What film have you just watched?

Right now on Drama channel, Gregory's Girl for the umpteenth time. Still funny, and i think Clare Grogan might be in it.
Interesting timing. Saw this just an hour ago.

BBC News - Clare Grogan: 'I'm still waiting for the bubble to burst'
 

BigT

LE
I saw Train to Busan again on Film 4 on Saturday, as zombie films go it's possibly the best.

We watched Jo Jo Rabbit earlier, it was both odd, amusing, sad and enjoyable, the scene where Jo Jo chases the butterfly was so unexpected, I totally choked up even the evil twin got emotional. Sam Rockwell as Cpt Klenzendorf was particularly good and his last scene was just below the butterfly scene for an "it's a bit dusty in here" moment.
 
Just watched Glory At Sea, a.k.a. The Gift Horse made in 1952. It's posted on You Tube on line and is of acceptable quality. It is the story of the St Nazaire Raid or Operation Chariot, which was a British amphibious attack on the heavily defended Normandie dry dock at St Nazaire in German-occupied France during the Second World War.

The original title of "Gift Horse" refers to the fact that the vessel used for this assault was one of 50 World War I destroyers that were transferred to the Royal Navy from the US Navy in 1940.

Quite a few famous faces appear in this movie. Trevor Howard is the captain, James Donald, his No. 1, and a young Dickie Attenbourough shows up as an AB who starts out being a sea lawyer but is whipped into shape by the guiding hands of his division chief. Even William Russell has a small role as a crewman in this movie, going by the name Russell Enoch, but his fame would come later in the 1960s when he played the companion Ian Chesterton during the first Doctor Who, William Hartnell, time in the Tardis.
 
Interesting timing. Saw this just an hour ago.

BBC News - Clare Grogan: 'I'm still waiting for the bubble to burst'
As much as I like Clare Grogan, and I really do, 40 years in the limelight? I can't recall seeing much of her since Red Dwarf.
 
Just watched Glory At Sea, a.k.a. The Gift Horse made in 1952. It's posted on You Tube on line and is of acceptable quality. It is the story of the St Nazaire Raid or Operation Chariot, which was a British amphibious attack on the heavily defended Normandie dry dock at St Nazaire in German-occupied France during the Second World War.

The original title of "Gift Horse" refers to the fact that the vessel used for this assault was one of 50 World War I destroyers that were transferred to the Royal Navy from the US Navy in 1940.

Quite a few famous faces appear in this movie. Trevor Howard is the captain, James Donald, his No. 1, and a young Dickie Attenbourough shows up as an AB who starts out being a sea lawyer but is whipped into shape by the guiding hands of his division chief. Even William Russell has a small role as a crewman in this movie, going by the name Russell Enoch, but his fame would come later in the 1960s when he played the companion Ian Chesterton during the first Doctor Who, William Hartnell, time in the Tardis.
I believe the film was released with alternative titles for the UK and American audiences .

Odd … I too watched “ The Gift Horse “ last week . Enjoyable with some touching camera work including when Lt Cdr Fraser (Trevor Howard ) reads his son has been lost in action .

Well spotted … the Dr Who actor connection … also included are a young Bond “M” ( Bernard Lee ) appearance as a Stripey ... and Sid James as the Public House owner .
 
I saw Train to Busan again on Film 4 on Saturday, as zombie films go it's possibly the best.
Not an afficionado for Zombie films, but thought Train to Busan was really good entertainment. Quirky, touching, humorous as well as the scary zombie element.
 

NSP

LE
Not an afficionado for Zombie films, but thought Train to Busan was really good entertainment. Quirky, touching, humorous as well as the scary zombie element.
And they still kept the train running on time.

Imagine that happening here - even without the Z-pocalypse!
 
Just before going on holiday last week, saw parts of Old Bill and Son on the Picturehouse channel before the other half groaned about me watching old war films again.


Never seen it before. The link tells more about it but filmed in '41 and set during the phoney war phase in France.

It is very much of its time and was only mildly entertaining so wasn't too worried about not seeing the whole of it. What struck me though the almost formal parade before going off on patrol in one of the scenes. Would that have happened?

