What film have you just watched?

(Mostly) an urban myth: as the cat sits by the door, before going out, it licks the butter off it's paws thus diluting the scent of it's old home.

Which is arrse, as the scent is all over it's body and fur: still, others say that it is a simple calming measure to reduce stress and many people says that it works.
Not sure of the mechanism but Grandma CLC advised that when we rehomed a cat.
 
Watched Smokey and the Bandit, for the umpteenth time. Refreshingly uncensored and still rather funny after all these years. I must be odd though - I never wanted the Bandit's Trans Am when I was a lad. It was always that big huge Kenworth semi-truck.

Though when I got a bit older I wouldn't have minded getting Sally Field instead.
 
Watched Smokey and the Bandit, for the umpteenth time. Refreshingly uncensored and still rather funny after all these years. I must be odd though - I never wanted the Bandit's Trans Am when I was a lad. It was always that big huge Kenworth semi-truck.

Though when I got a bit older I wouldn't have minded getting Sally Field instead.
Jackie Gleason as the sheriff stole the movie for me. ‘No way did you spring from my loins. When we get home I’m gonna punch yo mama in the mouth’
The sequels were crap though.
 
Not cats and butter, but many years ago I used to keep guinea pigs. When introducing a new guinea pig I used to smear Vicks Vapour Rub on their noses. The Vicks used to overpower any natural smells and make it easier to integrate the new guinea pig. Perhaps there is something similar with cats? @BossHogg Is an expert on both. He might be able to clarify.
Our cat adopted us, whenever I bond guinea pigs, I bathe them all with the same medicated shampoo, I then put them in a cleaned "bonding" cage. The same smell on all of them plus neutral introduction space, tends to do the trick. I've never had a failed bonding. ;)
 
My Mum would butter a cats paws when moving.
She said that the cat would like the butter off and decide that it liked it in the new home and stay.
Always seemed a bit oldy worldy to me and a tad mad but hey ho. The cats always stayed put.
 
"Fate is the Hunter" (1964)



Let me start by stating that I read the book, by Ernest K. Gann, a man who learned to fly in barnstormers before getting a job delivering the US Mail in open cockpit biplanes, leftovers from WW1.
THE BOOK follows his career, flying for one of the first airlines, at a time when businessmen were forbidden by their insurers from using air transport, to post WW2 and a failed attempt at launching a viable challenger to Pan Am, and TWA.
Pilots will particularly appreciate the anecdotes, pre-GPS navigation, pre-ILS and navigation beacons, plus a pilot with a fake licence who the author eventually outed, only to have man join a different airline, with a different identity, and cause a fatal crash from which only he walked away. Practically identical circumstances to the crash that killed actress/singer Aaliyah and her band seventy years later.

However, the movie , with its star cast of Glenn Ford and Rod Taylor, and Suzanne Pleshette, whom I had a crush on since I was ten, bears zero relationship to the book, other than the title, which was all that 20th Century Fox wanted when they bought the film rights.
This film concerns an ill fated flight that sees a bird strike take out one of its two engines. The radios go out next, quickly followed by a fire light on the remaining engine. The engine is shut down at Jack Savages order.
Veteran pilot, Captain Jack Savage (Rod Taylor), manages to glide down to a beach for a wheels up landing, which would have been perfect but for a pier that was in the way.
Chief Stewardess, Martha Webster, (the lovely Ms Pleshette) is the only survivor, and the onboard flight recorder has been destroyed.

At an early stage of the investigation by the FAA, the second engine is recovered, in pristine condition, completely undamaged.
The airline, and insurers, order airline executive and former pilot, Sam McBane (Glenn Ford) to declare pilot error, as this is preferable to the law suits which will follow a claim by an ambulance chasing reporter that Captain Savage had been seen in two bars, earlier in the evening.
McBane had flown as second officer with Savage for years and knew him to be a professional, so he runs his own crash investigation on behalf of the airline, as you do.

