What film have you just watched?

NSP

LE
On Netflix, Danger Close. Film based on an incident(s) during the Vietnam War in 1966 The Battle for Long Tan when Aus/Nz troops went up against a far superior number of VC. Plenty of action and annoying incompetance of HQ top officers. What I couldn't get my head round was the use(if factual)of different weapons/calbre used by blokes in the same unit. I ended up about half way through doing the old fast forward thing as it was pretty obvious how things would pan out. Worth a look but don't expect an epic blockbuster.
Having watched The Odd Angry Shot I was puzzled by the number of M-16s on show, given that the Aussie forces were a primary SLR (Lithgow variant) user at the time and all the way forward until 1988 when the licence-built Steyr AUG (the "AusSteyr") replaced it. In TOAS the guy lugging the radio about has the M-16, ostensibly as a lighter weapon with lighter ammo to offset the load of the radio and batteries on top of his personal field kit, and the rest have the SLR or, if the squad gunner, an MG. I.e. One M-16 per platoon.

In DC there's several Owen SMGs in play, too.

Edit to add: in the 1985 Screen 2 drama "Contact" by Alan Clarke (ostensibly a fictionalised account of his own experiences on active service in Northern Ireland) the radioman also carries an M-16 albeit with an M203 attached - so could have been to give the platoon a grenade launcher without the operator of same being diffy a personal long weapon (i.e. in lieu of the M-79) whilst allowing the operator a lighter load against the weight of the comms kit? Also to give the platoon a light weapon capable of automatic fire to supplement the MG (also seen in the drama) for, say, when clearing a suspect building? In the drama the platoon patrols open country and catches suspected terrorists moving weapons from a remote farmhouse to a car so the M-16 would have been useful for securing the house, with the selector on auto, perhaps...? Apart from the MG gunner and the radioman everyone else appears to have the SLR - no Sterlings in sight.
 
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The Revenant - decidedly average. Great scenery but that’s about it.
I liked its first iteration with Richard Harris (As Zach Bass), John Houston, and Percy Herbert, Norman Rossington

"Man in the wilderness" 1971

 

Poppycock

Old-Salt
Watched this on amazon prime last night - had huge potential for hollywood cheese but turned out to be an excellent film. Combines the hollywood action and a love interest with outstanding realism (getting farted in the face by your bunk mate) and some challenging portrayals of the conflict / our mission

 

Auld-Yin

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Watched it last night. What a tool the headshed was - "Turn your column around and come and get me." "Sir, the lads are in the shit and time is of the essence." "Turn your column around and come and get me."

Later, "Hold there and wait for me to catch up." "Sir, the lads are on their uppers and time is even more of the essence." "Hold there and wait for me."

Praise be for junior officers not slaved to the rulebook, who can think, "Fuck you (sir!)," and translate the order each time to one APC turning around/waiting whilst the rest of the column moves up and comes in with the HMGs and reinforcements, and not a moment too soon.

If that's an accurate retelling then we're back to WWI "lions/donkeys" territory.
You should read about the battle, the film took a bit of licence in the making.

Major Smith got an MC for that although he was put forward for a DSO. Four decades later and the Aussie government upped the award to their new Star of Gallantry, an award just below VC in standing.
 

Auld-Yin

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The Revenant - decidedly average. Great scenery but that’s about it.
I saw that in the cinema and don't think I would like it on TV. It needs a huge screen to bring out the scenery, which is a major factor in the film. IMO.
 
Having watched The Odd Angry Shot I was puzzled by the number of M-16s on show, given that the Aussie forces were a primary FAL (Lithgow variant) user at the time and all the way forward until 1988 when the licence-built Steyr AUG (the "AusSteyr") replaced it. In TOAS the guy lugging the radio about has the M-16, ostensibly as a lighter weapon with lighter ammo to offset the load of the radio and batteries on top of his personal field kit, and the rest have the FAL or, if the squad gunner, an MG. I.e. One M-16 per platoon.

In DC there's several Owen SMGs in play, too.