The other one was seeing the uniforms and equipment being worn as they would have been, rather than current day representations. (And who thought tying up a gas cape on the top of the back with a bit of string was a good idea?)
 

NSP

LE
I watched Ride With The Devil on Netflix last night, essentially about the futility of "The War On Drugs" and the paranoia and suspicion inherent in the supply chain.

Despite having Nicholas Cage in it it was really rather good.
 
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Arte_et_Marte

ADC
Moderator
Just watched Glory At Sea, a.k.a. The Gift Horse made in 1952. It's posted on You Tube on line and is of acceptable quality. It is the story of the St Nazaire Raid or Operation Chariot, which was a British amphibious attack on the heavily defended Normandie dry dock at St Nazaire in German-occupied France during the Second World War.

The original title of "Gift Horse" refers to the fact that the vessel used for this assault was one of 50 World War I destroyers that were transferred to the Royal Navy from the US Navy in 1940.

Quite a few famous faces appear in this movie. Trevor Howard is the captain, James Donald, his No. 1, and a young Dickie Attenbourough shows up as an AB who starts out being a sea lawyer but is whipped into shape by the guiding hands of his division chief. Even William Russell has a small role as a crewman in this movie, going by the name Russell Enoch, but his fame would come later in the 1960s when he played the companion Ian Chesterton during the first Doctor Who, William Hartnell, time in the Tardis.
Indeed, and I have just noticed that 'Triggers' dad plays a member of the Board of Inquiry. Charles Lloyd-Pack.
 
In a crappy hotel last night with only what's on my laptop and gash drive to choose from. Watched Three Colours: Blue from the Three Colours Trilogy.

Set in 1990s' Paris a woman loses both her famous composer husband and her only child in a car accident from which she is the only survivor. Consumed by grief she sets about selling the considerable chateau and all the possessions they have, keeping only a blue crystal chandelier from her daughters bedroom. She also destroys all her husband's compositions, including a 1/2 finished symphony commissioned to celebrate the 'Unification of Europe' (this was set just after Mastrict.)

She then attempts to create a new simple life in Paris, shunning her past and refusing to embrace human relationships. Her past however catches up with her and after finding out that her previous lover, a friend of her late husband, is attempting to complete the symphony, she's forced to reevaluate the consequences of her actions on those around her.

Not a usual choice for a Monday night but any opportunity to gaze at the most gorgeous Juliette Binoche for 90 mins and the fact that the cinematography is stunning made it actually quite worthwhile.

Warning: It is actually in French with sub-titles
 

TamH70

MIA
Lifeforce, the 1985 box office disaster that helped kill Goran and Globus' Cannon Films studio -along with Tobe Hooper's career as a high-end director, starring Mathilda May as a disguised alien space bat vampire (literally), who gets her kit off with great effect for most of her on-screen time as she's heading up a rampage around that London like. Also with Steve Railsback as the commander of the joint US/UK space mission that kicks off the ensuing mess (and coincidentally later on in the movie gives Sir Patrick Stewart his first on-screen kiss - yeah, Picard's in the film and snogs a guy (ish) - though it has to be said that that is a huge step-up from appearing as the Poop emoji) and Peter Firth as a Colonel in the SAS who is one of a team tasked to deal with her - but has no organic back-up from the Regiment to cover his ass, for some odd reason.


It's quite entertaining, the '80's style special effects are streets ahead of anything Doctor Who was doing at the time, and the levels of carnage throughout the film are quite impressive, but as stated at the time in contemporary gossip, the two greatest points in the film are both on Der Fraulein Mathilda.

It seems the making of the film was a process that was almost as chaotic as the on-screen action, if not more so:


Highly recommended, but extremely weird.
 
In a crappy hotel last night with only what's on my laptop and gash drive to choose from. Watched Three Colours: Blue from the Three Colours Trilogy.

Set in 1990s' Paris a woman loses both her famous composer husband and her only child in a car accident from which she is the only survivor. Consumed by grief she sets about selling the considerable chateau and all the possessions they have, keeping only a blue crystal chandelier from her daughters bedroom. She also destroys all her husband's compositions, including a 1/2 finished symphony commissioned to celebrate the 'Unification of Europe' (this was set just after Mastrict.)

