What film have you just watched?

old_fat_and_hairy

LE
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
I've not seen the re-make, but I have seen the Hancock version; superb.

re-makes of films rarely work too well. As part of my history degree I did film, and we looked at 'Cape Fear', both the older one with Gregory Peck and Robert Mitchum and the newer one, with De Niro. The older one was far superior, with real tension and tremendous acting, as opposed to De Niro 'mugging'. Again, one just has to look at 'Get Carter' or 'The Italian Job', not to mention 'The Lavender Hill Mob' to see the folly of most "re imagini8ngs".
 
12 Angry Men (the 1957 version) is on Film 4 right now. One of the all-time greats and what a cast.

I also watched it again and agree with your comments .... on a much lighter note I later watched the " Minder " version with Arhtur Dayley as the Foreman of the Jury .... for those who may be interested linky ...

 
The Victors. George Peppard, George Hamilton and Robert Mitchum’s brother (who stands out like a bulldog’s b*ll*cks)!
Remember seeing a bit of it years and years ago, but this was the first time I had seen it all the way through.
Very good film. Seemed very honest. Not the usual Hollywood stereotype for the era. Wish there were more in that style.
 
The Victors. George Peppard, George Hamilton and Robert Mitchum’s brother (who stands out like a bulldog’s b*ll*cks)!
Remember seeing a bit of it years and years ago, but this was the first time I had seen it all the way through.
Very good film. Seemed very honest. Not the usual Hollywood stereotype for the era. Wish there were more in that style.
The end scene is basically a metaphor for the cold war.
 

old_fat_and_hairy

LE
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
The Victors. George Peppard, George Hamilton and Robert Mitchum’s brother (who stands out like a bulldog’s b*ll*cks)!
Remember seeing a bit of it years and years ago, but this was the first time I had seen it all the way through.
Very good film. Seemed very honest. Not the usual Hollywood stereotype for the era. Wish there were more in that style.
If that is the film I'm thinking of, there is a very poignant scene where someone (possibly a deserter ) is shot to the background tune of a melancholy version of 'Have yourself a Merry Little Christmas'
 
Critical Drinker sums it up best.

F**king Disney


Now I thought the people who remade Point Break (The Holy Movie) should have been thrown from a tall building (in true ISIS style for those who violate the Truth).

Fortunately, we know what should happen to those who screw up Dr Jones.

kali.gif
 
If that is the film I'm thinking of, there is a very poignant scene where someone (possibly a deserter ) is shot to the background tune of a melancholy version of 'Have yourself a Merry Little Christmas'
That's the one. There's several juxtapositions in the film and they work well. As I say, not your usual Hollywood production for that time.
ETA Just looked it up and it's a collection of stories from author Alexander Baron from his experiences in the British Army. The film depicts yank soldiers so as to appeal to the American audience. So that probably explains the film's uniqueness.
 
The Death of Stalin, courtesy of a purchase from Chili.com.

Steve Buscemi and Jason Isaacs are still the best bits of that film. Not 100 per cent historically accurate, but close enough for Comintern work.

Five TT-30 Tokarev pistol execution shots to the head out of five.
Jason Isaacs was superb as Zhukov
 
I watched it today for the first time ever. Can’t believe I made it to 51 without having seen it. I would love to see it on a stage. Absolutely superb.
How Green Was My Valley was on before it. Another good show.
Re How Green was my Valley

I agree it is a powerful film, particularly the closing sequence, 'Men like my father can never die...' but the film is a world removed from the book. The accents are hilarious but at least the choir was a genuine Welsh one.
 

old_fat_and_hairy

LE
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
That's the one. There's several juxtapositions in the film and they work well. As I say, not your usual Hollywood production for that time.
ETA Just looked it up and it's a collection of stories from author Alexander Baron from his experiences in the British Army. The film depicts yank soldiers so as to appeal to the American audience. So that probably explains the film's uniqueness.
It's a film that never really got the attention or merit it deserved. I'm not a great fan of Peppard but thought he was excellent in it. A very good film.
 
Jason Isaacs was superb as Zhukov

Further to your Post ..... now watching again ... again .... again ... " The Death of Stalin " ....every time so far I have spotted something not seen earlier .
 
That's the one. There's several juxtapositions in the film and they work well. As I say, not your usual Hollywood production for that time.
ETA Just looked it up and it's a collection of stories from author Alexander Baron from his experiences in the British Army. The film depicts yank soldiers so as to appeal to the American audience. So that probably explains the film's uniqueness.

Alexander Baron also wrote "From the City, From the Plough", about the troops of a thinly fictionalised British infantry battalion throughout 1944. Republished as part of the IWM Wartime Classics. Highly recommended.
 
It's a film that never really got the attention or merit it deserved. I'm not a great fan of Peppard but thought he was excellent in it. A very good film.

It's an incredible scene. The entourage lead-out; Padre, and senior officer with escorts to the prisoner. The camera pans back, to show the winter starkness of the execution ground with the surrounding phalanxes of troops. The ceremony of the blindfold, the subsequent verification of the death, and the march-off of the troops across the snow.

I thought the execution scene in 'Paths of Glory' was emotional, but goodness, The Victors version to that Christmas tune was of another level again.
 
I watched this last night and thoroughly recommend it:


As a review from IMDb puts it: A refreshing black comedy starring some of Australia's finest. In the same way that Lock Stock and 2 Smoking Barrels captured the funny side of London gangsters, Two Hands rips through the Sydney underworld. It wouldn't be so funny if it wasn't so close to the bone. Best of all, it is just 1:33 long.

Worthy of a firm 8.5 mullets of of ten.

E2A: I originally watched it when it was just released, because one of 'my' Army Reservists had a role.
 
From The Victors
The drunken troops mistaken for exhausted from aroute march scene is really accurate. Shooting the dog shows how far they came emotionally.
 

old_fat_and_hairy

LE
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
It's an incredible scene. The entourage lead-out; Padre, and senior officer with escorts to the prisoner. The camera pans back, to show the winter starkness of the execution ground with the surrounding phalanxes of troops. The ceremony of the blindfold, the subsequent verification of the death, and the march-off of the troops across the snow.

I thought the execution scene in 'Paths of Glory' was emotional, but goodness, The Victors version to that Christmas tune was of another level again.
Indeed. So much so that I can remember little else of the film, not having watched it in many years, but that particular scene has stayed with me. Probably the best anti-war moment of any film, and I include 'All Quiet.......' and 'Paths of Glory' in that.
As you say, the sheer starkness, the reaction - or lack of - from the troops and the most inappropriate music elevate the shot to what I would consider greatness. A scene that in any poll of best scenes ( whatever the term) would rank with Welles in 'Citizen Kane' and in 'The Third Man'
 

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