What film have you just watched?

PFGEN

GCM
Quite, but how would a Producer make the film that he wants when ...
At least 30% of all actors in secondary and more minor roles are from at least two of the following underrepresented groups:
• Women
• Racial or ethnic group
• LGBTQ+
• People with cognitive or physical disabilities, or who are deaf or hard of hearing
?

How would that work with a remake of, say, 'The Cruel Sea', or 'Battle of the River Plate'? And of course, in such a film;

At least one of the lead actors or significant supporting actors is from an underrepresented racial or ethnic group.
• Asian
• Hispanic/Latinx
• Black/African American
• Indigenous/Native American/Alaskan Native
• Middle Eastern/North African
• Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander
• Other underrepresented race or ethnicity


I foresee difficulties with the makers' freedom to produce a product of quality, in their vision of the end result. This will not work out well, unless the producers are ready to lose income by angering their audiences. Consider Julius Caesar or Macbeth so Quota'd up; those are tragedies, not farces.
As far as I'm concerned the Oscars lost their gloss a while back. Ever since Saving Private Ryan lost out to Shakespeare in Love in the best picture category. Apparently the wankstain had something to do with that.

I'm guessing that producers of repute will forget about the Oscars and carry on producing excellent films. Those that win the inclusivity award through box ticking will end up going straight to the DVD bargain bin at Lidl a month after the awards.
 

HCL

Old-Salt
Found this by accident, totally random, and watched both part 1 and part 2 back to back, first time since nineteen mumble munble. And this time I satyed awake all the way through which meant I didn't have to double round the "kinema" 20 times when my section Coroporal caught me snoozing during my first viewing.



Proper BLACK boots, puttees, shit webbing and THAT rifle. Them werre the days.
 

exspy

LE
Quite, but how would a Producer make the film that he wants when ...
At least 30% of all actors in secondary and more minor roles are from at least two of the following underrepresented groups:
• Women
• Racial or ethnic group
• LGBTQ+
• People with cognitive or physical disabilities, or who are deaf or hard of hearing
?

How would that work with a remake of, say, 'The Cruel Sea', or 'Battle of the River Plate'? And of course, in such a film;

At least one of the lead actors or significant supporting actors is from an underrepresented racial or ethnic group.
• Asian
• Hispanic/Latinx
• Black/African American
• Indigenous/Native American/Alaskan Native
• Middle Eastern/North African
• Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander
• Other underrepresented race or ethnicity


I foresee difficulties with the makers' freedom to produce a product of quality, in their vision of the end result. This will not work out well, unless the producers are ready to lose income by angering their audiences. Consider Julius Caesar or Macbeth so Quota'd up; those are tragedies, not farces.
Remake Zulu. Job jobbed.
 
......'Battle of the River Plate'? And of course, in such a film;

At least one of the lead actors or significant supporting actors is from an underrepresented racial or ethnic group.
• Asian
• Hispanic/Latinx
• Black/African American
• Indigenous/Native American/Alaskan Native
• Middle Eastern/North African
• Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander
• Other underrepresented race or ethnicity
To be fair, Christopher Lee plays an Uraguayan in that.
 

NSP

LE
Quite, but how would a Producer make the film that he wants when ...
At least 30% of all actors in secondary and more minor roles are from at least two of the following underrepresented groups:
• Women
• Racial or ethnic group
• LGBTQ+
• People with cognitive or physical disabilities, or who are deaf or hard of hearing
?

How would that work with a remake of, say, 'The Cruel Sea', or 'Battle of the River Plate'? And of course, in such a film;

At least one of the lead actors or significant supporting actors is from an underrepresented racial or ethnic group.
• Asian
• Hispanic/Latinx
• Black/African American
• Indigenous/Native American/Alaskan Native
• Middle Eastern/North African
• Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander
• Other underrepresented race or ethnicity


I foresee difficulties with the makers' freedom to produce a product of quality, in their vision of the end result. This will not work out well, unless the producers are ready to lose income by angering their audiences. Consider Julius Caesar or Macbeth so Quota'd up; those are tragedies, not farces.
Or the recently-discussed Greyhound, where there is only one woman in a bit part and the only black roles are menial ones.

