what happened to all the

sirbhp

LE
Book Reviewer
captured kit from ww2, i mean uniforms , mess tins , documents stores etc all the general kit . I assume all the guns and ammo got melted down for scrap.
This question also applies to the gulf war etc . Is there a warehouse deep in darkest Nottingham that's filled with captured socks boots and shaving tackle ??
 
captured kit from ww2, i mean uniforms , mess tins , documents stores etc all the general kit . I assume all the guns and ammo got melted down for scrap.
This question also applies to the gulf war etc . Is there a warehouse deep in darkest Nottingham that's filled with captured socks boots and shaving tackle ??
To our eternal shame a lot of stuff (ours and theirs) was tipped into the sea. There was too much kit to sort, sell and recycle. Easier to dump it somewhere out of sight.

There's an area out in the Irish Sea that has now become a particular bone of contention.
 

4(T)

LE
captured kit from ww2, i mean uniforms , mess tins , documents stores etc all the general kit . I assume all the guns and ammo got melted down for scrap.
This question also applies to the gulf war etc . Is there a warehouse deep in darkest Nottingham that's filled with captured socks boots and shaving tackle ??
In WW1 and WW2 the major players all had very efficient salvage and recycling systems, and not just for metals. E.g. uniforms were shredded to make felt, mattress stuffing, packaging materials and the like. In WW1 we even collected materials like bone (presumably non-human!) and horsehair, and had it all shipped back to Britain for processing. Not sure what happened to boots, leather webbing and saddlery; presumably scrap leather also had an industrial use.
 
The Slough Trading Estate started life during WW1 as a massive military vehicle acceptance park. I believe that the end of hostilities came before it was completed. It continued thereafter as a military vehicle disposal site but was badly managed and was not a success. Somebody came along and made the government an offer they were reluctant to refuse and eventually it became the vast trading estate we know now.
 

ches

LE
In the early 80s as a young thruster, my bezzies Dad had an FAC, he used to know a bloke at Interarms in Mcr. I went with him & my bezzie into the place through the old roller shutter entrance that was on the arse face of the building away from the canal. IIRC it ramped down to the loading docks & i remember at the back of the storage area down there, there were racks of K98ks that were taken off the boxheads in Norway in 45. Figure I heard was something like 75000 of the things taken off the troops & from depots.
 
In WW1 and WW2 the major players all had very efficient salvage and recycling systems, and not just for metals. E.g. uniforms were shredded to make felt, mattress stuffing, packaging materials and the like. In WW1 we even collected materials like bone (presumably non-human!) and horsehair, and had it all shipped back to Britain for processing. Not sure what happened to boots, leather webbing and saddlery; presumably scrap leather also had an industrial use.

Indeed

 
In WW1 and WW2 the major players all had very efficient salvage and recycling systems, and not just for metals. E.g. uniforms were shredded to make felt, mattress stuffing, packaging materials and the like. In WW1 we even collected materials like bone (presumably non-human!) and horsehair, and had it all shipped back to Britain for processing. Not sure what happened to boots, leather webbing and saddlery; presumably scrap leather also had an industrial use.
I think that was more during the period when hostilities were underway and there was a pressing need for materials and cost was no object. Even then it's effectiveness was hit and miss. There was in the UK a massive and highly publicised metal salvaging campaign. Old pots and pans and the like were dutifully donated and collected. You can still see places in London and other cities where metal garden railings have been sawn off at the base for scrap and never replaced. It has since been revealed that much of this recovered material was unsuitable for most purposes or else processing it would have been too problematic. The whole campaign was largely for propaganda and morale purposes.

A lot of it was simply dumped
 
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The Soviet bloc kept loads and issued them out to the likes of the Veitcong who were armed with MG 42s etc when it kicked off.

If you have seen the German film Stalingrad from the 90s the uniforms were all originals that had been stored in the Czech republic during the cold war period.After the battle mag had a good article on it
 

old_fat_and_hairy

LE
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
In WW1 and WW2 the major players all had very efficient salvage and recycling systems, and not just for metals. E.g. uniforms were shredded to make felt, mattress stuffing, packaging materials and the like. In WW1 we even collected materials like bone (presumably non-human!) and horsehair, and had it all shipped back to Britain for processing. Not sure what happened to boots, leather webbing and saddlery; presumably scrap leather also had an industrial use.

They were issued to us who joined in the 1960s. Probably.
 

old_fat_and_hairy

LE
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
No idea about the time frame mentioned but when we pulled out of Aden, an inordinate amount of stuff was sea dumped. Binos, watches, and all manner of stuff went, including vehicles and radio kit.
 
Good example of Sea dumping, in the 90s a row of V/C Corsairs was found off the Queensland coast. All had folded wings and holes punched in fuselage and wings.
Who operated and dumped them, wasn’t established. But it was assumed it was the FAA.
 

Sttrory

Old-Salt
Just after ww1 there was a paddle boat sunk in the middle of round hey park lake in leeds. Only found after they drained the lake in the 90s I believe it was filled with rifles and grenades? Will try to find the link

My appogies the link says this
One of the most fascinating chapters in the lake's history came in the 1930s, when war prompted police to announce a firearms amnesty. Over 300 guns and ammunition were then, bizarrely, dumped in the middle of the lake at night as part of an official police operation. This caused issues in 1998 when the lake was drained, and officers had to patrol the area to ensure souvenir hunters did not retrieve any of the weapons. In a twist to the tale, an unexploded World War Two bomb was found soon after in a house in Seacroft, and it was believed that this had originally come from the drained lake.


 
In the early 80s as a young thruster, my bezzies Dad had an FAC, he used to know a bloke at Interarms in Mcr. I went with him & my bezzie into the place through the old roller shutter entrance that was on the arse face of the building away from the canal. IIRC it ramped down to the loading docks & i remember at the back of the storage area down there, there were racks of K98ks that were taken off the boxheads in Norway in 45. Figure I heard was something like 75000 of the things taken off the troops & from depots.
Ah Interarms . Manchesters own war stock in case we had to sort out the scousers.
 

mrboo

War Hero
When I was a kid growing up south of London in the 70s. There was a scrap meatal place that must of had an MOD contract to melt down all sorts of stuff .
The kids used to have a right old time of nicking anything they could from bazookas to bayonets and swapping them. I remember one day passing the head masters office and seeing a couple of Sten guns on his desk that some kids mum found under his bed . I had some parts of a Bren gun but have know idea what happened to them ..
 

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