She then attempts to create a new simple life in Paris, shunning her past and refusing to embrace human relationships. Her past however catches up with her and after finding out that her previous lover, a friend of her late husband, is attempting to complete the symphony, she's forced to reevaluate the consequences of her actions on those around her.

Not a usual choice for a Monday night but any opportunity to gaze at the most gorgeous Juliette Binoche for 90 mins and the fact that the cinematography is stunning made it actually quite worthwhile.

Warning: It is actually in French with sub-titles
I'd seen all 3 of the trilogy when they first came out. Really impressed with them at the time.


 
Once again I have sat through a Netflix series called "FAUDA" actually very good'
basically the story revolves around the Israeli and hamas shennanigans,
worth a watch imho.
 
I would highly recommend Oranges & Sunshine

Oranges and Sunshine (2010) - IMDb

Which tells the story of Margaret Humphreys a social worker in Nottingham who uncovered the forced emigration of children from Britain, to Australia and other countries, right up until 1970.

I don't know how this story or the film passed me by, but somehow it did.

Absolutely shocking, a true story, 130,000 children!

Buy tissues, watch it.

 
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NSP

LE
The Coldest Game on Netflix. Purports to be about how Penkovsky got his int to the west and averted the CMC. Revolves around a chess champion who has a bigger drink problem than I (allegedly) have and there may be a brief moment where a courier for Penkovsky slips him the int and gets it to the west - but that doesn't seem to really play to how the internet says it happened.

A bit shit, really. Bill Pullman should retire.
 
Rewatched the first ten minutes of Sly Stallone's Cobra last night, what was I thinking. More to the point, what the original audiences thinking paying to watch this drivel at the cinema.
Wasn't that just a excuse to get his bimbo de Jure Brigitte Nielsen into a film?
 
Wasn't that just a excuse to get his bimbo de Jure Brigitte Nielsen into a film?
That would only work for me as an incentive to watch if she was fit as fcuk and got her kit off regularly..
 
I bought a Bluray copy of the movie “The First Man”, which was purportedly the story of the first moon landing told from Neil Armstrong’s perspective. I was rather disappointed in it however, as it depicts Neil Armstrong as rather a dull dog not prone to showing much emotion at all. You would think that a guy who had had the opportunity to travel to the moon (something that had never been done before) and come back alive at the end, would have had more to say about the experience. Apparently not if you believe the story line as put forward in this movie.

It was shot from the inside of the cabin too, in whatever vehicle that Neil Armstrong was riding in, be it the cockpit of the X-15 rocket plane, Gemini 8, the Flying Bedstead trainer, or Apollo 11. Not much of a view of outside surroundings and a darkly lit interior jumble of control panels and flashing lights. It wasn’t impressive as the Tom Hanks miniseries, “From The Earth to the Moon” (1998_) was, and didn’t show much of early space hardware that NASA spent so much money on developing (and that Tom Hanks showcased in the miniseries).

The movie starts with a flight that Neil Armstrong had made in the X-15 rocket plane in the late 1950s or very early 1960s. He had apparently driven the X-15 to such a height that he was above the atmosphere, or most of it, and there was a very real risk of him being unable to return to the Earth as he would bounce off the atmosphere if he attempted a re-entry. He figured a way out of his dilemma however by using jets of gas vented to the outside that forced his plane into a steep dive to a lower altitude where his flying controls would work again. When he got back down on the ground again, the most he could muster to say about his near-death experience was “I’m alright.” Test pilots are supposed to have nerves of steel and quick to plan ways to get out of difficult situations, but it beggars belief that they wouldn’t manage at least one wipe of a sweaty brow and managing to exhale a loud “Whew!” after a particularly harrowing experience.

I don't know. Maybe Neil Armstrong was dull as ditchwater and not demonstrative in real life; I never met the man, but it beggers belief that he could have been so cold and stone-like as exhibited in this movie.
 

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