What is the definition of a corbeam?

#21
Perevodchik said:
The HS batallions of RIR only wear the caubeen on ceremonial. The GS batallions started wearing it again recently,
as a result of an initiative by Col Collins.
Not strictly true, it was a previous CO who re-initated the wearing of the caubeen as part of working dress. Dress Regs for the Regt state that the beret should be worn in working dress and combats, yet the 1st Bn will always wear the caubeen on ops if practicable. When in Service Dress or in Barrack Dress, the caubeen is the correct headwear for the Regt.

The Caubeen is the headress of the Royal Irish Regiment. The caubeen was adopted as the headgear when the new Regiment was formed in 1992 as all the former regiments that make up the new one had worn it. Its name loosely translated from Gaelic means 'Shapeless Hat'. The Q.R.H, formerly the Queens Royal Irish Hussars stilll wear it for ceremonial I believe.
I pretty sure the old UDR did not wear the caubeen, but a beret! The Royal Irish Rangers wore the caubeen as their Regimental headdress and the UDR a beret. On amalgamation both forms of headdress were taken forward by the new Regt.

The Rangers (TA) still have the caubeen and elements of London Irish also wear the caubeen (but with a different coloured hackle).

F
 
#24
Proper description for the caubeen: Hats, Mens, Stupid/Peculiar, Irish infantry for the use of. NSN 1111-99-111-1111 (they needed to keep it simple) :twisted:
 
#25
I once saw a dictionary definition of Caubeen as "a soft felt hat worn by idiots" Now THAT is a p1ss take :)
 
#26
As I understand it, the LIR have always worn just the caubeen. Worn with a standard RIR hackle, less WOs and Offrs who wear St Patricks Blue.
 
#27
Let's not forget the Liverpool Irish who wear a Caubeen (Bonnet, Irish, Green) with a RA capbadge over the right eye and a Blue and Red hackle.
 
#28
ugly said:
Thought on that, are the RIR a rifle regt? they certainly have a lot in common going back to RUR. SD in the rangers had a very similar style to a Rifle regt.
It's not that they have something in common with the RUR. The RUR amalgamated with the Royal Irish Fusliers and Royal Iniiskilling Fusiliers in 1968. (pre merger title was the Ulster Brigade). They came up with as many ideas as possible to keep the tradition of all three regiments, hence the dark green SD's like rifle regiments. Their corps of bugles still do drill rifle regiment style as well.

'Caubeen' is Irish gaelic for "hat" - nothing else, but the name became associated with the style of hat worn by Irish infantry regiments. QRH don't wear it in ceremonials, except for pipers. QRH are cavalry and wear a "busby" - not to be confused with the guards "bearskin" which is often incorrectly called a busby.
 
#29
GDav said:
It's not that they have something in common with the RUR. The RUR amalgamated with the Royal Irish Fusliers and Royal Iniiskilling Fusiliers in 1968. (pre merger title was the Ulster Brigade).
North Irish Brigade It excluded Cavan, Monaghan (both (Princess Victoria's) Royal Irish Fusiliers) and Donegal (Royal Inniskillin Fusiliers).

The list of county affiliations is online: http://www.geocities.com/littlegreenmen.geo/ICR.htm
 
#30
My apologies, North Irish Brigade it was. There was no exclusion however as the counties you mention were not part of the UK in the 1960's, despite their historical connection.
 
#31
frankie said:
The Caubeen is the headress of the Royal Irish Regiment. The caubeen was adopted as the headgear when the new Regiment was formed in 1992 as all the former regiments that make up the new one had worn it. Its name loosely translated from Gaelic means 'Shapeless Hat'. The Q.R.H, formerly the Queens Royal Irish Hussars stilll wear it for ceremonial I believe.
I pretty sure the old UDR did not wear the caubeen, but a beret! The Royal Irish Rangers wore the caubeen as their Regimental headdress and the UDR a beret. On amalgamation both forms of headdress were taken forward by the new Regt.

