What is the best war memorial?

Holocaust rather than war memorial, but I think this one is the one I’ve remembered most, as it caught me completely off guard whilst exploring the old town of Annecy. Really affected me for some reason, both the unexpectedness of it and having kids the same age.

View attachment 390004
I would put money that they were Polish Jews. Various Polish governments in the 1920s and 1930 were hostile to Jews, and depending where they lived many faced local enmity. Lots emigrated, one of the countries most receptive to emigrant Poles was France. France had its own demographic issues after WW1 and Poles in particular were welcomed in mining communities.
How awful that they thought they were moving to a better life, to face that.
 

overopensights

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There is a small town in the Welsh valleys, its population was about 19000 in 1914, shown is just one surname of the fallen, some are brothers, in one case a father and son are shown.
IMG_1051.jpg
is the list of one surname of the fallen. Some are brothers, in one case father and son are listed.
 
There is a small town in the Welsh valleys, its population was about 19000 in 1914, shown is just one surname of the fallen, some are brothers, in one case a father and son are shown. View attachment 405389 is the list of one surname of the fallen. Some are brothers, in one case father and son are listed.
Where is that?

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overopensights

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Where is that?

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Tredegar ( it was Monmouthshire), most of the casualties were on the 8th of May 1915 during 2nd Ypres.
 

overopensights

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Roll call in that Bn must have been fun
I will relate it to you, 'One company commander (Capt Steele) called the roll the following morning and mustered only about 11 men. He called the roll slowly and asked for answers of when last seen etc, every few minutes he muttered "My boys my lovely boys" However has it did for the whole four years, the line held, Ypres was saved thus the channel port also saved.
 
I will relate it to you, 'One company commander (Capt Steele) called the roll the following morning and mustered only about 11 men. He called the roll slowly and asked for answers of when last seen etc, every few minutes he muttered "My boys my lovely boys" However has it did for the whole four years, the line held, Ypres was saved thus the channel port also saved.
Just had a quick read up on this and it was 'interesting' to say the least. All three battalions of the Monmouthshire's were in the line on that day but within two different divisions; 1/1 and 1/3 were in the 28 Div and 1/2 was in the 4 Div). All three lost their CO's and casualties were so severe that for a while all three units were temporarily withdrawn onto the LoC and amalgamated with each other, as being TF they couldn't be guaranteed reinforcements from the UK.

There are parallels here with my great, great uncle's unit (1/5th Bn, the London Regt (London Rifle Brigade)) who also lost heavily at 2nd Ypres and were subsequently withdrawn onto the LoC too, and also temporarily amalgamated with other TF battalions of the London Regt for the same reasons as the Monmouth's.
 
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I will relate it to you, 'One company commander (Capt Steele) called the roll the following morning and mustered only about 11 men. He called the roll slowly and asked for answers of when last seen etc, every few minutes he muttered "My boys my lovely boys" However has it did for the whole four years, the line held, Ypres was saved thus the channel port also saved.
Sorry I didn't mean to make light of the memorial, bad taste. A scene that was repeated no doubt many times across the whole front, but 11 men from a place that size is terrible
 
Just had a quick read up on this and it was 'interesting' to say the least. All three battalions of the Monmouthshire's were in the line on that day but within two different divisions; 1/1 and 1/3 were in the 28 Div and 1/2 was in the 4 Div). All three lost their CO's and casualties were so severe that for a while all three units were temporarily withdrawn onto the LoC and amalgamated with each other, as being TF they couldn't be guaranteed reinforcements from the UK.

There are parallels here with my great, great uncle's unit (1/5th Bn, the London Regt (London Rifle Brigade)),who also lost heavily at 2nd Ypres and were also withdrawn onto the LoC and temporarily amalgamated with other TF battalions of the London Regt for the same reasons as the Monmouth's.

My Great Grandfather and his brother served in the 2nd Battalion Monmouthshire regiment. And both survived the second battle of Ypres. Often think of what they went through, especially on the 8th of May 1915.
 

overopensights

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Sorry I didn't mean to make light of the memorial, bad taste. A scene that was repeated no doubt many times across the whole front, but 11 men from a place that size is terrible
No problem! I didn't take it the wrong way, I assumed 'as you meant it' the 22 Davies and roll calls!
 
I am of the opinion that there simply isn't a "best" war memorial.

Some time ago I posted a photo of a bench which the family of a young Marine had erected to his memory on a hill that he used to run up. You will find it in the Arrsers Self Taken Photo Collection thread but I make no excuses for reproducing part of it it here.

1563997380498.png

https://www.arrse.co.uk/community/threads/arrsers-self-taken-photo-collection.173251/page-1943#lg=attachment250896&slide=0
Obviously a much loved young man.

I care nothing if this man was a hero or not but this memorial is as fine as any statue.

I read it and it suddenly goes all dusty.
 
At 7620 feet in the Pyrenees, on the route of the "Le Chemin de la liberte, just below Pic de Lampau


Chemim RAF compressed.JPG



Aircraft wreckage still in situ

Halifax bomber on a training sortie 80 km off route


High on the hill
 
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