What happens when the furlough ends...

goodoldboy

MIA
Book Reviewer
One disadvantage of working from home that a friend of mine is finding is this:

They changed jobs a few weeks before the lockdown and are working from home to the best of their ability.

But if they need to know about working practices rather than saying:

'How do I do this or where can I find that?' with someone giving an instant reply or showing them straight away the answer has to be obtained by e-mail with the delays that causes.

Only a little thing but something I hadn't thought of.
Telephone is better and quicker, regular video links are essential at first...
 
Telephone is better and quicker, regular video links are essential at first...

....or PC drives accessible to all, where most relevant to role, company info is located - and the brains to look for it rather than be an idle feck asking everyone else. ...which in turn lends to you being dependent on them , which means they have some stand off power over you .

I'm too stroppy to grant someone that advantage.
 
But if they need to know about working practices rather than saying: 'How do I do this or where can I find that?' with someone giving an instant reply or showing them straight away the answer has to be obtained by e-mail with the delays that causes.
SOP for the NHS - whether in the office next door or not.
 
When the furlough ends, I imagine millions of people will have to put their grown up clothes back on and head out to earn their living again.
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Possibly excluding the ones seen standing shoulder to shoulder with the emergency services in the park this morning.

 

The_Duke

LE
Moderator
Whilst inclined to agree with you, apparently we would both be wrong.
Productivity from those newly working from home has dropped by less than 1%

Can't remember the source, but it was a reputable one
The key statistic is what that looks like at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months.

On stats alone, we are looking good. However, there is a reliance on the “We are all in this together” part, and that globally there isn’t much of a choice. Our staff are having to work harder to achieve the same numbers and the cracks are starting to show.
Will we all go back to Monday to Friday 9-5 with WFH a rare exception? Probably not. Will we all stay at home for good and let the office lease lapse? Not a chance in hell.
 
Do companies asking you to work from home provide any help? My mate is getting about £500 to buy a desk and he’s been allowed to have his (expensively fitted) office chair taken to his house. Computer accessories are being provided and he will be paid about £15 a month to cover extra electricity costs. He’s loosing access to a subsidised canteen. The company reckon that over about three years employment they’ll break even. (They don’t have to clean his workspace or provide security/lighting for it, nor provide him a parking space.)
 
Do companies asking you to work from home provide any help?

My mate is getting about £500 to buy a desk and he’s been allowed to have his (expensively fitted) office chair taken to his house.

Computer accessories are being provided and he will be paid about £15 a month to cover extra electricity costs.

He’s loosing access to a subsidized canteen.

The company reckon that over about three years employment they’ll break even. (They don’t have to clean his workspace or provide security/lighting for it, nor provide him a parking space.)

As your post states, some will do everything required ...and i think that once a cost analysis is done, many others will follow this example..
 
I quite agree. Business will have a flirtation with the idea and swiftly return to office blocks. I also doubt that people will want to work from home for any lengthy period of time - it's boring, isolating, and difficult to stay in the right headspace. I expect staff turnover to be high amongst companies which use the idea with workers preferring to go to those which don't. It will be by no means the easy win that businessess think it will.
Workers,that's quite funny.
 
One disadvantage of working from home that a friend of mine is finding is this:

They changed jobs a few weeks before the lockdown and are working from home to the best of their ability.

But if they need to know about working practices rather than saying:

'How do I do this or where can I find that?' with someone giving an instant reply or showing them straight away the answer has to be obtained by e-mail with the delays that causes.

Only a little thing but something I hadn't thought of.
Can be solved by having a chat-window permanently open to a mentor (ie. the experienced person usually at the next desk) and pinging them the question. Also done here when out of the office at a customer site where weird questions pop-up. There are both commercial chat programs and also internal-IT-department (nominally more secure) ones available. A whiteboard or shared-document screen is handy. The chat dialog is logged so one is not inclined to start talking about non-business stuff.
 
Do companies asking you to work from home provide any help? My mate is getting about £500 to buy a desk and he’s been allowed to have his (expensively fitted) office chair taken to his house. Computer accessories are being provided and he will be paid about £15 a month to cover extra electricity costs. He’s loosing access to a subsidised canteen. The company reckon that over about three years employment they’ll break even. (They don’t have to clean his workspace or provide security/lighting for it, nor provide him a parking space.)
My setup is free internet, two monitors, docking station and laptop, the chair was around £300 three years ago, we also get £35 every quarter for WFH.
 

wheel

LE
I predict a lot of vacant office space over the next 12-18 months. Companies are beginning to realise that the advantages of home working over costs of lease/rental are considerable. Even to the degree of staggered home working- office based so reduced floor space and admin requirements whilst maintaining the team work contact.
I was in conversation with an MD of electronics manufacturer last week who has realised that he has been wasting two hours a day commuting and estimates that he probably lost 20% of his time on office chat-niceties. He also stated that all of his internal sales and purchasing teams were being more productive in their home working.
 
I predict a lot of vacant office space over the next 12-18 months. Companies are beginning to realise that the advantages of home working over costs of lease/rental are considerable. Even to the degree of staggered home working- office based so reduced floor space and admin requirements whilst maintaining the team work contact.
I was in conversation with an MD of electronics manufacturer last week who has realised that he has been wasting two hours a day commuting and estimates that he probably lost 20% of his time on office chat-niceties. He also stated that all of his internal sales and purchasing teams were being more productive in their home working.
I am in production,i knew things wouldn't go well when our Company,(Continental) started running out of office space whilst still trying to cut manufacturing Jobs.
Seems to me that the boot is on the other foot now.
Nowadays nearly all office workspaces are outsourceable.
Hands on production isn't,well not in my case anyway.
Not yet........................If not i'll probably train them.:oops:
 
I've always worked from home and the fact 2 Indian IT whizz whom rent out rooms at my mums place work from home as well proves it works but monitering productivity?
 
Most of us here on Arrse are either managers, or business owners, or if not military, then at least the type of people who have a certain amount of drive and incentive to do a job (ok, and then then there the few who seem to be from a different planet altogether....). Ergo, most of us can work from a home office.

I should have clarified my comment to say I was thinking more of the mass of employees who do not necessarily have these attributes, not least many of the younger or less experienced employees. Many of these need a place of work to achieve focus, to receive mentoring or to seek advice, or where the ability to instantly communicate with colleagues is core to enabling the work flow. Oh, and the inhibition to spending the day on Facebook or surfing the web from a manager looking over ones shoulder.

I also think that one of the dangers of a home-working revolution is that it may cause organisations to alter their scope of activities to those that can be accommodated by a sub-set of e-working key workers and managers, and that many less productive (in an e-environment) may be discarded together with the office space and those supporting workers (cleaners, security, delivery, office supply chains, etc).
Don't forget we're nearly all Ferrari drivers too.
 
I predict a lot of vacant office space over the next 12-18 months. Companies are beginning to realise that the advantages of home working over costs of lease/rental are considerable. Even to the degree of staggered home working- office based so reduced floor space and admin requirements whilst maintaining the team work contact.
I was in conversation with an MD of electronics manufacturer last week who has realised that he has been wasting two hours a day commuting and estimates that he probably lost 20% of his time on office chat-niceties. He also stated that all of his internal sales and purchasing teams were being more productive in their home working.
I run a retail company; I use DHL Global and DHL Express, 2 seperate companies under the same umbrella brand; everyone is yes, as said, working from home!
 
Big dial-in this morning and the guidance from our DG is that no one, with the exception of Duty personnel who work in the SCIFs, will return to the office before September at the earliest.
 

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