Edit to add: in the 1985 Screen 2 drama "Contact" by Alan Clarke (ostensibly a fictionalised account of his own experiences on active service in Northern Ireland) the radioman also carries an M-16 albeit with an M203 attached - so could have been to give the platoon a grenade launcher without the operator of same being diffy a personal long weapon (i.e. in lieu of the M-79) whilst allowing the operator a lighter load against the weight of the comms kit? Also to give the platoon a light weapon capable of automatic fire to supplement the MG (also seen in the drama) for, say, when clearing a suspect building? In the drama the platoon patrols open country and catches suspected terrorists moving weapons from a remote farmhouse to a car so the M-16 would have been useful for securing the house, with the selector on auto, perhaps...? Apart from the MG gunner and the radioman everyone else appears to have the SLR - no Sterlings in sight.
Long Tan was reasonably early in the Aussies deployment, so Owens were still quite common.
As for the M203 in 'Contact', we certainly had them when we went to S. Armagh in 1988. Originally we had one M79 per brick, but these were withdrawn during pre training. Replaced by one M203 per 12 man multiple, although a few of us were also trained on it. Sterlings were used in the cities but would have been next to useless on the border (IMHO).
 

TamH70

MIA
The Revenant - decidedly average. Great scenery but that’s about it.
Yeah, the hype for that film put me off, and nothing I've read about it since makes it worth a watch as far as I'm concerned.

Still, got Di Caprio his Oscar, so there's that, I suppose...
 

offog

LE
On Netflix, Danger Close. Film based on an incident(s) during the Vietnam War in 1966 The Battle for Long Tan when Aus/Nz troops went up against a far superior number of VC. Plenty of action and annoying incompetance of HQ top officers. What I couldn't get my head round was the use(if factual)of different weapons/calbre used by blokes in the same unit. I ended up about half way through doing the old fast forward thing as it was pretty obvious how things would pan out. Worth a look but don't expect an epic blockbuster.
The AR15 was widely used in Malaya as a replacement for SMGs so it is very possible that the RAR still had them on issue.
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The film has been a long time in coming and has had a number of false starts. It is clear that it is not a Hollywood block buster. Compared to many American films it was as accurate as it could be. The battery in defence and the use of pack howitzers was keeping with the time although I am not sure of layout of the gun position. The resup by air was also mentioned in the book and the problems of ammo turning up in boxes was taken care of in future resup so that the troop had ready ammo. Fire mission Regt was a bit weak and I think they were supported by heavy US guns.

It's the little things like bags on handsets to stop the water, fire discipline and lack of pray and spray. Although not fixing of bayonets was strange as one soldier put it when in the FUP when the order to change mags fix bayonets came down you knew it was getting real. But this may have been because the film crew did not have any SLR bayonets.

I watched it last night and enjoyed it.
 

KnockKnock

On ROPS
On ROPs
Just too hot to sleep last night so around 1 pm, we watched 'Beat Girl' b/w 1960, also known in US as 'Wild for Kicks'. Christopher Lee, Noelle Adams, David Farr, Shirley Anne Fields, and Adam Faith, who whilst singing to guitar, tells another teenager to move on with the memorable line:-"If you want to fight- go join the Army, that's the place for squares !!'
Some choice street scenes of 1960s London. Also, Oliver Reed cast as 'Plaid Shirt', and Norman Mitchell as 'Doorman', Oliver Reed (Bill Sykes) and Norman Mitchell (arresting constable), both later had these main roles in the film version of 'Oliver'.
Once again, I was very taken with the car a 1936 Aston Martin 1.5Lt MK11 4 seater, with cycle type wings, owned it appeared, as a 'run about' by one of the male teenagers. Yes!..... again...'I want that car'!!!
 

