What film have you just watched?

I seem to recall that one of the senior NCO's involved in the "Blackhawk Down" rescue was also later sentenced to Leavenworth for having sex with a minor.

I wonder if there's something in the water?

Cheers,
Dan.
SPC John Stebbins (NATO OR-4), was convicted in 1999 of sexually molesting his daughter. Ewan McGregor portrayed him
 
It was Tom Courtenay (the troubled young man) night on TCM, and I'm currently watching Private Potter (1962). It's about a soldier in Cyprus who foils his comrades raid to capture a high-ranking EOKA member, by screaming out loud just before the raid starts. One soldier is killed, and the EOKA member escapes. Potter claims that he saw God, which made him yell. The film is about the debate among the officers on what to do with him. Is he a coward, a visionary or mad? Not too bad of a film, so far.

By the way, Potter's regiment is the 1st Rutland Yeomanry.

It got me recalling that Courtenay, as a soldier named Private Hamp, also saw God (or maybe it was Christ) in King and Country (1964) which featured Dirk Bogarde. I don't yet know how Private Potter ends, but in King and Country, Private Hamp is shot for desertion.

Oh, wait, Private Potter has just escaped custody and taken off for the mountains. Gotta go.

Cheers,
Dan.
Missed it, saw him in King and Country with Dirk Bogarde and Night of the Generals with Omar Sharif and Peter O'Toole last night
 
Missed it, saw him in King and Country with Dirk Bogarde and Night of the Generals with Omar Sharif and Peter O'Toole last night
Looks like someone else has access to TCM. It was Tom Courtenay Day at TCM. In "King and Country" he played the hapless British private shot in the trenches after court-martial; in "Night of the Generals" he played the hapless driver for the psychotic General Tanz (Peter O'Toole) who framed him for the murder of a French prostitute. Good stuff actually; I have recorded both films in the past for later reviewing.
 
Hereditary

Horror film debut from writer and director Ari Aster

One of the most unsettling horror films I've seen in years.

The only thing I can compare it to is The Witch featuring Ralph Inneson from a couple of years back.

It's almost Kubrick like in its precision.

Featured one of the best horror scores I've heard in some time
 
'Generation Kill' was an interesting view. I kept swinging from the feeling that it was equine excreta to a hideous thought that if it was an accurate portrayal of the USMC then gawd help us all. However, the final 5 minutes or so when the reporter is saying farewell to Lt. Col. Ferrando did put a lot of things into context. Its worth viewing but as an historical portrayal, who knows?
Watched it a couple of times when it was released. Found it thought provoking on a lot of levels (i've also got the book but since ditched the box set) so did some net digging & its seems as though it is pretty bang on to what went on. Part of our reporter's incredulity at what he saw pushed him to write the book, although that doesn't come across as much as it does in the book. I haven't seen the original magazine articles he filed bit i seem to recall they weren't as critical as his book was. Editorial decisions back at head office perchance?
 
Iron Sky, Sci-Fi comedy about the Nazis fleeing to the moon at the end of war and living there ever since in secret and preparing to conquer the earth. Entertaining enough if you're bored but its more weird than funny.
 
Iron Sky, Sci-Fi comedy about the Nazis fleeing to the moon at the end of war and living there ever since in secret and preparing to conquer the earth. Entertaining enough if you're bored but its more weird than funny.
Oh, I don't know. The campaign manager losing her rag during the space battle before nuking everything was quite titter-raising. And the smackdown at the UN.

Heil Kortzfleisch!
 
Oh, I don't know. The campaign manager losing her rag during the space battle before nuking everything was quite titter-raising. And the smackdown at the UN.

Heil Kortsfleish!

Dont get me wrong it had a few funny moments but could have been better, will have to see what the sequel is like when it comes out later this year

 
Last edited:
Dont get me wrong it had a few funny moments but could have been better, will have to see what the sequel is like when it comes out later this year

The same bunch of Fins made the "comedy" spoof Star Wreck. It clearly lost something in the translation for the subtitles as it is about as funny as syphilis. Apart from the couple of seconds when the captain slips on the soap in his shower.
 
