what happened to all the

When I was a kid growing up south of London in the 70s. There was a scrap meatal place that must of had an MOD contract to melt down all sorts of stuff .
The kids used to have a right old time of nicking anything they could from bazookas to bayonets and swapping them. I remember one day passing the head masters office and seeing a couple of Sten guns on his desk that some kids mum found under his bed . I had some parts of a Bren gun but have know idea what happened to them ..
Then you woke up from this dream.
 
If any of you have ever seen the film The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner from 1962 they had the kids in the borstal dismatling gas masks back to their component parts for recycling.
Whislt not authoritative, it probably shows just how long after the war they were still disposing of WWII equipment.
 

Ritch

LE
To our eternal shame a lot of stuff (ours and theirs) was tipped into the sea. There was too much kit to sort, sell and recycle. Easier to dump it somewhere out of sight.

There's an area out in the Irish Sea that has now become a particular bone of contention.
I heard the Yanks did something similar recently - filling shipping containers with kit and dumping it in the ocean etc. They even sometimes leave service dogs in theatre after they've pulled out.
 
I think that was more during the period when hostilities were underway and there was a pressing need for materials and cost was no object. Even then it's effectiveness was hit and miss. There was in the UK a massive and highly publicised metal salvaging campaign. Old pots and pans and the like were dutifully donated and collected. You can still see places in London and other cities where metal garden railings have been sawn off at the base for scrap and never replaced. It has since been revealed that much of this recovered material was unsuitable for most purposes or else processing it would have been too problematic. The whole campaign was largely for propaganda and morale purposes.

A lot of it was simply dumped
Lord Beaverbrookes metal
Drive.

although a failure in generating huge amounts of recyclable material, it was a propaganda coupe, and let the people know it was total war.
 
We still have one or two surviving Ammunition Examiners who cleared large stocks of munitions, they were spread out along hedgerows near departure points, it took years to dispose of.

I joined the trade in 1992 and was dealing with returned ammunition from Op Corporate.
 

bedended

War Hero
I think that was more during the period when hostilities were underway and there was a pressing need for materials and cost was no object. Even then it's effectiveness was hit and miss. There was in the UK a massive and highly publicised metal salvaging campaign. Old pots and pans and the like were dutifully donated and collected. You can still see places in London and other cities where metal garden railings have been sawn off at the base for scrap and never replaced. It has since been revealed that much of this recovered material was unsuitable for most purposes or else processing it would have been too problematic. The whole campaign was largely for propaganda and morale purposes.

A lot of it was simply dumped
Morning @Provost,
When I walk around my home town(North Wales). I still see low garden walls with stumps of the railings. A long deceased aunt told me as a kid, that she watched the council men remove them for the reason you stated.
 
Our Naval Service dumped vast quantities of war stock into the seas off Ireland, parallelling the work off Derry (U-boat disposal). A colleague, who enlisted in the late 70s, was detailed, along with his entire recruit platoon, to board one of our ships, which was loaded with WW 2 dated shells and SAA and weapons and they were thrown overboard into a dumping ground near Galley Head; .303 ammunition and weapons, 40mm Bofors rounds, 3.7 in AA shells, 4 in naval shells and time expired artillery charges among a host of other items. The crew had a "Mad Minute" shooting off hundreds of rounds and then throwing the weapons into the sea. Ammunition crates and containers were treated to a chop of an axe first.
 
We still have one or two surviving Ammunition Examiners who cleared large stocks of munitions, they were spread out along hedgerows near departure points, it took years to dispose of.

I joined the trade in 1992 and was dealing with returned ammunition from Op Corporate.
iirc ASofA used stuff the argies had gift aided on the dem ground, did they not also find a large amount of muntions in a shed that had just been forgotton about for years.
 

4(T)

LE
I think that was more during the period when hostilities were underway and there was a pressing need for materials and cost was no object. Even then it's effectiveness was hit and miss. There was in the UK a massive and highly publicised metal salvaging campaign. Old pots and pans and the like were dutifully donated and collected. You can still see places in London and other cities where metal garden railings have been sawn off at the base for scrap and never replaced. It has since been revealed that much of this recovered material was unsuitable for most purposes or else processing it would have been too problematic. The whole campaign was largely for propaganda and morale purposes.

A lot of it was simply dumped

I think it was all used - but just not for the sexy high profile projects mentioned in the publicity.