Because it is set during WWII and about an Atlantic convoy escort where there were no women and the only role open to non-whites in the featured navy at the time was as stewards and mess-boys.

About the only factually accurate thing in U-571 is that the steward could step into a watch-keeping role because, even then, the USN recognised that every duty station on a sub' needed to know the basics of all other duty stations due to the unique nature of sub' ops and so the only way a black man could get any sort of trade training was to join the submarine branch of the USN.
 
Quite, but how would a Producer make the film that he wants when ...
At least 30% of all actors in secondary and more minor roles are from at least two of the following underrepresented groups:
• Women
• Racial or ethnic group
• LGBTQ+
• People with cognitive or physical disabilities, or who are deaf or hard of hearing
?

How would that work with a remake of, say, 'The Cruel Sea', or 'Battle of the River Plate'? And of course, in such a film;

At least one of the lead actors or significant supporting actors is from an underrepresented racial or ethnic group.
• Asian
• Hispanic/Latinx
• Black/African American
• Indigenous/Native American/Alaskan Native
• Middle Eastern/North African
• Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander
• Other underrepresented race or ethnicity


I foresee difficulties with the makers' freedom to produce a product of quality, in their vision of the end result. This will not work out well, unless the producers are ready to lose income by angering their audiences. Consider Julius Caesar or Macbeth so Quota'd up; those are tragedies, not farces.
I wonder if more science fiction films will be made?
 
I wonder if more science fiction films will be made?
Have no doubt about it. Science fiction films of recent years have complied with the Quota system rigorously, particularly in those parts for People with cognitive or physical disabilities. In 'Life' there's a short-sighted black character on the Space station who needs a wheelchair, and pretty well all of the roles appear to be cognitively impaired, particularly in 'decision-making processes'. Maybe the tension of the inevitable looming catastrophe demands it.
 
Having quite enjoyed the two series of False Flag, I was attracted by the film Foxtrot, which I've just finished watching. It is an Israeli/French/German/Swiss production.

download (1).jpg


Synopsis: Michael and Dafna experience gut-wrenching grief when army officials show up at their home to announce the death of their son Jonathan. Michael becomes increasingly frustrated by overzealous mourning relatives and well-meaning army bureaucrats. While his sedated wife rests, Michael spirals into a whirlwind of anger only to experience one of life's unfathomable twists - a twist that can only be rivaled by the surreal military experiences of his son.

My recommendation: if you are not in a wrist-slashing mood before watching, you will be by the end. And I have serious issues with the siting of the GPMG at the VCP. Just don't watch. Please.
 

syrup

LE
Having quite enjoyed the two series of False Flag, I was attracted by the film Foxtrot, which I've just finished watching. It is an Israeli/French/German/Swiss production.

View attachment 504455

Synopsis: Michael and Dafna experience gut-wrenching grief when army officials show up at their home to announce the death of their son Jonathan. Michael becomes increasingly frustrated by overzealous mourning relatives and well-meaning army bureaucrats. While his sedated wife rests, Michael spirals into a whirlwind of anger only to experience one of life's unfathomable twists - a twist that can only be rivaled by the surreal military experiences of his son.

My recommendation: if you are not in a wrist-slashing mood before watching, you will be by the end. And I have serious issues with the siting of the GPMG at the VCP. Just don't watch. Please.

On a similar vein I can recommend Last Flag Flying
Steve Carrell reunited with 2 fellow Vietnam Veteran Marines to escort the body of his son a Marine after he is killed in Iraq.
A decent film with a good cast and some funny and sad moments plus a nice little twist
 
Last night Monday 13 September 2020. Freeview.

We Were Soldiers is a 2002 American war film directed by Randall Wallace and starring Mel Gibson. Based on the book We Were Soldiers Once… and Young (1992) by Lieutenant General (Ret.) Hal Moore and reporter Joseph L. Galloway, it dramatizes the Battle of Ia Drang on November 14, 1965.

We Were Soldiers - Wikipedia

1600177152911.png


Well, I am a little surprised !!

