What did YOU do this w/e. me, I just stab people!

#1
Brings the number of stabbed in Lodnon this year to 23.

Indedant

Why can´t these buffoons go to a party, and not knife someone at the end of it?

Wont be long now before any knife that is over an inch is banned. And we have to eat our steaks in the form of a milkshake.

Or they ban "camping knives" ie swiss army, leathermans in attept to prevent knife crime, but we keep kitchen knives....
 
#2
Sadly, just another part of everyday life in Croydonia, the lavatory of the South-East.
 
#3
jarrod248 said:
There must be some sort of planning involved to take out a knife when going for a few beers. When I was young all my friends had knives when playing out to make throwing arrows and the like. None of us got stabbed and the knives were used as tools not weapons.
I still have a few knives mainly used when out camping or walking the dog in woods and finding some free food.
If the knife crime continues the people who use knives as tools will lose out because of the brain doners.
Hope those aren't lock knives Jarrod :(
 
#5
Hi all, why do the Chinese use chopsticks?Do some research and you will find paralells to the current situation.
Cheers :D
 
#6
Another "innocent" teen with no gang affiliation murdered in Londonistan.

What a crying shame they aren't using LMGs therefore eventually negating the problem of teenage gangs.
 
#7
I say let ém carry, let em have guns too. Make special areasf or them and let Darwin go to work. The survivors can be used as berzerkers in battle, spot of crack give em a stanley and set em off in the direction of Terry.
 
#8
It's called natural selection.

Me? I'd make it mandatory for them to carry knives and film the outcome for a new reality TV show sponsored by Wilkinson Sword.
 
#9
johnel said:
Hi all, why do the Chinese use chopsticks?Do some research and you will find paralells to the current situation.
Cheers :D
Urban myth mte, that´s why the Koreans, Vietnamese and others also use chopsticks. They were easy to make. Bronze and other metals have been used to make chopsticks too.

It is true, however, that other "tools" were used as weapons. Nanchuks aren´t just two sticks joined with a chain. They were originally used for flailing rice. Most Chinese martial arts "weapons" are actually tools in their original form.
 
#11
I have to use a lockknife through my job, however rather than attach it to my belt or pocket,which is easier to use, i now have to hide it away if a ferking toolbox. Which may sound, correct, but not when your hanging off a ladder.

We also have to be careful when doing our job in a hose in case occupant thinks were going to kill them, which in some houses i must admit id like to.
 
#12
Argee2007 said:
The Gerber i use is illegal going by UK law, due to the blade locking, i guess leatherman are also in this situation.
Yep.

Just goes to show how fcuking stoopid the mongs in power (both sides of the house) truely are.

You´ve stuck a knife in to some one.... face the lash.

500 birch swipes should just about do it. Then see how Kool it is to knife someone, "don´t touch the back!!!"

"Scuse me sir, do you mind leaving the pub, only your bleeding all over my nice chairs..."
 
#14
Can someone point out when lock knives were declared illegal?
AFAIK those with a blade under 3" are OK.
I've had a knife in my pocket for the last thirty-odd years because it's an indispensable tool & I'm buggered if I'm going to risk my fingers with a non locking blade.
 
#16
jarrod248 said:
Oddbod said:
Can someone point out when lock knives were declared illegal?
AFAIK those with a blade under 3" are OK.
I've had a knife in my pocket for the last thirty-odd years because it's an indispensable tool & I'm buggered if I'm going to risk my fingers with a non locking blade.
Well it seems almost everything we do is illegal these days and it it's not illegal it's heavily taxed.
Ah, Yes!

I forgot about the "We Can Nick You For anything We Like" Act 2007. :(
 
#17
Oddbod said:
Can someone point out when lock knives were declared illegal?
AFAIK those with a blade under 3" are OK.
I've had a knife in my pocket for the last thirty-odd years because it's an indispensable tool & I'm buggered if I'm going to risk my fingers with a non locking blade.
Virtually no knives are illegal. Even a flick-knife can be possessed. It is the circumstances of carry, import and manufacture that are controlled. The Criminal Justice Act 1988 provides for any person to carry a less-than-three-inch folding penknife without ANY repeat ANY further justification.

This was originally (but not specified in the Act) held to include lockknives, then some tw@t carried a lock knife into a disco and was nicked by the filth. The resulting test case before MiLord J Dredd held that a lock knife could not be carried using this exemption, chiz, chiz.

Sorry for the lawyer-like interest, but I carry a leatherman during my entire working day as a computer nerd (repairing the things) and I need to be able to verbally head-butt any filth who don't understand the concept of a multi-tool as a legitimate working tool kit. FWIW, there is another exemption in the CJA 1988 (subsection 5b) which allows Sikhs to carry a full-length sword in public, so I'm NEVER going to submit to being stopped from carrying an essential tool.
 