Even the poor quality cast iron that constituted a lot of those thousands of fences and railings had plenty of applications when simply smelted and recast - e.g. the airfields project (IIRC the biggest construction project in British history, and one of the biggest in the world) alone required thousands of drain covers, pipes, conduits, etc. Then you had - countless ship fittings, machine tool platforms, civil construction supplies, some railway structures and parts, etc and so on.
 
I heard the Yanks did something similar recently - filling shipping containers with kit and dumping it in the ocean etc. They even sometimes leave service dogs in theatre after they've pulled out.
The Aussies did a similar thing with their Tunnel search dogs in Vietnam.
My ref:- Trackers, The Untold Story of Australian Dogs of War. Peter Haran.
 

needlewaver

Old-Salt
We still have one or two surviving Ammunition Examiners who cleared large stocks of munitions, they were spread out along hedgerows near departure points, it took years to dispose of.

I joined the trade in 1992 and was dealing with returned ammunition from Op Corporate.
@dingerr, can I ask how Ammunition Examiners differ from Ammunition Technicians? Is it just the evolution of the trade, and advances in technology (similar to the Medical Assistant to Combat Medical Technician farce)? Or was it a different kettle of fish?
 
iirc ASofA used stuff the argies had gift aided on the dem ground, did they not also find a large amount of muntions in a shed that had just been forgotton about for years.
There are tech intelligence sheds at Kineton that hold various munitions for investigation. Foreign ammunition is brought back to the U.K. en masse.

Things do get left in sheds, but that’s often down to poor depot management. I’m not going to complain about that though as I always enjoyed sorting places out.
 
Forgot about this, Hegloland Island was blown in half by all the munitions placed on the island at the end of the second innings. I believe it was a mixture of German and Allied munitions not required.
Apparently it was a rather Big Bang!
 
@dingerr, can I ask how Ammunition Examiners differ from Ammunition Technicians? Is it just the evolution of the trade, and advances in technology (similar to the Medical Assistant to Combat Medical Technician farce)? Or was it a different kettle of fish?
Guided weapons make us technicians. We evolved from the AE.

1579293080995.jpeg


The AT badge was the first multicoloured badge in the Army. Someone probably moaned about it.

1579293167514.jpeg
 
No idea about the time frame mentioned but when we pulled out of Aden, an inordinate amount of stuff was sea dumped. Binos, watches, and all manner of stuff went, including vehicles and radio kit.
And some of the A/T mines left behind for the new Federation of South Arabia army mysteriously appeared in north-west Dhofar, in due course.
 

Mike Barton

War Hero
The Soviet bloc kept loads and issued them out to the likes of the Veitcong who were armed with MG 42s etc when it kicked off.
The British, albeit inadvertently, did the same thing in Singapore. In 1945 they paid fishermen to dump vast amounts of captured Japanese arms at sea, the chaps did as told, but not before informing (presumably for a price) Indonesian nationalists about the shallow parts of the sea they would be dumping it.

The Dutch weren't happy at all.
 

Mike Barton

War Hero
If any of you have ever seen the film The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner from 1962 they had the kids in the borstal dismatling gas masks back to their component parts for recycling.
Whislt not authoritative, it probably shows just how long after the war they were still disposing of WWII equipment.
Look at the pictures of the Battle of the Bogside from August 1969. Dozens of the rioters are wearing Grandad's gas mask brought down from the attic when the RUC started firing CS gas. I know we still had a gas mask in our house as late as the 1980s.

ETA: Iconic photo, the boy's gas mask is dated Oct 1941, not quite government approved recycling.

gas mask_0002.jpg
 
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Joker62

ADC
Book Reviewer
I think that was more during the period when hostilities were underway and there was a pressing need for materials and cost was no object. Even then it's effectiveness was hit and miss. There was in the UK a massive and highly publicised metal salvaging campaign. Old pots and pans and the like were dutifully donated and collected. You can still see places in London and other cities where metal garden railings have been sawn off at the base for scrap and never replaced. It has since been revealed that much of this recovered material was unsuitable for most purposes or else processing it would have been too problematic. The whole campaign was largely for propaganda and morale purposes.

A lot of it was simply dumped
There are also places in London, mainly council estates, where the old stretcher frames became part of the fencing.
1579321006657.png
 

Tyk

LE
But not an underwater branch sadly
That unit and its members are still subject to top secret, sneaky beaky restrictions, if you ever found out about it they would have to arrange for your unpleasant end, probably involving a mess tin in dire need of repair and a swimming pool.
 
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