What if Operation Eagle Claw succeeded

An American classmate (mature student in his late 40s ex USAF HC-130/AC-130) back at Uni the 90s, took part in Eagle Claw albeit left behind in Egypt with several others as their a/c went east.
How The Iran Hostage Rescue Was Supposed To Go Down If It Hadn't Ended Early In Disaster

There were plans afterwards called Honey Badger that would involve the 82nd or 101st Abn Div then new UH-60A Blackhawk en masse to rescue the hostages etc

cheers
 
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An American classmate (mature student in his late 40s ex USAF HC-130/AC-130) back at Uni the 90s, took part in Eagle Claw albeit left behind in Egypt with several others as their a/c went east.
How The Iran Hostage Rescue Was Supposed To Go Down If It Hadn't Ended Early In Disaster

I understand there were plans afterwards called Honey Badger that would involve the 82nd or 101st Abn Div then new UH-60A Blackhawk en masse to rescue the hostages etc .

cheers
Was the Blackhawk in service then? I thought the first time it was used in action was in Grenada in October 1983.
 

Yokel

LE
What difference would it have made if the Bkackhawk was in service? The RH-53s that flew from USS Nimitz needed refuelling, which led to the Desert One disaster. The plan was very complex and depended on lots of things working exactly to plan.

The serviceability of the helicopters was not good - there was a lack of experience of having such a large aircraft aboard a carrier - it is too big even for a CVN. There were maintenance problems with maintenance - and it was one aircraft turning back and two going unserviceable on the ground which led to the mission being aborted.

Was the mission feasible? Tehran is hundreds of miles from the sea.
 
What difference would it have made if the Bkackhawk was in service? The RH-53s that flew from USS Nimitz needed refuelling, which led to the Desert One disaster. The plan was very complex and depended on lots of things working exactly to plan.

The serviceability of the helicopters was not good - there was a lack of experience of having such a large aircraft aboard a carrier - it is too big even for a CVN. There were maintenance problems with maintenance - and it was one aircraft turning back and two going unserviceable on the ground which led to the mission being aborted.

Was the mission feasible? Tehran is hundreds of miles from the sea.

Sorry maybe I did not explain clearly, in the aftermath of the disastrous attempts there was Honey Badger. Honey Badger would have been a second attempt involving semi mass air assault using units from the 101st Airborne Division Aviation brigades, to rescue the hostages The planned assault force also involved CH-47C Chinooks, FARPS, etc.
Month after the disaster, the crews started to practise with gusto NVGs in UH-60A.

And also Ceedible Sport - modified VSTOl Herk







cheers
 
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Sorry maybe I did not explain clearly, in the aftermath of the disastrous attempts there was Honey Badger. Honey Badger would have been a second attempt involving semi mass air assault using units from the 101st Airborne Division Aviation brigades, to rescue the hostages The planned assault force also involved CH-47C Chinooks, FARPS, etc.
Month after the disaster, the crews started to practise with gusto NVGs in UH-60A.

And also Ceedible Sport - modified VSTOl Herk







cheers
I never knew the Clinton Administration was that desperate to save face in the hostage crisis to have authorized a modification to the C-130 Hercules air frame to use rockets to land and to take off. Interesting notion but it appeared to go pear shaped very quickly.
 
I never knew the Clinton Administration was that desperate to save face in the hostage crisis to have authorized a modification to the C-130 Hercules air frame to use rockets to land and to take off. Interesting notion but it appeared to go pear shaped very quickly.
You mean the Carter the. Reagan administration

cheers
 
An American classmate (mature student in his late 40s ex USAF HC-130/AC-130) back at Uni the 90s, took part in Eagle Claw albeit left behind in Egypt with several others as their a/c went east.
How The Iran Hostage Rescue Was Supposed To Go Down If It Hadn't Ended Early In Disaster

There were plans afterwards called Honey Badger that would involve the 82nd or 101st Abn Div then new UH-60A Blackhawk en masse to rescue the hostages etc

cheers
IIRC two A/C collided, on the ground in a sandstorm. I still remember the harrowing pictures of troopers burned to death in the desert.
 
You mean the Carter the. Reagan administration

cheers
You're right. I meant to say Carter, but it came out Clinton. Little matter though; they both were Dumbocrats. It didn't help that both of their last names started with "C".

I seem to remember the Ayatollahs in Iran twisted the knife in Peanut Jimmy's heart by delaying releasing the hostages until the day Mr. Reagan was sworn in as president on 20 Jan 1981.
 
What difference would it have made if the Bkackhawk was in service? The RH-53s that flew from USS Nimitz needed refuelling, which led to the Desert One disaster. The plan was very complex and depended on lots of things working exactly to plan.