Lots of back-story about flying over The Hump during WW2 and the women in Captain Jack Savages life, Nancy Kwan, and Jane Russell in the decades long train of events that is meant to seal his fate.

It is a bit dated, but the acting is good even if the story is overly dramatic. If you have read the book it will be disappointing, though.

.
 
'The Court Martial of Billy Mitchell' (1955)



In 1921, WW1 flying hero, Gen. Billy Mitchell (Gary Cooper), commands an Army Air Corps of 150 WW1 vintage aircraft, of which only nine are combat ready. In the USA, civilian aircraft development is slowly progressing whereas military aircraft development in non-existent. The post-war budgets have seen a dozen battleships sent to the breakers yard, regiments disbanded, and armaments development stagnate. Mitchell's superior, Maj Gen. James Guthrie (Charles Bickford) does not share Mitchell's enthusiasm or foresight. Mitchell predicted the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbour twenty five years before it happened, stating that it would be early morning and their carriers would be 150 miles away. Guthrie states that he has gone into two wars with unprepared, under trained and ill equipped troops, the country needed an army before it needed and air corps.

Guthrie is painted as the bad guy, a dinosaur, but the real Guthrie was a hell of a soldier. He had failed the West Point entrance exam, joined as a rifleman, risen to Lt in the Spanish-American War, raised and trained the Philippine Scouts, and reached the rank of major before WW1 broke out. As an official observer, he had witnessed the genocide of the Armenian Christians by the Muslim Turks, who employed Slavic mercenaries to do the dirty work while keeping their hands clean. "There can be no peace in this region due to the urge for revenge." He had a photographic memory and extraordinary organisational skills, recognised by Pershing who attached him to his staff of the US Expeditionary Force, saying of him "If there is a problem Jimmy Guthrie cannot solve then it is beyond mortal man.
Raised to Brigadier, Guthrie was given the task of relieving the commander of the US logistics effort as it was in a mess. He sorted it out in record time. Brigadier Doyen USMC contracted the flu, which soon proved fatal, and Pershing gave Guthrie command of the USMC Brigade, leading it during their famous, and costly, battles in France.
He was a realist, not a dinosaur.


Guthrie orders Mitchell attack a target ship, a captured German battleship, as part of a demonstration designed to prove that air power was ineffective. Mitchell is ordered to attack at 5000ft, above effective AA range, using standard 500lb bombs. Mitchell starts his attack at 5000ft but dives to 1000ft and releases 2000lb bombs which sink the target.
For disobedience to orders, Mitchell is reduced to Colonel and posted to a desk in Texas.
The wreck of the Shenandoah, a navy airship, that broke up in a storm , and the loss of four aircraft on a cross country flight, have Mitchell call a press conference whereupon he calls the general staffs of the army and navy criminally negligent and responsible for the deaths.
The film shows a courtroom presided over by Guthrie and a host of senior officers, including MacArthur, denying Mitchell his day in court and using legal slight of hand, which culminates in Mitchell's finding of guilt on all charges, with the rather light punishment of suspension of pay and allowances for five years.
He resigns and walks off down the street.
Cutaway to Super Sabres flying as he is the acclaimed Father of the USAF.

I like 'The Coop', despite his rather stilted acting skills, he can deliver a line and looks the part.

Good retro TV of the Sunday Matinee era of black and white telly.
 
'The Court Martial of Billy Mitchell' (1955)



In 1921, WW1 flying hero, Gen. Billy Mitchell (Gary Cooper), commands an Army Air Corps of 150 WW1 vintage aircraft, of which only nine are combat ready. In the USA, civilian aircraft development is slowly progressing whereas military aircraft development in non-existent. The post-war budgets have seen a dozen battleships sent to the breakers yard, regiments disbanded, and armaments development stagnate. Mitchell's superior, Maj Gen. James Guthrie (Charles Bickford) does not share Mitchell's enthusiasm or foresight. Mitchell predicted the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbour twenty five years before it happened, stating that it would be early morning and their carriers would be 150 miles away. Guthrie states that he has gone into two wars with unprepared, under trained and ill equipped troops, the country needed an army before it needed and air corps.

