What film have you just watched?

I bought a Bluray copy of the movie “The First Man”, which was purportedly the story of the first moon landing told from Neil Armstrong’s perspective. I was rather disappointed in it however, as it depicts Neil Armstrong as rather a dull dog not prone to showing much emotion at all. You would think that a guy who had had the opportunity to travel to the moon (something that had never been done before) and come back alive at the end, would have had more to say about the experience. Apparently not if you believe the story line as put forward in this movie.

It was shot from the inside of the cabin too, in whatever vehicle that Neil Armstrong was riding in, be it the cockpit of the X-15 rocket plane, Gemini 8, the Flying Bedstead trainer, or Apollo 11. Not much of a view of outside surroundings and a darkly lit interior jumble of control panels and flashing lights. It wasn’t impressive as the Tom Hanks miniseries, “From The Earth to the Moon” (1998_) was, and didn’t show much of early space hardware that NASA spent so much money on developing (and that Tom Hanks showcased in the miniseries).

The movie starts with a flight that Neil Armstrong had made in the X-15 rocket plane in the late 1950s or very early 1960s. He had apparently driven the X-15 to such a height that he was above the atmosphere, or most of it, and there was a very real risk of him being unable to return to the Earth as he would bounce off the atmosphere if he attempted a re-entry. He figured a way out of his dilemma however by using jets of gas vented to the outside that forced his plane into a steep dive to a lower altitude where his flying controls would work again. When he got back down on the ground again, the most he could muster to say about his near-death experience was “I’m alright.” Test pilots are supposed to have nerves of steel and quick to plan ways to get out of difficult situations, but it beggars belief that they wouldn’t manage at least one wipe of a sweaty brow and managing to exhale a loud “Whew!” after a particularly harrowing experience.

I don't know. Maybe Neil Armstrong was dull as ditchwater and not demonstrative in real life; I never met the man, but it beggers belief that he could have been so cold and stone-like as exhibited in this movie.
I know what you mean but (I think) its not really an "astronaut" film its a drama about an intoverted guy who has lost his daughter and happens to have an unusual job. He is certainly nowhere near Tom Hanks Jim Lovell, explaining how the mission will proceed to his son and describing the LEM as a "spidery looking guy".

How much has been written in and out is a subject I'd like to see addressed. For instance, after the "family meeting" when the kids go off to bed the eldest boy solemnly shakes his Fathers hand as if to say "I'll do my best to be the man of the house if you don't come back." Its one of the few moments where Armstrong is shown to be unsettled. I have read somwhere that the son has subsequently said that he had no doubts at any stage his Dad would come back so I wonder how much that scene is based in reality.

I know what you mean about stuff being dark and jumbled but there are moments which are just beautiful. When I saw the point of view shot of the "air molecule" leaving the LEM as they opened the hatch I wished I gone to an IMAX cinema. Equally the shot of Ed White walking back to his house across the darkened road with the stationary childs swing hanging from the tree looks like it was animated by Disney in the "Snow White" era.
 
I bought a Bluray copy of the movie “The First Man”, which was purportedly the story of the first moon landing told from Neil Armstrong’s perspective. I was rather disappointed in it however, as it depicts Neil Armstrong as rather a dull dog not prone to showing much emotion at all. You would think that a guy who had had the opportunity to travel to the moon (something that had never been done before) and come back alive at the end, would have had more to say about the experience. Apparently not if you believe the story line as put forward in this movie.

It was shot from the inside of the cabin too, in whatever vehicle that Neil Armstrong was riding in, be it the cockpit of the X-15 rocket plane, Gemini 8, the Flying Bedstead trainer, or Apollo 11. Not much of a view of outside surroundings and a darkly lit interior jumble of control panels and flashing lights. It wasn’t impressive as the Tom Hanks miniseries, “From The Earth to the Moon” (1998_) was, and didn’t show much of early space hardware that NASA spent so much money on developing (and that Tom Hanks showcased in the miniseries).