The Rangers (TA) still have the caubeen and elements of London Irish also wear the caubeen (but with a different coloured hackle).
F
UDR wore a black beret - so all the aul moaners who were UDR in my office tell me anyway.
 
#32
GDav said:
My apologies, North Irish Brigade it was. There was no exclusion however as the counties you mention were not part of the UK in the 1960's, despite their historical connection.
Aye, hence the need to differentiate between Ulster (a 9 county province of the old Kingdom of Ireland) and Northern Ireland (a 6 county province of the UK of GB and NI)
 
#33
eSeL said:
frankie said:
The Caubeen is the headress of the Royal Irish Regiment. The caubeen was adopted as the headgear when the new Regiment was formed in 1992 as all the former regiments that make up the new one had worn it. Its name loosely translated from Gaelic means 'Shapeless Hat'. The Q.R.H, formerly the Queens Royal Irish Hussars stilll wear it for ceremonial I believe.
I pretty sure the old UDR did not wear the caubeen, but a beret! The Royal Irish Rangers wore the caubeen as their Regimental headdress and the UDR a beret. On amalgamation both forms of headdress were taken forward by the new Regt.

The Rangers (TA) still have the caubeen and elements of London Irish also wear the caubeen (but with a different coloured hackle).
F
UDR wore a black beret - so all the aul moaners who were UDR in my office tell me anyway.
We wore a dark green beret in the UDR. Only pipers wore a caubeen - but no hackle.
 
#34
Sapukay said:
GDav said:
My apologies, North Irish Brigade it was. There was no exclusion however as the counties you mention were not part of the UK in the 1960's, despite their historical connection.
Aye, hence the need to differentiate between Ulster (a 9 county province of the old Kingdom of Ireland) and Northern Ireland (a 6 county province of the UK of GB and NI)
There is no real need to differentiate. Ulstermen are still Ulstermen.
 
#35
caubeen hat worn by the Royal Irish Regiment, comfortable to wear well at least mine is... no set way to be worn as you will see alot of weird and wonderful ways rangers have shaped them.Sometimes refered to as a joiners nailbag by my wise ole csm.
 
#36
Caubeen is Gaelic for 'shapeless hat', 2 R Irish wore the Caubeen as their headress in all uniforms and whilst on their tour of Fermanagh. If I remember correctly Lt Col Collins served with 2 R Irish.
 
#37
Cpl_Wolf said:
Caubeen is Gaelic for 'shapeless hat', 2 R Irish wore the Caubeen as their headress in all uniforms and whilst on their tour of Fermanagh. If I remember correctly Lt Col Collins served with 2 R Irish.
Caubeen is gaelic for "hat". That is all.
 
#38
GDav, just going by what I was told whilst serving, :D Someone asked about the Rifle look of the uniform, this is to remember the Royal Ulster Rifles after the 1968 amalgamation which lead to the forming of the Royal Irish Rangers. The Bugles wore Rifle kit for No1's complete with Baker Sword and marched at the rifle pace. The barrack dress trousers of the R Irish were not normal barrack dress trousers but Trousers, piper green. Hope that helps.
 
#39
Cpl_Wolf said:
GDav, just going by what I was told whilst serving, :D Someone asked about the Rifle look of the uniform, this is to remember the Royal Ulster Rifles after the 1968 amalgamation which lead to the forming of the Royal Irish Rangers. The Bugles wore Rifle kit for No1's complete with Baker Sword and marched at the rifle pace. The barrack dress trousers of the R Irish were not normal barrack dress trousers but Trousers, piper green. Hope that helps.
Why do you think it would help when I wrote all that a page back? No offence.
 
#40
I've got a book about the London Regt. that has photos of D Coy (LIR). Caubeens are shown, but there's also a photo of D Coy guys in a recce Rover where they're wearing rifle green berets & the badges appear to be over the RIGHT eye dans la mode Francais. regimental tradition or transposed image?
 

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