Guthrie is painted as the bad guy, a dinosaur, but the real Guthrie was a hell of a soldier. He had failed the West Point entrance exam, joined as a rifleman, risen to Lt in the Spanish-American War, raised and trained the Philippine Scouts, and reached the rank of major before WW1 broke out. As an official observer, he had witnessed the genocide of the Armenian Christians by the Muslim Turks, who employed Slavic mercenaries to do the dirty work while keeping their hands clean. "There can be no peace in this region due to the urge for revenge." He had a photographic memory and extraordinary organisational skills, recognised by Pershing who attached him to his staff of the US Expeditionary Force, saying of him "If there is a problem Jimmy Guthrie cannot solve then it is beyond mortal man.
Raised to Brigadier, Guthrie was given the task of relieving the commander of the US logistics effort as it was in a mess. He sorted it out in record time. Brigadier Doyen USMC contracted the flu, which soon proved fatal, and Pershing gave Guthrie command of the USMC Brigade, leading it during their famous, and costly, battles in France.
He was a realist, not a dinosaur.


Guthrie orders Mitchell attack a target ship, a captured German battleship, as part of a demonstration designed to prove that air power was ineffective. Mitchell is ordered to attack at 5000ft, above effective AA range, using standard 500lb bombs. Mitchell starts his attack at 5000ft but dives to 1000ft and releases 2000lb bombs which sink the target.
For disobedience to orders, Mitchell is reduced to Colonel and posted to a desk in Texas.
The wreck of the Shenandoah, a navy airship, that broke up in a storm , and the loss of four aircraft on a cross country flight, have Mitchell call a press conference whereupon he calls the general staffs of the army and navy criminally negligent and responsible for the deaths.
The film shows a courtroom presided over by Guthrie and a host of senior officers, including MacArthur, denying Mitchell his day in court and using legal slight of hand, which culminates in Mitchell's finding of guilt on all charges, with the rather light punishment of suspension of pay and allowances for five years.
He resigns and walks off down the street.
Cutaway to Super Sabres flying as he is the acclaimed Father of the USAF.

I like 'The Coop', despite his rather stilted acting skills, he can deliver a line and looks the part.

Good retro TV of the Sunday Matinee era of black and white telly.
Mitchell was a very early enthusiast for Airborne ops.He devised a plan during WW1 to (involuntary) train the first infantry division as paratroops,and drop them behind enemy lines.
Quite a forward thinker.
Back to the thread.
 
Mitchell was a very early enthusiast for Airborne ops.He devised a plan during WW1 to (involuntary) train the first infantry division as paratroops,and drop them behind enemy lines.
Quite a forward thinker.
Back to the thread.
He was better in Eastenders.
 
Mitchell was a very early enthusiast for Airborne ops.He devised a plan during WW1 to (involuntary) train the first infantry division as paratroops,and drop them behind enemy lines.
Quite a forward thinker.
Back to the thread.
Shame he wasn’t forward thinking enough to realise what would happen if he disobeyed orders.
 
"Fate is the Hunter" (1964)



Let me start by stating that I read the book, by Ernest K. Gann, a man who learned to fly in barnstormers before getting a job delivering the US Mail in open cockpit biplanes, leftovers from WW1.
THE BOOK follows his career, flying for one of the first airlines, at a time when businessmen were forbidden by their insurers from using air transport, to post WW2 and a failed attempt at launching a viable challenger to Pan Am, and TWA.
Pilots will particularly appreciate the anecdotes, pre-GPS navigation, pre-ILS and navigation beacons, plus a pilot with a fake licence who the author eventually outed, only to have man join a different airline, with a different identity, and cause a fatal crash from which only he walked away. Practically identical circumstances to the crash that killed actress/singer Aaliyah and her band seventy years later.

