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What is a regiment?

#1
Yes I know what it is.

Group of battalions, recruited traditional from same geographic area. Each regiment has its little ways of doing things, history, uniform, etc. With all the mergers etc over the last 10+ years, some now only exist as at company level.

I've a question. What functions does for example the Regimental HQ of the Royal Welsh perform, that could not be carried out by either of the battalions - 1 R WELSH (formerly The Royal Welch Fusiliers) or 2 R WELSH (The Royal Regiment Wales)?
 
#2
I think a regiment is an idea more than anything else.

I know that this isn't a very helpful answer.

The regimental system has been broken for quite a long time for all the regiments that consisted of:
1 Btn (Regular)
2 Btn (Reserves)
3 Btn (TA)

Perhaps with the new arrangements there will be a real role for RHQ but as I suspect Battalions will continue to be deployed independently of Regiments there probably won't.

I doubt RHQ has had a war fighting function since 1908.

I'm quite happy to bow to superior knowledge.
 

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#3
Something that this gubment has totally fecked up. IM Humble O :cry:
 
#4
Liked most things British; exceptionally difficult to define in one sentence, but you know one when you see one.

RHQ's do this kind of stuff (as you probably already know)

http://www.army.mod.uk/royalanglian/regimental_headquarters/index.htm

Now that everyone spends so much time on ops, I would guess that the welfare side of their job is more critical than ever.

It's also good to have someone who thinks it's their job to maintain the Regimental traditions, other than the Adj.
 
#5
But welfare of the troops is the job of all commanders.

Using Royal Anglican Regt as an example, the have:
Regimental Colonel
Regimental Secretary
Assistant Regimental Secretary
Regimental Careers Officer
Chief Clerk
Typist
Clerk

There is 3 civilians & 1 officer that could be employed in what IMO is a reduntant organisation.

Yet archives are held on CD or at the APC.
They seek officer cadets that they can sponsor through training - why not base it on needs of the service & where the come from?

Then you have a regimental association for ex-members thats fair enough (social side etc), it has little to do with the workings of the unit. But this role is also the job of Royal British Legion & SSAFA.

I just fail to see why the Inf Bn can't do the job. With all the mergers etc, the unit has closer links to the orginal regiments than the regimental HQ.
 
#6
irlsgt said:
Using Royal Anglican Regt as an example,
:D Let's just hope they never try to merge us with The Royal Catholic Regt, eh??

(Don't worry, Bliar makes the same mistake. Most of us over here are still Puritans, anyway).

The Queens Own Muslim, Quaker and Baptist Rifles are recruiting well, I hear... :p
 
#7
The Regimental HQ is there to conduct a plethora of tasks.

Maintain budgets for:
Soldier Welfare (Serving and Old)
Regimental Museums
Manage communications for the regiment as a whole to serving and retired soldiers, and the local communities.
Provide a focus for maintenance of the relationship with the Counties when the Battalions are normally based nowhere near their counties.
Provide administrative support for the Regimental Council
and so on....

If you where the Adjt, Ops Off or Families Officer in an operational battalion would you want to be doing all this on top of your fighting roll?
 
#8
EX_STAB said:
I doubt RHQ has had a war fighting function since 1908.

I'm quite happy to bow to superior knowledge.
RHQ has never had a warfighting function, the closest we got to the French idea was some 1898 thoughts on creating 4 Regular Bns per Regt, with one stationed overseas (or 3 for the Guards, since they weren't posted to the colonies), and the 3 remaining forming a demi-brigade a la Prussia etc.

While some of the Regiments got the extra Bns (and some kept them until WW1, the 7th Royal Fusiliers keeping 4 regular Bns into the 1920's), the Boer War intervened.

This increase would have given the UK 20 Regular Divisions at Home :-O
 
#9
Ah the good old days when a General actually had a brigade upwards to command.... LOL - gimme a break...... Blair....Command.... hahahaha, where are my Valium..... Brigades LOL.....Divisions.....aRgEHHHH
 
#11
What - we are as big as a Regiment???? You are taking the pish - we don't even haver an MT Sgt anymore - the guys a civvy - The British Army of the 21st Century..... A platoon and a Serco white fleet manager!
 
#12
me n bee said:
What - we are as big as a Regiment???? You are taking the pish - we don't even haver an MT Sgt anymore - the guys a civvy - The British Army of the 21st Century..... A platoon and a Serco white fleet manager!
You're probably right regarding the outsourced assets - but in my understanding, RHQs are a continuity thing. They provide links to the recruiting base which the full-on Regular Army battalion isn't geared for. COs would howl if they were asked to provide, from their operational establishments, the staff to carry out the many & varied functions of the RHQs. I don't think we have had infantry Regiments (i.e: 2> same-source battalions as a manoeuvre force in the field) since Wellington's day. In a recruiting & welfare sense, RHQs are a hugely important part of the mix.
Cheers,
Cliff.
 