#18
Oddbod said:
Can someone point out when lock knives were declared illegal?
AFAIK those with a blade under 3" are OK.
I've had a knife in my pocket for the last thirty-odd years because it's an indispensable tool & I'm buggered if I'm going to risk my fingers with a non locking blade.
Criminal Justice Act 1988 (c. 33)
Main body
Part XI Miscellaneous
Articles with blades or points and offensive weapons

Version 2 of 2
139. Offence of having article with blade or point in public place.— (1) Subject to subsections (4) and (5) below, any person who has an article to which this section applies with him in a public place shall be guilty of an offence.
(2) Subject to subsection (3) below, this section applies to any article which has a blade or is sharply pointed except a folding pocketknife.
(3) This section applies to a folding pocketknife if the cutting edge of its blade exceeds 3 inches.
(4) It shall be a defence for a person charged with an offence under this section to prove that he had good reason or lawful authority for having the article with him in a public place.
(5) Without prejudice to the generality of subsection (4) above, it shall be a defence for a person charged with an offence under this section to prove that he had the article with him—
(a)for use at work;
(b)for religious reasons; or
(c)as part of any national costume.
(6) A person guilty of an offence under subsection (1) above shall be liable-
[ F1 (a)on summary conviction, to imprisonment for a term not exceeding six months, or a fine not exceeding the statutory maximum, or both;
(b)on conviction on indictment, to imprisonment for a term not exceeding two years, or a fine, or both.]
(7) In this section “public place" includes any place to which at the material time the public have or are permitted access, whether on payment or otherwise.

as far as lock knives go -

Deegan, R v (4th February, 1998)
Deegan, R v [1998] EWCA Crim 385 (4th February, 1998) D was found to be in possession of what the prosecution contended was "a bladed article". The knife could most accurately be described perhaps as a pocket knife which was capable of being opened and locked into an open position, and equally capable of being folded once the mechanism had been operated to unlock the blade. In the result the appellant was charged with being in possession of a bladed article contrary to Section 139 of the Criminal Justice Act 1988.

The appellant originally pleaded Not Guilty to possessing a bladed article in a public place. The judge however ruled that he was bound by two decisions of the Divisional Court in Harris v DPP and Fehmi v DPP , 96 Cr.App.R. 235. The judge ruled that the interpretation placed on a bladed article in those cases applied to the bladed article found in the possession of the appellant in the instant case. Having so ruled the appellant then pleaded Guilty. The judge discharged the appellant absolutely and certified that the matter was suitable for appeal on the basis that the Divisional Court was not made aware of the Parliamentary records of the debate which led to the enactment of Section 139 of the Criminal Justice Act 1988. Appeal dismissed

so, from the Deegan case - The Divisional Court in Harris v DPP and Fehmi v DPP 96 Cr.App.R. 235 held that to be "a folding pocket-knife" the blade has to be readily and immediately foldable at all times simply by the folding process. It held that a knife which on opening automatically locks and cannot be folded until a button has been pressed is not "a folding pocket-knife" within the meaning of Section 139. It is clear from the judgment of the Divisional Court, given by McCowan LJ, that attention was paid to what the thinking behind the statute might be. Ultimately McCowan LJ accepted the submission on behalf of the prosecution in that case that "when the knife is locked it becomes in effect a fixed blade knife and the intention of the statute is to prevent the carrying of such a knife." McCowan LJ finally concluded his judgment

"to be a folding pocket-knife the knife has to be readily and indeed immediately foldable at all times, simply by the folding process. A knife of the type with which these appeals are concerned is not in this category because, in the first place, there is a stage, namely, when it has been opened, when it is not immediately foldable simply by the folding process and, secondly, it requires that further process, namely, the pressing of the button." (see pp 239-240).



so, a lock knife has been illegal since 1988, but specifically, in caselaw, since 1998.

Clear?
 
#19
old_nis said:
Oddbod said:
Can someone point out when lock knives were declared illegal?
AFAIK those with a blade under 3" are OK.
I've had a knife in my pocket for the last thirty-odd years because it's an indispensable tool & I'm buggered if I'm going to risk my fingers with a non locking blade.
Virtually no knives are illegal. Even a flick-knife can be possessed. It is the circumstances of carry, import and manufacture that are controlled. The Criminal Justice Act 1988 provides for any person to carry a less-than-three-inch folding penknife without ANY repeat ANY further justification.

This was originally (but not specified in the Act) held to include lockknives, then some tw@t carried a lock knife into a disco and was nicked by the filth. The resulting test case before MiLord J Dredd held that a lock knife could not be carried using this exemption, chiz, chiz.

Sorry for the lawyer-like interest, but I carry a leatherman during my entire working day as a computer nerd (repairing the things) and I need to be able to verbally head-butt any filth who don't understand the concept of a multi-tool as a legitimate working tool kit. FWIW, there is another exemption in the CJA 1988 (subsection 5b) which allows Sikhs to carry a full-length sword in public, so I'm NEVER going to submit to being stopped from carrying an essential tool.
if it's an essential tool, you will not be stopped from carrying it will you.

It specifically states in the act that to carry a pointed or bladed article for the purpose of work is fine.

It's if youre carrying it in a nightclub whilst not at work that you'd be in the poo.

however it is never permissible to carry a flick knife as it is an offensive weapon, you would need to prove a reasonable excuse in court - ie found it in the street and was taking it to the police station, or that you were that bloke in soho who cuts people's hair in his shop with a flick knife and you'd just bought a replacement and was on the way to work!
 
#20
Oh dear, another one who can't read... I said possess a flick-knife; I can't see any reference to carrying it in public. Offensive weapons are only "offensive" if they can be proved to have been carried as an offensive weapon and this could, of course, apply to our hypothetical Leatherman. Certain objects would certainly be held to be inherently designed as an offensive weapon, and even I can't imagine a flick-knife would not be held to be in that category by the trendy liberal magistrates. However, a flick-knife can be possessed (owned). FWIW, a long-ago copy of Police Review actually had that very circumstance in the Sergeants' Exam revision questions.

And BTW, I notice that the stinking, criminal-supporting Law gives no opportunity to suggest defensive carry. Something that would at least allow a level playing (errr... stabbing?) field.
 

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