KnockKnock

On ROPS
On ROPs
The AR15 was widely used in Malaya as a replacement for SMGs so it is very possible that the RAR still had them on issue.
View attachment 495714

The film has been a long time in coming and has had a number of false starts. It is clear that it is not a Hollywood block buster. Compared to many American films it was as accurate as it could be. The battery in defence and the use of pack howitzers was keeping with the time although I am not sure of layout of the gun position. The resup by air was also mentioned in the book and the problems of ammo turning up in boxes was taken care of in future resup so that the troop had ready ammo. Fire mission Regt was a bit weak and I think they were supported by heavy US guns.

It's the little things like bags on handsets to stop the water, fire discipline and lack of pray and spray. Although not fixing of bayonets was strange as one soldier put it when in the FUP when the order to change mags fix bayonets came down you knew it was getting real. But this may have been because the film crew did not have any SLR bayonets.

I watched it last night and enjoyed it.
In Malaya Emergency, was only ever issued with a Lee Enfield, once did manage to get issued with a revolver (probably a Webley) so much less to lug about along with kit for a long train journey.
 
The AR15 was widely used in Malaya as a replacement for SMGs so it is very possible that the RAR still had them on issue.
View attachment 495714

The film has been a long time in coming and has had a number of false starts. It is clear that it is not a Hollywood block buster. Compared to many American films it was as accurate as it could be. The battery in defence and the use of pack howitzers was keeping with the time although I am not sure of layout of the gun position. The resup by air was also mentioned in the book and the problems of ammo turning up in boxes was taken care of in future resup so that the troop had ready ammo. Fire mission Regt was a bit weak and I think they were supported by heavy US guns.

It's the little things like bags on handsets to stop the water, fire discipline and lack of pray and spray. Although not fixing of bayonets was strange as one soldier put it when in the FUP when the order to change mags fix bayonets came down you knew it was getting real. But this may have been because the film crew did not have any SLR bayonets.

I watched it last night and enjoyed it.
Borneo for the Indonesian Confrontation, not Malaya.
 

KnockKnock

On ROPS
On ROPs
Sorry, I was referring to the campaigns. I just refer to them as the Malayan Campaign, then later, Borneo, and that the AR15 was used in the latter.
That's the whole reason, why I respond to posts about the Malayan Emergency (pre Independence), I find the PJM medal is becoming increasingly seen as a medal including service in Malaya before August 1957.
 
Danger Close, pretty much agree with the comments above. Enjoyable and interesting especially from a Resup point of view. That and not moving if they lost comms:
 
Watched "Hamilton" last night.
Not terrible, not great, basically a three hour history lesson with songs
 

KnockKnock

On ROPS
On ROPs
Afternoon film today....' A prize of Arms' b/w 1962 screened on Sony Movies Action.
Stanley Baker, Patrick Magee (RSM Hicks)( shouted like the real thing), Tom Bell, Fulton Mackay, Helmut Schmit.
Set at the time of UK troop movement and an army payroll heist during the Suez Crisis (another 'war' given an Emergency or Crisis title). Tension throughout and has you hoping they get away with it.
 
Afternoon film today....' A prize of Arms' b/w 1962 screened on Sony Movies Action.
Stanley Baker, Patrick Magee (RSM Hicks)( shouted like the real thing), Tom Bell, Fulton Mackay, Helmut Schmit.
Set at the time of UK troop movement and an army payroll heist during the Suez Crisis (another 'war' given an Emergency or Crisis title). Tension throughout and has you hoping they get away with it.
Second time that film has had " glowing reviews " on ARRSE in recent months ... I shall be checking the schedules to try and watch it next time it is to be shown .
 

skid2

LE
Book Reviewer
You should watch "Rio Bravo" next - the Howard Hawks film that he specifically directed as an attack on that movie as he (and John Wayne, and the rest of the R.B. cast) utterly detested just about every minute of it. The Wikipedia page is just a useful primer on how much, but there is a lot of other stuff on the 'Net about it.

edited to add:

Oh yeah, and the songs in the film are fantastic, particularly this one with Ricky Nelson and Dean the man Martin:


It's the single greatest summation of the Western Myth ever put to audio and celluloid.
3 amigos does something similar
 

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