Andersonville, a Ted Turner job, directed by John Frankenheimer, French Connection II (1975), and Ronin (1998 ). Having read about the Confederates' Camp Sumter prison, with some interest in the ACW , the costumes are decent and the film tries to tell the history - thousands of starving Union prisoners in a 12-acre enclosure. The replicated prison camp and the conditions are done well; the acting is great, in parts.
I liked the overdue revenge exacted on the villain 'raiders' element, and the trial

Watched it in the early hours, all the way through 2hrs 47mins, and it passed the time as decent treatment of a depressing subject with scurvy, deprivation and murder. For those interested, I found history books and a novel about Camp Sumter, and at least one prisoner's diary: Full text of "Andersonville diary; escape, and list of dead, with name, company, regiment, date of death and number of grave in cemetery" .

The real Camp Sumter / Andersonville Prison.
 
"Abba In Concert", the film of their 1979 gig in London. Great songs, great singers.
 
13 Hours The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi. Based on a true story about US security staff's defence of the US embassy in Libya in 2012.

Never read the book only seen the film, but if only half of the film is true then balls of steel is my opinion.

The film is not full of the usual American gung ho BS, there's a few bits but the action scenes make up for it.
 
Seen the new Bladerunner pop up on my Now TV box

Is the Blade Runner sequel worth a watch, or am I going to ruin the enjoyment of the original by watching it ?
I thought Bladerunner 2049 was excellent.
 
Andersonville, a Ted Turner job, directed by John Frankenheimer, French Connection II (1975), and Ronin (1998 ). Having read about the Confederates' Camp Sumter prison, with some interest in the ACW , the costumes are decent and the film tries to tell the history - thousands of starving Union prisoners in a 12-acre enclosure. The replicated prison camp and the conditions are done well; the acting is great, in parts.
I liked the overdue revenge exacted on the villain 'raiders' element, and the trial

Watched it in the early hours, all the way through 2hrs 47mins, and it passed the time as decent treatment of a depressing subject with scurvy, deprivation and murder. For those interested, I found history books and a novel about Camp Sumter, and at least one prisoner's diary: Full text of "Andersonville diary; escape, and list of dead, with name, company, regiment, date of death and number of grave in cemetery" .

The real Camp Sumter / Andersonville Prison.
A Depressing after story was on April 27th, 1865- 1,192 of the Liberated POWs died when the river steamboat Sultana they were on had a boiler explode and sink while the men were too physically weak to swim to shore
 
A Depressing after story was on April 27th, 1865- 1,192 of the Liberated POWs died when the river steamboat Sultana they were on had a boiler explode and sink while the men were too physically weak to swim to shore
"More fatalities than the Titanic"; I looked it up after your post. Salecker's Disaster on the Mississippi (Naval Institute Press, 1996) has good reviews.
 

skid2

LE
Book Reviewer
Seen the new Bladerunner pop up on my Now TV box

Is the Blade Runner sequel worth a watch, or am I going to ruin the enjoyment of the original by watching it ?
Half watched it while reading and doing the crossword on Saturday night. Couldn’t tell you a thing about it.
 
The freeview channel "Talking pictures" ran 'Terminus' yesterday, 1961 day in the life of Waterloo station, fascinating look back nearly 60 years, steam trains, dress styles, prices and a railway system on the brink of collapse. A John schlesinger film. 30 minutes of pure black and white nostalgia, from a world that has now vanished . The little 5 year old lost boy, Mathew Perry, are you out there, do you remember the occasion?
 
Re-watched The Martian after having it on the planner from Film 4 the other week. Saw it at pics when it came out & i still really like it. Very close to the book even if the final 20 mins seems rushed.
 
Dug out two old films last night; old 'dramatic thrillers'. Vertical Limit, which though far fetched wasn't that bad. And Dark Blue, around the 1992 L.A. race riots. Kurt Russell (v. good) and Ving Rhames. Not exactly Serpico, and from the school of Training Day and L.A. Confidential : Dark Blue is crude and stereotypical. Cue trailer with overly dramatic cliché commentary and gangsta rap:
 

Similar threads


Latest Threads

Top