What does an Artillery officer actually do?

I am looking to join the Royal Artillery and i am looming at going down the officer path. What roles do they fulfill? Do they actually operate the gun or is that left to other ranks? What maths knowledge do you need? Any insight into being an artillery officer (specifically working with the light gun) is appreciated?
 

Issi

War Hero
Have you looked at 'Gunner -Artillery Officer' on the MOD website?
 
Battle of Long Tan
Captain Maurice Stanley

I am sure some Royal Artillery Bod (affectionetly called 'Drop Shorts' by the rest of the Army) will be along to explain all, but look at the above links to the 'Battle of Long Tan' by ANZAC forces in South Vietnam in 1966 and the link to Captain Maurice Stanley RNZA, without whose efforts calling in supporting Artillery there would have probably been 108 dead Australian soldiers after the battle.
 
Last edited:

The_Duke

LE
Moderator
MOD comment - recruit forum, recruit forum rules. I am bored giving the same warnings over and over again. Straight ban next time.
 
I occasionally saw a FOO (Forward Observation Officer as it was called then - not sure if now) at work, they observe and correct / fire at the delivery end. It looked like an interesting and fun job to me.
 
I am looking to join the Royal Artillery and i am looming at going down the officer path. What roles do they fulfill? Do they actually operate the gun or is that left to other ranks? What maths knowledge do you need? Any insight into being an artillery officer (specifically working with the light gun) is appreciated?
Controlling and commanding, but not 'hands-on' operating, gun artillery, rocket artillery, air defence missiles and UAVs. As mentioned above, they can also be JTACs to call for fires, or be sneaky-beaky types in 4/73. Tend to shout a lot and be quite irritable because of deafness caused by considerable time spent around things that go bang very loudly.
 
Last edited:
Controlling and commanding, but not 'hands-on' operating, gun artillery, rocket artillery, air defence missiles and UAVs. As mentioned above, they can also be JTACs to call for fires, or be sneaky-beaky types in 4/73. Tend to shout a lot and be quite irritable because of deafness caused by considerable time spent around things that go bang very loudly.
Would that mean staying behind the guns and directing fire? Do you have to work on all pieces of artillery or just the one your regiment uses (hopefully 4th regiment)?
 
Would that mean staying behind the guns and directing fire? Do you have to work on all pieces of artillery or just the one your regiment uses (hopefully 4th regiment)?
You seem rather to have a rather Napoleonic view of how, on a modern, digitised, connected battlefield, artillery is used. It's been quite a few years since I worked with Field Artillery, but safe to say, as a subaltern you are in close proximity to the weapons themselves, as a Battery Commander or 2IC, but from there, the higher in rank you progress, the further back you go as you coordinate more and more effects over a more widely dispersed area.
 

FORMER_FYRDMAN

LE
Book Reviewer
You seem rather to have a rather Napoleonic view of how, on a modern, digitised, connected battlefield, artillery is used. It's been quite a few years since I worked with Field Artillery, but safe to say, as a subaltern you are in close proximity to the weapons themselves, as a Battery Commander or 2IC, but from there, the higher in rank you progress, the further back you go as you coordinate more and more effects over a more widely dispersed area.
One interesting instance of which was the air defence commander during the Battle of Malta who tried to develop a scheme whereby, if every piece of AD artillery fired simultaneously, any aircraft within a large box of sky was almost certain to be hit by something. I'm not sure how successful he was, I think the available comms defeated him, but it was innovative and shows that sometimes it's worth thinking inside the box.
 

Chef

LE
 

feu_de_joie

War Hero
It is a long time since I served and much has changed in organisations and terminology but the general principles stay the same. In your first posting you will be a CPO of some sort, overseeing technical duties and comms. The next step is GPO, which essentially is recce. As a FOO, BC and beyond you are an advisor to your supported arm, making sure that they receive the support they need.

At YOs, you will be trained “hands on” on all the current equipments as you need to know how the stuff in your charge works. You can expect to be posted between regiments every two to three years and at appropriate times to this, you will attend further training courses.

As someone has already said, the higher you go, the more remote you are to the equipment but handling equipment is not what you are employed for. As an officer, you’re main responsibility is the training and development of the soldiers in your command.
 

Latest Threads

Top