#13
If nothing else, your regimental system confuses the hell out of allied forces so imagine the havoc it causes opponents when they try to establish an M/TOE... :D
 
#14
angular said:
irlsgt said:
Using Royal Anglican Regt as an example,
:D Let's just hope they never try to merge us with The Royal Catholic Regt, eh??

(Don't worry, Bliar makes the same mistake. Most of us over here are still Puritans, anyway).

The Queens Own Muslim, Quaker and Baptist Rifles are recruiting well, I hear... :p
:D I havn't laughed so much in years. Top Post :D
 
#15
I think, for those that have been or are in Regiments rather than corps', its rather like being in a tribe. You feel a sense of belonging.

Despite amalgamations, a newer slighly different but inherantly the same species emerges.

A little bit like the history of the peoples of these islands if you think on it.
 
#16
londonirish said:
I think, for those that have been or are in Regiments rather than corps', its rather like being in a tribe. You feel a sense of belonging.

Despite amalgamations, a newer slighly different but inherantly the same species emerges.

A little bit like the history of the peoples of these islands if you think on it.
What a perceptive comment. I think "tribal" is the best adjective for the British Army Regimental system. Descended from feudal militia, they traditionally identified more closely with their region than with the Crown. I think the British Army can take pride in its apolitical character. The 1650s gave the military caste a unique benchmark regarding its loyalties. The way they have followed the lessons learnt in the Civil War, provides world leadership in this field.
 
#17
CliSwe said:
londonirish said:
I think, for those that have been or are in Regiments rather than corps', its rather like being in a tribe. You feel a sense of belonging.

Despite amalgamations, a newer slighly different but inherantly the same species emerges.

A little bit like the history of the peoples of these islands if you think on it.
What a perceptive comment. I think "tribal" is the best adjective for the British Army Regimental system. Descended from feudal militia, they traditionally identified more closely with their region than with the Crown. I think the British Army can take pride in its apolitical character. The 1650s gave the military caste a unique benchmark regarding its loyalties. The way they have followed the lessons learnt in the Civil War, provides world leadership in this field.
Thankyou...(bows, doffs cap).

Please tell me more of your views on the way the CW impacted the army since...genuinley interested.

I don't know much about it, but are you hinting that the soldiers followed the regiment, regardless of whether it was Crown or Parliament?

Interestingly, the two Royal Regiment(s) of Ireland met once in a brief skirmish in a forest in belgium ikn the 1700s, one French, one British.
 
#18
Yes I know what it is.

Group of battalions, recruited traditional from same geographic area.
When you are considering the role of RHQ your narrow view of what a regiment is does not hold. As has been said by others it is akin to a tribe or a family. It includes not only the battalions Reg and TA, but those posted away from the battalions, those who have served previously, the cadets who are affiliated to it. RHQ is the glue that binds it all together.

Amalgamations do not make it redundant, but in many ways more important as a new tribe or family needs to be bound together. Take a look at The Rifles action plan here to get some idea of the breadth of what needs to be done and you soon agree that no Battalion has the time or resources to do all of these things.

http://www.army.mod.uk/linkedfiles/infantry/regts/the_rifles/governance/rifles_action_plan.doc

If you do away with it you might just as well do away with the regimental system and you won't find much support for that here I would suggest.
 
#19
Is the Colonel of a Regiment a honorary title or is it a fulltime job?

Reason I ask is I was reading something about the trooping of the colour and one of the rehearsals is with the Colonel of the Irish Guards (their colour is being trooped this year) and he is a major-general.

Does he have another fulltime job as well and this is just a title with some responsibilities?
 
#20
irlsgt said:
Is the Colonel of a Regiment a honorary title or is it a fulltime job?

Reason I ask is I was reading something about the trooping of the colour and one of the rehearsals is with the Colonel of the Irish Guards (their colour is being trooped this year) and he is a major-general.

Does he have another fulltime job as well and this is just a title with some responsibilities?
Colonel of the Regiment is an honorary position held by a senior serving or ex serving officer. Us Guardsmen manage to confuse most people by liberally sprinkling around the word Colonel ... Regimental Lieutenant Colonel, Colonel of the Regiment, Colonel in Chief .... lawks a mercy it's such fun!

Lots of the confusion dates back to the days when Captains commanded Companies, Majors commanded Battalion etc etc. As the British Army loves its tradition, with good reason and excellent effect, the old titles hang on when the job has long vanished.
 

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