The movie starts with a flight that Neil Armstrong had made in the X-15 rocket plane in the late 1950s or very early 1960s. He had apparently driven the X-15 to such a height that he was above the atmosphere, or most of it, and there was a very real risk of him being unable to return to the Earth as he would bounce off the atmosphere if he attempted a re-entry. He figured a way out of his dilemma however by using jets of gas vented to the outside that forced his plane into a steep dive to a lower altitude where his flying controls would work again. When he got back down on the ground again, the most he could muster to say about his near-death experience was “I’m alright.” Test pilots are supposed to have nerves of steel and quick to plan ways to get out of difficult situations, but it beggars belief that they wouldn’t manage at least one wipe of a sweaty brow and managing to exhale a loud “Whew!” after a particularly harrowing experience.

I don't know. Maybe Neil Armstrong was dull as ditchwater and not demonstrative in real life; I never met the man, but it beggers belief that he could have been so cold and stone-like as exhibited in this movie.
I haven't seen the film. However in real life Armstrong was quite reserved. He was selected to be the first man on the moon precisely because he had no ego, unlike Aldrin who would later suffer from clinical depression and alcoholism. Armstrong was of Border Reiver stock, and seemed to inherit their stoicism.
 
I haven't seen the film. However in real life Armstrong was quite reserved. He was selected to be the first man on the moon precisely because he had no ego, unlike Aldrin who would later suffer from clinical depression and alcoholism. Armstrong was of Border Reiver stock, and seemed to inherit their stoicism.
Frae Ballymena hi!

Its interesting watching his later TV interviews. All interviews are performances but his are visibly like a performance.
 

NSP

LE
Den of Thieves on Netflix. Not bad, despite Gerard Butler chewing the scenery,
 
I’ve just watched aftermath. Basically a story of love and loss, played out through the characters of a British officer and his wife who are part of the occupation forces and the German family they are billeted with. Set in Hamburg five months after the end of WW2. Keira Knightley, Alexander Skarsgard and Jason Clarke play the lead roles.
Its ok and the portrayal of bomb flattened Hamburg is fairly good. However, it’s the small details that niggle, A full Colonel and a Captain who’d seen the most modest war service would have had at least a couple of medal ribbons on their uniforms.
I‘m not sure there would have been many dinner parties, given the parlous state of food supplies and shattered German infrastructure so soon after the war had ended.
Also, German partisans attacking British troops? Most records suggest that the werewolf thing was a myth with the German populace being more interested in finding enough food to survive. Having said that, I’ve seen contemporary pictures of allied jeeps with a device built onto them for cutting wire that might have been strung across roads.
I once worked with a chap who’d served with the Scots guards during this time period in Germany. He had some great dit’s. The nearest he came to being attacked by the populace was when he and his mate were in the town visiting a couple of Frauleins. After leaving the ladies they were cornered by a group of unimpressed German males. The expedient of removing their webbing belts, wrapping them around their fists and standing back to back was apparently enough to defuse the situation.
 
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I’ve just watched aftermath. Basically a story of love and loss, played out through the characters of a British officer and his wife who are part of the occupation forces and the German family they are billeted with. Set in Hamburg five months after the end of WW2. Keira Knightley, Alexander Skarsgard and Jason Clarke play the lead roles.
Its ok and the portrayal of bomb flattened Hamburg is fairly good. However, it’s the small details that niggle, A full Colonel and a Captain who’d seen the most modest war service would have had at least a couple of medal ribbons on their uniforms.
I‘m not sure there would have been many dinner parties, given the parlous state of food supplies and shattered German infrastructure so soon after the war had ended.
Also, German partisans attacking British troops? Most records suggest that the werewolf thing was a myth with the German populace being more interested in finding enough food to survive. Having said that, I’ve seen contemporary pictures of allied jeeps with a device built onto them for cutting wire that might have been strung across roads.
I once worked with a chap who’d served with the Scots guards during this time period in Germany. He had some great dit’s. The nearest he came to being attacked by the populace was when he and his mate were in the town visiting a couple of Frauleins. After leaving the ladies they were cornered by a group of unimpressed German males. The expedient of removing their webbing belts, wrapping them around their fists and standing back to back was apparently enough to defuse the situation.
Would an officer (or anyone) be married accompanied only five months after the end of the war?
 

