow, yes indeedy. I recall one in particular who absolutely delighted in fcuking techs around simply because of their trade. That guy made RSM and subsequently LE, where I left as a Sgt. At the time, I was very bitter about the inequity of it all.

Best part of 20 years later, many thanks are due to that guy. He made me see the truth of it, and thank God he did. But I am crystal clear that that was not his intention.

Agreed on techs and RTGs doing well, but that was in spite of, not because of, the 4 Sqn instructors' best efforts.

As an instructor, I always strove to train people to pass. The same could not be said of those wànkers.

Yes OK, I'm still bitter 20 years later. Blow me :)

He may have made RSM and LE but right now he's stagging on at B&Q.
 
Some sad posts here... I served from the early 1960s through the mid 1980s... all I ever wanted to be was a soldier in my old family regiment - KOSB.... members of my family had an unbroken record of service with the British Army since the mid 18th century... the first on record made it to Lt-General... it was all down hill from there!
Served all over the world... Ops in desert, jungle, NI, etc., peace time Cold War stints in Hong Kong, Berlin, Singapore and so on, interesting and rewarding postings to the Depot, Sandhurst, a Junior Soldiers unit, great military courses including Para... wonderful opportunities for adventurous pursuits in Mexico, Africa, Europe and some good quals in mountain leadership, sub-aqua, et al.
In my entire service I only met two cowards (one enlisted one commissioned) and one arrogant asshole (a Gunner Colonel who, despite his social aspirations, was a liar and a thief)... everyone else... superiors and subordinates were in the main men of integrity and a pleasure to work with - still miss them, maintain contact with several from all ranks, and see many each year at reunions, etc (one of the really good aspects of belonging to a close knit regiment).

All was going swimmingly until I met an American flight attendant while on R&R in Cancun from Belize.. dating long distance was a chore, we literally flipped a coin to see who would give up whose career... I lost!
Got married, moved to the USA, was like a fish out of water for almost a year living off my gratuity. After several boring jobs as an insurance broker, security consultant, I had the good fortune to become a cop.. loved the job, then ended up as a prison warden in a maximum security facility, my military experience gave me a leg up in various gang task forces, lectured on management and leadership at local colleges on the side... retired in my very early 60s with a six figure pension (more than I would have had I remained in the Army), live on several acres in a quiet rural area, my only responsibilities are to my animals, maintain a home in the UK too... which I, perhaps, couldn't have aspired to had I remained in the UK.

The entire point is, for all the material benefits and the interesting times I've had in the US (I really like the States), I still regret leaving the Army, the comradeship and lifestyle, got really antsy when GW1 kicked off and lots of my old Army friends deployed.....
Oh - and the f*****g marriage only lasted about 18 months!
 
I’ve seen it happen many times.

One of my old chiefs actually broke down as we were crossing the Atlantic to go home. It’d been an epic deployment, South Atlantic, via South America and the West Indies.

He was genuinely gutted at having to go home to his missus and kids and function like a normal person.
Seen similar many times.
 
He may have made RSM and LE but right now he's stagging on at B&Q.
Indeed. Or selling double glazing.

Experience has proven that I did the right thing by leaving at the time that I did. But that doesn't mean that I don't miss the Army, I do. Like @Busterdog, I regret leaving. Did so the moment the barrier came down behind me. But also very grateful for the life lessons and skills I learned in the Army. I use them every day.

It's been 18 1/2 years since I left. I still can't let go completely; it seems I am institutionalised.

At least I am institutionalised in the greatest Institute the world has ever known.
 
Personally it never bothered me that a small number of low grade RDs thought that they hated techs (They didn't really, it was just a 'cool' thing to pretend). I understood that their low self-esteem made them behave that way and sort of felt sorry for them. It also helped that I was able to insult and deride them in ways that they often didn't even understand.
That would be why you went all the way, and I didn't.

Personality fault of mine. I can't abide wànkers that have superior rank to me. Never done well with that. If there's someone in my CoC (or civvy equivalent) that has a dim view of me and is in a position to fcuk me over, it is time to do something different.
 
It's been 18 1/2 years since I left. I still can't let go completely; it seems I am institutionalised.
Ah yes, that is always a problem that’s never fully solved by the resettlement process. There are certain things that will continue to go right though me when in Civvy Street.

Civilians being 5, 10, 15 minutes late to meetings without so much as an apology.

People who think a chaotic .ppt slide is an excellent way to share information. K.I.S.S and Rule of 7, damnit!

In fact, the general inability of civilians to write with clarity and precision.

I can’t even do Dress Down Friday without breaking into a nervous sweat :grin:
 

Sttrory

Old-Salt
Some sad posts here... I served from the early 1960s through the mid 1980s... all I ever wanted to be was a soldier in my old family regiment - KOSB.... members of my family had an unbroken record of service with the British Army since the mid 18th century... the first on record made it to Lt-General... it was all down hill from there!
Served all over the world... Ops in desert, jungle, NI, etc., peace time Cold War stints in Hong Kong, Berlin, Singapore and so on, interesting and rewarding postings to the Depot, Sandhurst, a Junior Soldiers unit, great military courses including Para... wonderful opportunities for adventurous pursuits in Mexico, Africa, Europe and some good quals in mountain leadership, sub-aqua, et al.
In my entire service I only met two cowards (one enlisted one commissioned) and one arrogant asshole (a Gunner Colonel who, despite his social aspirations, was a liar and a thief)... everyone else... superiors and subordinates were in the main men of integrity and a pleasure to work with - still miss them, maintain contact with several from all ranks, and see many each year at reunions, etc (one of the really good aspects of belonging to a close knit regiment).

All was going swimmingly until I met an American flight attendant while on R&R in Cancun from Belize.. dating long distance was a chore, we literally flipped a coin to see who would give up whose career... I lost!
Got married, moved to the USA, was like a fish out of water for almost a year living off my gratuity. After several boring jobs as an insurance broker, security consultant, I had the good fortune to become a cop.. loved the job, then ended up as a prison warden in a maximum security facility, my military experience gave me a leg up in various gang task forces, lectured on management and leadership at local colleges on the side... retired in my very early 60s with a six figure pension (more than I would have had I remained in the Army), live on several acres in a quiet rural area, my only responsibilities are to my animals, maintain a home in the UK too... which I, perhaps, couldn't have aspired to had I remained in the UK.

The entire point is, for all the material benefits and the interesting times I've had in the US (I really like the States), I still regret leaving the Army, the comradeship and lifestyle, got really antsy when GW1 kicked off and lots of my old Army friends deployed.....
Oh - and the f*****g marriage only lasted about 18 months!
Muff photo? Or never happened
 

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