I had anticipated that the film must have been produced, and/or directed, by Mel Gibson . . . such were the long, lingering, TORTUOUS, shots of “the Star”, in almost any/every scenario. They were all somewhat of a distraction, and contributed to an unfortunate element of fantasy . . . particularly of him standing up in the middle of a fierce fire-fight, whilst everyone else around him is getting shot/slaughtered!

The film did however, serve to record (for posterity), the formation, and first active deployment of the “Air Cav” . . . with an interesting back-story of the “Corps” of Officers’ wives left behind, and how they dealt with life.

I must also be one of the most graphic pictorial display of war time, fire-fight, blood-letting. Before re-joining after EVERY commercial-break, we were warned again, of the extreme violence.

I have never been there, never experienced such carnage, but I am prepared to accept the scenes were not an exaggeration. Similarly, the “waves” of attacking North Vietnamese soldiers, was sobering.
 
Last edited:

Arte_et_Marte

ADC
Moderator
There have been a few threads on here where the subject matter is the death penalty.
Tonight, without knowing anything about this particular film I watched a rather gruesome tale of how the death penalty was carried out in S Africa.
Steve Coogan as you have never seen him before as a defence barrister and a rather convincing role he played.
Based on true events (not a true story) from 1987, the film Shepherds and Butchers, available on Netflix.
All I can say after watching it , it is not for the faint hearted.
There have been many comments on the site, on this very thread, about this film, from way back in 2017. All of them very good reviews.

@Bile-Spewer was one of the first to comment.

Shepherds and Butchers
 

skeetstar

Old-Salt
Last night Monday 13 September 2020. Freeview.

We Were Soldiers is a 2002 American war film directed by Randall Wallace and starring Mel Gibson. Based on the book We Were Soldiers Once… and Young (1992) by Lieutenant General (Ret.) Hal Moore and reporter Joseph L. Galloway, it dramatizes the Battle of Ia Drang on November 14, 1965.

We Were Soldiers - Wikipedia

View attachment 504673

Well, I am a little surprised !!

I had anticipated that the film must have been produced, and/or directed, by Mel Gibson . . . such were the long, lingering, TORTUOUS, shots of “the Star”, in almost any/every scenario. They were all somewhat of a distraction, and contributed somewhat to an unfortunate element of fantasy . . . particularly of him standing up in the middle of a fierce fire-fight, whilst everyone else around him is getting shot/slaughtered!

The film did however, serve to record (for posterity), the formation, and first active deployment of the “Air Cav” . . . with an interesting back-story of the “Corps” of Officers’ wives left behind, and how they dealt with life.

I must also be one of the most graphic pictorial display of war time, fire-fight, blood-letting. Before re-joining after EVERY commercial-break, we were warned again, of the extreme violence.

I have never been there, never experienced such carnage, but I am prepared to accept the scenes were not an exaggeration. Similarly, the “waves” of attacking North Vietnamese soldiers, was sobering.
Seen it a couple of times, thought it was a movie made for American teen agers.. shoot up the Commies with those rifles that have thousand round magazines.
One part that was utterly risible (unless I got it wrong) - the black woman, esp and then other women were getting notices in real time that their husbands were dead, ..whilst the battle was still going on!

Did like the fact that they tried ti give it a bit of context with the French soldiers at the beginning, though.
 
TESLA 2020.

Tells the tale of Nicola Tesla who apparently was the silent type of chap.

This is perfectly portrayed in the film by what seems like 500,000 scenes of a silent brooding Ethan Hawke saying absolutely dick all. To combat this dullness the director has tried to electrify the viewer by throwing in a bunch of surreal wackiness.

This film falls flat quicker than a Pound Store battery.
 
TESLA 2020.

Tells the tale of Nicola Tesla who apparently was the silent type of chap.

This is perfectly portrayed in the film by what seems like 500,000 scenes of a silent brooding Ethan Hawke saying absolutely dick all. To combat this dullness the director has tried to electrify the viewer by throwing in a bunch of surreal wackiness.

This film falls flat quicker than a Pound Store battery.
6/10 for puns!! ;) .
 

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