NSP

LE
Downing Street Siege on Netflix. Jesus wept!! What a load of bollox from the start, when "Major" Lowe walks into the boardroom with corporal's stripes on his sleeves and throws up a gauche US-style salute. With his cap under his arm. And unshaven. Later there is a "lootenant" colonel with a majors crown on each shoulder.

And it goes downhill from there. I've a sneaking suspicion I've seen it before a few years ago, along with the preceding "installment" referenced in the preamble.

That was shite, too.
 
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The League of Gentlemen.
Seen it several times, but happy to watch it again. Apart from the Army stuff it is a good yarn, and I am always fascinated to see London in 1960, the year I was born. Very little traffic, men in hat’s, smoking nearly everywhere...
 

TamH70

MIA
The League of Gentlemen.
Seen it several times, but happy to watch it again. Apart from the Army stuff it is a good yarn, and I am always fascinated to see London in 1960, the year I was born. Very little traffic, men in hat’s, smoking nearly everywhere...
And a really unfit ending foisted on the film because of the moral code of the time that said that bad guys couldn't win.
 

TamH70

MIA
Well yes there is that of course.
To be fair it is a brilliant film, one of Jack Hawkins' best - even though it was made when Hawkins already had had major problems with his throat, a precursor to the cancer that took his larynx.
 
Downing Street Siege on Netflix. Jesus wept!! What a load of bollox from the start, when "Major" Lowe walks into the boardroom with corporal's stripes on his sleeves and throws up a gauche US-style salute. With his cap under his arm. And unshaven. Later there is a "lootenant" colonel with a majors crown on each shoulder.

And it goes downhill from there. I've a sneaking suspicion I've seen it before a few years ago, along with the preceding "installment" referenced in the preamble.

That was shite, too.
So that's a no then?
 
Feck me I've only just seen the Official Trailer for the new James Bond Film, 'No Time To Die' featuring 18 year old Billy Eilish singing the theme song.

That scene where Bond leaps off the viaduct holding a length of rope with one hand FFS. I am looking forward to seeing this.

Before Daniel Craig took on the role of Mr Bond I had never watched a Bond Film, but I've seen all the films where he has played Bond. He is one cool handsome bastrad.

Ahem...cough..I'm not, but if I had to take one for the team...
 

skid2

LE
Book Reviewer
The Commuter.
In a very long list of Neeson failures ,this is in the top three (at the moment) More holes than a truck load of Gryuere.
Very disappointing.
i wish I read this before I bothered watching the movie. I think I stuck with it because I expected it to waken up/ do something?

Sadly it didn't happen. His movie with the plane crash and the snow. I caught myself as it went on, thinking ‘Great jumper’ as in item of clothing.
 

spoolerdog

Clanker
12 Strong, good cast plenty of action with those never need reloading guns. It's a 20th century combination of Charge of the Light Brigade, Custers Last Stand etc etc, based on a true series of events in modern day Afghanistan of how a small force of american special forces on horseback gave the Taliban and bin ladens mob a bloody nose. While not a masterepiece it's worth a watch.

Watched this a while back and thought it was very good. Then I read the book and the film only covers about 1/3 of what actually went on. Book superb and lots of detail of the mission in Afghanistan - well worth a read (12 Strong by Doug Stanton)
 
Jungle, stars Daniel Radcliffe who play Yossi Ghinsberg an Isreali who gets lost in the amazon rain forest for a couple of weeks. Based on a true story it brings to the front what can quickly go wrong and what it takes(with a lot of luck)to get yourself out of the ensuing mess.
 
Deadtectives



A team of hapless reality TV ghost hunters experiences true paranormal activity for the first time while filming a make-or-break episode in the most haunted mansion in Mexico.

No spoilers from me but worth a watch if you like a good story - scary enough to make you jump, but with some extremely laugh out loud funny bits. My Doris even enjoyed it and she's not a fan of horror films.

Even better - it's on youtube for free...


Enjoy... :)
 

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