what is it? (40mm gun content)

#21
thanks gents i will give it some thoughts i believe its a bit rarer than i thought. i ony got it today. i have not been able to find any images or information on it at all. it is a sort of family thing so I will attempt to find it a good home. I have no idea of its possible value. i will try the RA museum. thanks again.
 
#22
thanks gents i will give it some thoughts i believe its a bit rarer than i thought. i ony got it today. i have not been able to find any images or information on it at all. it is a sort of family thing so I will attempt to find it a good home. I have no idea of its possible value. i will try the RA museum. thanks again.
Don't let them sell you short...
 
#23
Less than one mile, as the Crow flies, from my house in Crete, is a Bailey bridge over a river.
I used it a lot for about 5 years. The structure is fine.
The decking however leaves much to be desired. Totally unmaintained, and a considered adventure, each time it was crossed.
My dad erected many a Bailey bridge, but not that one!
 
#25
It looks like a scale model of a Bofors 40/60 (as opposed to the later 40/70 model). Sadly, it looks as though a few bits are missing: ring sites, ammunition stowage, etc.

Still, an interesting piece of work for all that. Nice find!
 
#26
Would love to know more about this model, if you still have it. I'm a bit of a collector of these old training models and do a lot of work with Mil Eng Museums around the world. Let me know if you've still got it, pls?
 
#27
Miltra used to make a series of recognition models and training aids for the military.

Miltra were very active back in the Warsaw Pact days building models off the back of photo's acquired through various agencies. The models ranged from something barely recognisable as a tracked vehicle when the T80 first came out to something that so detailed that looked like if your Action Man doll had the keys for it he could jump in and drive off.

As this model is green and not in pure presentation piece style made of silver, pewter, or brass, I would hazard a guess that it is an old Miltra piece. Back in the 80's if I recall what the Int badgeman told me about his unit Miltra collection similar to the sort of detail and scale here he (the MoD) was paying over a grand a piece for each one - lots of man hours in making them. So the price nowadays would be easily four, or five, times that grand+ back in the 80's.

Note: I just had a decko for Miltra and it seem's they are now a part of Ilford Engineering.
 
#31
Being nosey, do you care to share?
Oh, yeah, Sorry Mate. Bit remiss of me there, I think it was made by Bassett-Lowke in Northamptonshire, they had the contract for all Military training models right up until they went out of business in about 1964/65. They made a model of the Mulberry Harbour for the D-Day planning and every vehicle, ship and Landing craft that would be used with it, all so the planners could work out loading and unloading schedules. They also made training models for the Bailey Bridge in late 1943/44 and after the war continued to 'enhance' those early sets with conversion sets for Bailey Pontoons, Standard Widened Bailey Bridge, Cribs and Piers and by 1953 Extra Wide Bailey bridge. They did the same again for HGB when it came into service, one of the last training models they produced was the Crib and Pier set for HGB which came out in the early 1960's. They most likely would have had the contract for MGB except they went out of business in 1965. Miltra then came to the fore and made the MGB models.

Bassett-Lowke also made Models of Folding Boat Equipment and the old Inglis Bridge and there's some suggestion that they were making 'map models' during WWI and in the Inter-war period too. Hard to tell because all of Bassett-Lowke's business records apparently went into a skip in 1965! ...and the TNA is a disaster of a place to try to find anything of use!

There's a fantastic model of the Mulberry harbour in the museum at Arromanche, this was also made by Bassett-Lowke and was made specially for the museum at Arromanche (who had a bit of a difficult job raising the money to pay for it at the time... it's now one of their biggest draws). Some people will tell you the model in Arromanche is the original D-Day planning model but it isn't it was specially made for that museum in the early 1950's.

Incidentally, as part of my research I spoke with a Northamptonshire women who's father worked at Bassett-Lowke during the war. He was a very young man and because of the secrecy around the work he was doing, and the importance of it, he was not permitted to discuss it nor was he permitted to quit and join the Army (which he really wanted to do). All his school friends went off to war and many did not come back. He lived the rest of his life with a kind of shame hanging over him (partly self-imposed) because he himself felt he'd sat out the war building models when others gave so much. He'd never had a foreign holiday in his life but towards the end his daughter took him to Normandy and when she took him to the Arromanche Museum she told the staff who he was and how he had made both their model and the previous models for the D-Day invasion. Of course the staff made such a fuss over him and, given the time of year, there was also quite a number of the old and the bold there too. They too made a fuss of him, left in tears when they explained to him that his work saved countless lives and ensured that the landings were such a success and that casualties were far, far lower than anticipated. For the first time in his life he actually felt that his efforts during the war meant something. He sadly died about a year later!
 

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