What did your town do for the War Effort?

#1
While researching for my latest story I got sidetracked and finished up spending several hours reading about the 'Bedford Triangle' of secret headquarters, code breaking, radio interception and deception.
Some of which are now common knowledge, like Bletchley Park, but others are relatively unknown. For example, Waterloo & Sons (now De La Rue) in Dunstable printed false foreign identity documents and The Luton News produced ‘Nachrichten für die Truppe’ (News for the Troops) for SOE.
There was an experimental radar or radio setup (no one seems quite sure which) which constructed on Dunstable Downs (above the gliding club) that utilised an antenna consisting of chicken wire - 20 mile of it! I still can't find out what that for.
Vauxhall Motors in Luton made Churchill tanks as well as the (in)famous Bedford trucks and the companies on Luton Airfield produced parts for Mosquitoes while Percival built training and transport aircraft.
During one collection the people an companies in Luton raised over £1 million!
What unusual or notable things went on in your neck of the woods?
 
#3
Averaged production of over 1 million munitions components a week, from 1941 to 1945. Amongst many other things being produced in the town for the war effort like equipment, camouflage netting, Army cooking equipment etc etc.
 
#4
Switched from the production of carpets to munitions. My mother worked full time making artillery shells I think. Kidderminster was the town btw.
 
#5
Home to large portion of RN and springboards for D Day . My favourite though , Eastney swimming pool , where i learnt to swim as a kid was where Cockleshell Heroes trained. Blondie Haslar planned the mission in his flat in Dolphin Court opposite Canoe Lake Southsea
 
#7
Lincoln.
They knocked out the odd tank (or should I say "water carrier for Mesopotamia") or two during the First Unpleasantness.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#8
We were a Luftwaffe bomb dump!

Sent from my BlackBerry 9780 using Tapatalk
 
#9
I'm led to believe that there were a couple of printing works that produced false documents and propaganda newspapers. There was also an experimental RF outfit that used a rather unusual antenna. Tanks and aircraft components, as well as complete aircraft, were made locally. The locals were also quite generous in financing the war effort.
 
#10
#11
The young men went off to be slaughtered gloriously as the situation demanded while the young women kept up the morale of our brave allies.

And potatoes, mustn't forget the potatoes.
 
#13
Bridgwater, Somerset. Raised enough money to buy a Spitfire for the RAF ... who promptly crashed it and wrote it off before it saw any action. Careless fcukers!

Berlin
 
T

Tremaine

Guest
#14
Beaumanor Hall and Park, Quorn/Woodhouse Eav es Leicestershire. Y Group WW2. "No Y Service.. no Ultra". Wireless Intelligence (Y) and radio fingerprinting feeding Station X. Even in 1997 when I was last there, if you didn't know about it you wouldn't have seen it from the road and it was still a miserable dark place at night. Loads of sheep I remember. Took a few people to see the big house, and they'd have not a clue.
Beaumanor Hall - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Loughborough Library has some great reference material including Joan Nicholls's England Needs You: The Story of Beaumanor Y Station World War 2. The book now costs well over £100 to buy on Amazon. Joan was ATS and worked there with Y Service. England Needs You

Easy now, you Garats Hay lot, not looking for trouble, just saying.
 
S

syledis

Guest
#15
Nobel explosives in Irvine

Great place for a wander , full of bunkers, mini railway lines and shelters etc
 
#16
Most of the ammo came from my home town my old old mum worked on Spitfire electric wiring my old and sadly dead dad flew them. He used to say that if his plane ever went tits up he would know who to blame.
 
#17
There was an experimental radar or radio setup (no one seems quite sure which) which constructed on Dunstable Downs (above the gliding club) that utilised an antenna consisting of chicken wire - 20 mile of it! I still can't find out what that for.
Could it relate to RAF Edlesborough, evidently a WW2 radio listening station located at the bottom of the hills? Guessing from internet-post uses of chicken wire, that may have helped the strength of the signal received by the main antennae.
 

ancienturion

LE
Book Reviewer
#18
My town (London) persuaded a lot of the Jerry bombers to drop their bombs on us instead of elsewhere. A lot of big towns did that.
 
#20
Salford stayed in the condition the Luftwaffe left it as a memorial to the effort. Either that or was early planning to twin town with Beiruit.
 

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