What film have you just watched?

He became addicted to morphine (administered due to wounds) and went cold turkey for a couple of weeks locked alone in an hotel room. A different kind of courage.
Murphy also was one of the first to publicly talk about PTSD and returning Korean and Vietnam vets and the need for support for them
 
Wasn’t that also the case with Audie Murphy’s film To Hell and Back? Some of his actual exploits had to be toned down for believabilty.
On his first day of combat he killed 2 Italian Officers on horseback from 400 yds with 2 shots
 

old_fat_and_hairy

LE
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Indeed it does! As a film script, this would be thought ludicrous but it was true. The word 'hero' doesn't seem enough.
I remember reading an account of a guy who performed some heroics during a later war and the highest praise it was felt he'd achieved was some Aussie comrades saying he'd "Been there for his mates when they needed him".

I wonder sometimes if, when Hero seems not quite enough, that things like the above praise speaks greater volumes. Nowadays we seem to live in an age where everyone seems to be a hero these days.
 
On his first day of combat he killed 2 Italian Officers on horseback from 400 yds with 2 shots
Lifted from his biography:
Born in Kingston, Hunt County, Texas, on June 20, 1925, Audie Murphy was raised in a sharecropper's dilapidated house.
Before I moved to the other side of Dallas I used to go out to the area he was born a few times a week to the range. When they say he was born in a dilapidated house, then it must have been bad becasue some of the places people live in out there look like nailed together MFO boxes with a wriggly tin roof, dire poverty.

They have a cotton museum out there which is named after him and he is still regarded as a local hero.


And, if any of you get the urge, reading his autobiography is worth it too.
 
The Vanishing on Sky, with Peter Mullan And Gerald Butler, two excellent actors who don't usually seem to show up in a duff film. This one's excellent; well recommended.
 
Yesterday quite enjoyed it tbh.
 
The Vanishing on Sky, with Peter Mullan And Gerald Butler, two excellent actors who don't usually seem to show up in a duff film. This one's excellent; well recommended.

With the exception of Butler appearing in the "_____ Has Fallen" franchise you mean? :p
 
With the exception of Butler appearing in the "_____ Has Fallen" franchise you mean? :p
Not seen. You have to pay three whiskies' worth of dosh to sit in a cinema for that. I invariable fall asleep after half an hour in a cinema, at which point people unkindly criticise me for snoring.
 
Amazing Grace

A documentary of Aretha Franklin recording her live Gospel album of the same name, in 1972.

This film made in 1972 was only put on general release in May this year. The story of how it took so long to be released could be made into a film all of its own.

One of the problems was that the director, Sydney Pollock (yes, that Sydney Pollock!) did not use any form of clapper board during the shoot, consequently it was impossible to synch the sound to the film until about 2010.

it was recorded over two nights and the film is split into Night One and Night Two. Pollock himself is seen during the filming of Night One with a camera filming from the front row -- he couldn't focus for sh1t!. The quality of the filming and lighting is fceking dire, especially during Night One.

But enough of the negatives, the sound engineers were on the ball though! Brilliantly so, most definitely: these go up to eleven.

Watch out for Mick Jagger slipping into the back row and grooving.

If you're a fan of soul or R&B then this is a must.

11 all the way, baby, stone cold 11!
 
Lifted from his biography:

Before I moved to the other side of Dallas I used to go out to the area he was born a few times a week to the range. When they say he was born in a dilapidated house, then it must have been bad becasue some of the places people live in out there look like nailed together MFO boxes with a wriggly tin roof, dire poverty.

They have a cotton museum out there which is named after him and he is still regarded as a local hero.


And, if any of you get the urge, reading his autobiography is worth it too.
I believe it has been suggested that his marksmanship was founded on the fact that as a youth if he missed a shot at something the family went hungry.
 
Another Blast from the Past

Caddyshack.


Its quite tame compared to the more recent Gross Out comedies but apparently pushed the boundaries at the time.

One detail that I noted is that it seems to predate lycra in underwear.
Caddyshack is a favourite of mine, along with the National Lampoon films.
 

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