The serviceability of the helicopters was not good - there was a lack of experience of having such a large aircraft aboard a carrier - it is too big even for a CVN. There were maintenance problems with maintenance - and it was one aircraft turning back and two going unserviceable on the ground which led to the mission being aborted.

Was the mission feasible? Tehran is hundreds of miles from the sea.
The helicopters used were frequently used on board naval vessels - the RH-53D were navy aircraft used for minesweeping. Although usually operated off assault vessels they were used to being on carriers and as a bit of OPSEC they were partly chosen for that reason.
see also: Delta Force, C A Beckworth and D Knox, 1984
 
IIRC two A/C collided, on the ground in a sandstorm. I still remember the harrowing pictures of troopers burned to death in the desert.
In his book Beckworth described how when they had to exit the burning Herc one operaotor thought it was airborne due to the vibrations of the helo partly attached to it.

they all calmly lined up to exit and that guy threw himself out the door as if parachuting. When it was pointed out he wasn’t wearing a parachute his reply was on the lines of ‘one problem at a time...’
 

Le_addeur_noir

On ROPS
On ROPs
Was the Blackhawk in service then? I thought the first time it was used in action was in Grenada in October 1983.

Yes they were. Fort Rucker had their first 3 in September 1979 when I was there ( IIRC tail numbers 77-22718, 22719 and 22720) and the 101st had started to receive theirs in early '80 (IIRC). The first exercise with UH-60As from the 101st was at Upper Heyford in November 1981.
 
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Le_addeur_noir

On ROPS
On ROPs
IIRC two A/C collided, on the ground in a sandstorm. I still remember the harrowing pictures of troopers burned to death in the desert.

They were re-positioning a RH-53D either post or prior to re-fueling when it collided with C-130E-1 62-1809 ( a special mission C-130E of the 7th ACCS at Keesler AFB, MS). The RH-53Ds were from NAS Norfolk, VA.
 
Sorry maybe I did not explain clearly, in the aftermath of the disastrous attempts there was Honey Badger. Honey Badger would have been a second attempt involving semi mass air assault using units from the 101st Airborne Division Aviation brigades, to rescue the hostages The planned assault force also involved CH-47C Chinooks, FARPS, etc.
Month after the disaster, the crews started to practise with gusto NVGs in UH-60A.

And also Ceedible Sport - modified VSTOl Herk







cheers
Sounds more like a full scale invasion then a hostage rescue mission.
 
The serviceability of the helicopters was not good - there was a lack of experience of having such a large aircraft aboard a carrier - it is too big even for a CVN.
CH-53 were in USN/USMC service on smaller carriers from 1971 in a variety of roles including AMCM, and used in the Evacuation of Saigon, so use on board a CVN is not out of the ordinary
 
CH-53 were in USN/USMC service on smaller carriers from 1971 in a variety of roles including AMCM, and used in the Evacuation of Saigon, so use on board a CVN is not out of the ordinary
Used to see them on the decks of the Iwo Jima helicopter carriers and the Tarawa class Assault ships in Hong Kong Harbour in the mid eighties with all the jar heads running around the deck. Stop over on their WestPac cruises.
 

Le_addeur_noir

On ROPS
On ROPs
Used to see them on the decks of the Iwo Jima helicopter carriers and the Tarawa class Assault ships in Hong Kong Harbour in the mid eighties with all the jar heads running around the deck. Stop over on their WestPac cruises.
There used to be near yearly visits to Portsmouth or Southampton of LPHs or LHAs when the USMC were on exercise off Norway in the 70s and 80s as well with A/UH-1, CH-46s and CH-53A or Ds on board.
 
Maybe the planners should have talked to the millionaire Ross Perot for pointers (and maybe they did and didn't want to admit it.) He got 2 of his EDS employees out of Qasr Prison and out of Iran by car. By 15 Feb 1979 they were over the border in Turkey and free as air. Way to go. Good beard pull of The Ayatollah.

Iran Hostage Rescue 1979
 

Le_addeur_noir

On ROPS
On ROPs
Ross Perot showed up in Laos in his Boeing 707 during the Vietnam war in a bid to free US POWs, but was given the f-off by the US embassy in Vientiane.
 
Ross Perot recruited the colonel who was involved with the Son Tay rescue mission for his Iran jolly. It ended better than the Vietnam mission did.

Uncommon Valor (1983) is (imho) is a (mostly fictional) retelling of how a millionaire got together with a Special Forces colonel to organize a hostage rescue. Gene Hackman plays the colonel and Robert Stack plays the millionaire. It's a very entertaining action move, and a cut above its contemporary Rambo.

Gene Hackman.JPG
 
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