However, the movie , with its star cast of Glenn Ford and Rod Taylor, and Suzanne Pleshette, whom I had a crush on since I was ten, bears zero relationship to the book, other than the title, which was all that 20th Century Fox wanted when they bought the film rights.
This film concerns an ill fated flight that sees a bird strike take out one of its two engines. The radios go out next, quickly followed by a fire light on the remaining engine. The engine is shut down at Jack Savages order.
Veteran pilot, Captain Jack Savage (Rod Taylor), manages to glide down to a beach for a wheels up landing, which would have been perfect but for a pier that was in the way.
Chief Stewardess, Martha Webster, (the lovely Ms Pleshette) is the only survivor, and the onboard flight recorder has been destroyed.

At an early stage of the investigation by the FAA, the second engine is recovered, in pristine condition, completely undamaged.
The airline, and insurers, order airline executive and former pilot, Sam McBane (Glenn Ford) to declare pilot error, as this is preferable to the law suits which will follow a claim by an ambulance chasing reporter that Captain Savage had been seen in two bars, earlier in the evening.
McBane had flown as second officer with Savage for years and knew him to be a professional, so he runs his own crash investigation on behalf of the airline, as you do.

Lots of back-story about flying over The Hump during WW2 and the women in Captain Jack Savages life, Nancy Kwan, and Jane Russell in the decades long train of events that is meant to seal his fate.

It is a bit dated, but the acting is good even if the story is overly dramatic. If you have read the book it will be disappointing, though.

.
Gann was so appalled at the film that he wanted his name removed from the credits. Hollywood had a history of massacring his books as they also made a film out of "The High and the Mighty" that was so bad that I used to use a clip from it in my safety management systems lecture to demonstrate the lack of crew resource management. It starred John Wayne and Robert Stack.
 
@Andy Farman. Watched the full film about Gen. Mitchell on YT on your recommendation, it's a good story. Reading Mitchell's bio today, he was more James Cagney than Gary Cooper. It's just a film by Otto Preminger though the real Gen. William "Billy" Mitchell was much more savvy with the press and public opinion in his air power case. Could just be me but Coop played his usual naive, noble neophyte.

William 'Billy' Mitchell -- 'The father of the United States Air Force'

Saw Glass this weekend , another Shyamalan comic book film that's not as bad as some critics are painting it. James McAvoy plays a blinder with two dozen characters/aliases - there were more aliases dropped from the final cut - and if you liked Unbreakable with Bruce Willis and Sam Jackson you might like this.

M. Night Shyamalan has raided his previous productions and not a few comic books for this trilogy release.
 
Finally got around to watching Bohemian Rhapsody. Don't know how much was truth and how much was artistic licence but I thought it was absolutely awesome. Rami Malik was just brilliant, as were the rest of the guys who played the band. I hope they get well deserved awards at the Oscars for it.
The finale at Live Aid was amazing to watch. Gave me a itching to listen to Queens music again.
 
'Close', a Netflix offering featuring the delightful Noomi Rapace and an even more delighful to look at ward (Sophie Nelisse) in what is a different take on an action flick. It's intelligent and suitably gritty, though sometimes the plot is a bit hard to follow. Worth a look though as it's far from a typical bullets flying offering.

The soundtrack is decent too.
 
'Close', a Netflix offering featuring the delightful Noomi Rapace and an even more delighful to look at ward (Sophie Nelisse) in what is a different take on an action flick. It's intelligent and suitably gritty, though sometimes the plot is a bit hard to follow. Worth a look though as it's far from a typical bullets flying offering.

The soundtrack is decent too.
Yeah, I'd support that: Woman and I watched it last night-not bad for a low budget buddy movie.
 
"The High and the Mighty" that was so bad that I used to use a clip from it in my safety management systems lecture to demonstrate the lack of crew resource management. It starred John Wayne and Robert Stack.
Ouch!
 

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